The Student Room Group

Tips for looking after your mental health & wellbeing at uni

Hi, I'm Hamza and I study Business and Management. Here are my practical tips and advice for looking after your mental health and wellbeing whilst studying at university.

University life brings your prospects, growth, and new skills to higher heights. Along with this, there are more academic challenges, social exchanges, and personal adjustments. It's fundamental to navigate university while putting your mental health and wellbeing before anything else.

Sleep routine 💤
While the late nights are unavoidable, starting a sleep routine might make a massive world of difference. You should routinely stick to a consistent sleeping and waking up time, even if your schedule is erratic. This helps control your body's internal clock, making it comfortable to fall asleep and wake up naturally. Resist the urge to pull all-nighters. A mind that is well rested is more productive than a sleep-deprived one.

Time management
One of the solutions to balancing sleep and university commitments is valuable time management. Personally, I plan my study sessions and project work well in advance to avoid last-minute cramming that can lead to sleep deprivation. If you do the same through managing your time wisely, you'll discover excellent productivity for your university projects and much-needed rest.

Instead of long sessions of non-stop work, you may allocate time for breaks, physical activity, social interactions, and personal activities. This balanced approach might help you enhance your overall well-being and contribute to better mental health whilst at university.

Less takeaways 🥡
Treating yourself to takeout occasionally can be a delightful treat but making it a regular routine can take a toll on your health. While that burger might be satisfying in the moment, it's fundamental to strike a balance between occasional satisfaction and a diet that supports your overall well-being. It's the well-rounded meals that nourish your body and inspire you to tackle your academic activities.

For example, do not have an energy drink on its own for breakfast and expect it to have a positive impact on your university day. Instead, try to get into the habit of waking up early to have some cereal so that you feel energised for the long university days.

Remember, your body is like a machine that needs the right fuel to perform at its best. Arranging a balanced diet that supports your physical and mental health will only benefit you in the longer term from personal experience.

Inform your personal academic tutor 💬
Sharing your mental health and wellbeing experiences can help reduce feelings of loneliness. Don't worry at all, it is highly likely that your tutor has encountered similar situations or knows of other students who have faced similar challenges. They might suggest strategies that have worked for other students in the past which could very well work for you too. This united understanding can create a sense of understanding to help your wellbeing extremely well.

Remember, you're never alone in this experience. Several students face similar challenges, and universities provide resources to help you succeed both academically and individually. By being practical about your mental health and well-being, you're setting yourself up for a fulfilling and triumphant university journey. Believe in yourself, take care, and know that you're capable of overcoming whatever comes your way. You've got this.

What are your top tips? :smile:
Original post by University of Bradford
Hi, I'm Hamza and I study Business and Management. Here are my practical tips and advice for looking after your mental health and wellbeing whilst studying at university.

University life brings your prospects, growth, and new skills to higher heights. Along with this, there are more academic challenges, social exchanges, and personal adjustments. It's fundamental to navigate university while putting your mental health and wellbeing before anything else.

Sleep routine 💤
While the late nights are unavoidable, starting a sleep routine might make a massive world of difference. You should routinely stick to a consistent sleeping and waking up time, even if your schedule is erratic. This helps control your body's internal clock, making it comfortable to fall asleep and wake up naturally. Resist the urge to pull all-nighters. A mind that is well rested is more productive than a sleep-deprived one.

Time management
One of the solutions to balancing sleep and university commitments is valuable time management. Personally, I plan my study sessions and project work well in advance to avoid last-minute cramming that can lead to sleep deprivation. If you do the same through managing your time wisely, you'll discover excellent productivity for your university projects and much-needed rest.

Instead of long sessions of non-stop work, you may allocate time for breaks, physical activity, social interactions, and personal activities. This balanced approach might help you enhance your overall well-being and contribute to better mental health whilst at university.

Less takeaways 🥡
Treating yourself to takeout occasionally can be a delightful treat but making it a regular routine can take a toll on your health. While that burger might be satisfying in the moment, it's fundamental to strike a balance between occasional satisfaction and a diet that supports your overall well-being. It's the well-rounded meals that nourish your body and inspire you to tackle your academic activities.

For example, do not have an energy drink on its own for breakfast and expect it to have a positive impact on your university day. Instead, try to get into the habit of waking up early to have some cereal so that you feel energised for the long university days.

Remember, your body is like a machine that needs the right fuel to perform at its best. Arranging a balanced diet that supports your physical and mental health will only benefit you in the longer term from personal experience.

Inform your personal academic tutor 💬
Sharing your mental health and wellbeing experiences can help reduce feelings of loneliness. Don't worry at all, it is highly likely that your tutor has encountered similar situations or knows of other students who have faced similar challenges. They might suggest strategies that have worked for other students in the past which could very well work for you too. This united understanding can create a sense of understanding to help your wellbeing extremely well.

Remember, you're never alone in this experience. Several students face similar challenges, and universities provide resources to help you succeed both academically and individually. By being practical about your mental health and well-being, you're setting yourself up for a fulfilling and triumphant university journey. Believe in yourself, take care, and know that you're capable of overcoming whatever comes your way. You've got this.

What are your top tips? :smile:

Hi Hamza,

What a great idea to share your top tips on how you take care of your mental health and well-being at university! I think each point you've suggested is incredibly important - especially finding a good sleep routine that works for you - and there are loads of things we can do to look after ourselves.

Keeping Active
Carving out time to do whatever kind of exercise you enjoy is incredibly important. Whether that is a simple stroll, going for a run, a yoga session, or HIIT training. Any kind of regular movement contributes to improving your mental and physical health, which can then translate into more successful study sessions and focus, better grades, improved sleep, and feeling great!

Connecting
A really important thing to do, which I think a lot of students forget, is to not be afraid when asking for help. Your friends, tutors, charities, and GP are there to support you through whatever worries you may have, so reach out! Connecting with other people throughout your time at university is also vital. Aside from the benefits to your mental health and well-being, spending time with others can be a lot of fun, and can help you with many different aspects of your life.

Be Kind to Yourself
Another important piece of advice that I think a lot of students also forget is to just be kind to yourself. Things may not go the way you planned, an assignment might be weighing on you, you might've had an argument with a friend.. whatever it is. Pause, take a moment to yourself, and remember how far you have come already. Think of all of the obstacles you have already overcome, and how small this issue could feel in the near future.

You've got this!

Isabella
Third-year Geography with a Year Abroad Student
(edited 4 months ago)
Reply 2
Get outside.

I really cannot stress this enough, especially for degree programmes with high contact hour, high lab workloads. Get outside in nature and do something pleasant a couple of times a week. You do have the time and it will make a difference.

Lean on your mates. Use the academic support available.

Be honest if you are struggling and let someone know. Things won't get better on their own, let someone help.
Original post by Chester Student
Hi Hamza,

What a great idea to share your top tips on how you take care of your mental health and well-being at university! I think each point you've suggested is incredibly important - especially finding a good sleep routine that works for you - and there are loads of things we can do to look after ourselves.

Keeping Active
Carving out time to do whatever kind of exercise you enjoy is incredibly important. Whether that is a simple stroll, going for a run, a yoga session, or HIIT training. Any kind of regular movement contributes to improving your mental and physical health, which can then translate into more successful study sessions and focus, better grades, improved sleep, and feeling great!

Connecting
A really important thing to do, which I think a lot of students forget, is to not be afraid when asking for help. Your friends, tutors, charities, and GP are there to support you through whatever worries you may have, so reach out! Connecting with other people throughout your time at university is also vital. Aside from the benefits to your mental health and well-being, spending time with others can be a lot of fun, and can help you with many different aspects of your life.

Be Kind to Yourself
Another important piece of advice that I think a lot of students also forget is to just be kind to yourself. Things may not go the way you planned, an assignment might be weighing on you, you might've had an argument with a friend.. whatever it is. Pause, take a moment to yourself, and remember how far you have come already. Think of all of the obstacles you have already overcome, and how small this issue could feel in the near future.

You've got this!

Isabella
Third-year Geography with a Year Abroad Student

Hey Isabella,

Thank you for sharing these tips, they are great! I love doing daily yoga and trying to do more meditation, it really helps me keep calm and practice my breathing. I also just love getting immersed in a good book to switch off from everything.

Have a great day! :smile:

Becky
Hello,

My name is Haya and I’m a final year medical student at UCLan

My top tips for looking after your mental health.

Reflect: I like to keep a diary to reflect about my day and plan for my upcoming days. 📚

•Exercise: I like to walk approximately 10,000 steps a day, and I enjoy going to the gym. 💪

•Plan your days out: I love to ensure that I have things to look forward to like meeting up with my friends or spending a chill day with book at home.🏡

If you also feel like things in university are getting overwhelming, speak to a friend or uni staff who will have a lot of tips for how to manage.

Best of luck,
Haya
MBBS V
Original post by University of Bradford
Hi, I'm Hamza and I study Business and Management. Here are my practical tips and advice for looking after your mental health and wellbeing whilst studying at university.

University life brings your prospects, growth, and new skills to higher heights. Along with this, there are more academic challenges, social exchanges, and personal adjustments. It's fundamental to navigate university while putting your mental health and wellbeing before anything else.

Sleep routine 💤
While the late nights are unavoidable, starting a sleep routine might make a massive world of difference. You should routinely stick to a consistent sleeping and waking up time, even if your schedule is erratic. This helps control your body's internal clock, making it comfortable to fall asleep and wake up naturally. Resist the urge to pull all-nighters. A mind that is well rested is more productive than a sleep-deprived one.

Time management
One of the solutions to balancing sleep and university commitments is valuable time management. Personally, I plan my study sessions and project work well in advance to avoid last-minute cramming that can lead to sleep deprivation. If you do the same through managing your time wisely, you'll discover excellent productivity for your university projects and much-needed rest.

Instead of long sessions of non-stop work, you may allocate time for breaks, physical activity, social interactions, and personal activities. This balanced approach might help you enhance your overall well-being and contribute to better mental health whilst at university.

Less takeaways 🥡
Treating yourself to takeout occasionally can be a delightful treat but making it a regular routine can take a toll on your health. While that burger might be satisfying in the moment, it's fundamental to strike a balance between occasional satisfaction and a diet that supports your overall well-being. It's the well-rounded meals that nourish your body and inspire you to tackle your academic activities.

For example, do not have an energy drink on its own for breakfast and expect it to have a positive impact on your university day. Instead, try to get into the habit of waking up early to have some cereal so that you feel energised for the long university days.

Remember, your body is like a machine that needs the right fuel to perform at its best. Arranging a balanced diet that supports your physical and mental health will only benefit you in the longer term from personal experience.

Inform your personal academic tutor 💬
Sharing your mental health and wellbeing experiences can help reduce feelings of loneliness. Don't worry at all, it is highly likely that your tutor has encountered similar situations or knows of other students who have faced similar challenges. They might suggest strategies that have worked for other students in the past which could very well work for you too. This united understanding can create a sense of understanding to help your wellbeing extremely well.

Remember, you're never alone in this experience. Several students face similar challenges, and universities provide resources to help you succeed both academically and individually. By being practical about your mental health and well-being, you're setting yourself up for a fulfilling and triumphant university journey. Believe in yourself, take care, and know that you're capable of overcoming whatever comes your way. You've got this.

What are your top tips? :smile:


Hey🙂

Managing your mental well-being is so important. All the tips I have read so far are very helpful!

Here some more tips to keep your mental health in check:

Mindful Breathing: Take a breather! Incorporate short mindful breathing exercises into your routine. A few minutes of focused breath can work wonders for stress levels. I have recently been attending yoga and breath work sessions and learning breathing techniques has been so helpful plus it is free and portable!!

Getting off the screen: schedule short breaks from screens. Whether it's a quick walk outside or just closing your eyes for a few minutes, these breaks can refresh your mind. I must admit this is one thing I need to work on as I spend way too much time on screens, but I am aware, and I am planning to swap out my phone for a book at least 20-30 minutes before I go to sleep to reduce screen time. Hopefully, I can gradually increase the time over a few weeks.

Be creative: In your free time try to express yourself through art/creativity. It doesn't have to be a masterpiece; it's more about the process and the time you’re giving to yourself. Doodle, paint, colour in or write.

Getting outside: spend time in nature, even if it's just a short walk in the area where you live. The fresh air can do wonders for your mental health.

Warm wishes,

Paige- UoC Digital Marketing MSc student
(edited 4 months ago)

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending