The Student Room Group

Second year adult nurse student, 1st placement in A&E.

Any tips /advice on how to make the most of this placement? So far I am LOVING every second, but I do feel a little overwhelmed and like a lost sheep at times?

Great full for any advice /tips, shared experiences?

Thank you :smile:
Original post by MS2410
Any tips /advice on how to make the most of this placement? So far I am LOVING every second, but I do feel a little overwhelmed and like a lost sheep at times?

Great full for any advice /tips, shared experiences?

Thank you :smile:

Hey,

It is great that you are enjoying your first placement in A&E.

Don't worry that you feel a little overwhelmed this is expected you are in a new and intense environment.

My advice would be don't be shy to ask questions. You are a student and learning and you will gain the most out of your placement by asking as many questions.

Try and get as much experience as you can in different parts of A&E as possible. This will help you expand and develop your knowledge and prepare you for when you graduate.

Don't put pressure on yourself. You are there to learn and gain experience. Set yourself realistic goals but don't be disheartened if you don't reach them straight away everything is a learning curve.

I hope this helps and good luck completing your placement :smile:
Hi there,

Maybe spoke out to areas within A&E such as resus, majors, clinical decision unit.

Also, A&E is a fantastic opportunity to practice skills such as venepuncture, cannulas, injections, medication management, ECGs etc (if you are able to, universities differ)

Enjoy!

Nat
Third-year student nurse
Reply 3
Original post by CCCU Health Rep
Hey,

It is great that you are enjoying your first placement in A&E.

Don't worry that you feel a little overwhelmed this is expected you are in a new and intense environment.

My advice would be don't be shy to ask questions. You are a student and learning and you will gain the most out of your placement by asking as many questions.

Try and get as much experience as you can in different parts of A&E as possible. This will help you expand and develop your knowledge and prepare you for when you graduate.

Don't put pressure on yourself. You are there to learn and gain experience. Set yourself realistic goals but don't be disheartened if you don't reach them straight away everything is a learning curve.

I hope this helps and good luck completing your placement :smile:

Thank you 🙂 i think i definitely put too much pressure on myself. I just want to learn as much as i can and be as useful as i can too as im aware im very lucky to have such a valuable placement? experience xxx
Reply 4
Original post by LJMUStudentReps
Hi there,

Maybe spoke out to areas within A&E such as resus, majors, clinical decision unit.

Also, A&E is a fantastic opportunity to practice skills such as venepuncture, cannulas, injections, medication management, ECGs etc (if you are able to, universities differ)

Enjoy!

Nat
Third-year student nurse

thank you xx yes i think the issue i have is i am limited as to what i can and cant do and sometimes this makes me feel a bit useless, also sometimes its very busy and staff dont always have time to teach but none the less im loving it and taking it all in , i guess the confidence will come with time and knowledge :smile:
I have worked in ED and similar environments extensively. The key thing to remember is that you are never alone or very far from help. As your confidence builds, get others to let you do the skills and practice practice practice. Know when to escalate or ask for advice/help. Patients will not mind a jot and will generally be supportive of nurses in training.

Try to relax and enjoy it. It's a great and supportive environment (or should be) even if it does appear very hectic, there is normally some systematic process at work underneath. Just remember, if you can manage working in ED then a regular ward should be straight forward by comparison.

If you aren't brave enough to ask another nurse about something, ask one of the senior doctors (all doctors secretly love teaching other people) or reach out to some of the HCAs- a lot of them are very experienced in their own right.

ED is entirely a team game and much of it is procedural or protocol lead. It just takes time to learn the ropes.
(edited 5 months ago)

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