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#1
Report 18 years ago
#1
1. Write down an equation representing the second ionisation enthalpy of copper.

2. Write out an equation which represents the first ionisation energy of Bromine.


Anyone help?
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Ralfskini
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#2
Report 18 years ago
#2
1. Cu+ -> Cu2+ + (electron)

2.Br -> Br- + (electron)
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Ralfskini
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#3
Report 18 years ago
#3
actually the br is + sry!
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Ralfskini
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#4
Report 18 years ago
#4
so shud be 2.Br -> Br+ + (electron)
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#5
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#5
Cheers mate. Can you explain this?
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king of swords
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#6
Report 18 years ago
#6
(Original post by Unregistered)
Cheers mate. Can you explain this?
Each time one electron is being removed and that takes a certain amount of energy (the ionisation energy) to remove it...
The first ionisation energy is making a neutral element become 1+ and the second is making a 1+ ion become 2+, etc etc.
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Ralfskini
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#7
Report 18 years ago
#7
The definition of 1st ionisation energy is: the energy required to remove an electron from each atom in a mole of atoms to form singly positive ions, measured under standard conditions.

So, an atom -> a positive ion (it has lost a negative charge) + an elec.

if a 2nd ionisation energy is required, then the atom has already undergone its 1ST ionisation energy so is already a positive ion:

singly positive ion -> duobly positive ion + another elec.


.......and so on....
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#8
Report 18 years ago
#8
Thanks for your help. Cleared that up, still not a chance of passing this though.
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king of swords
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#9
Report 18 years ago
#9
(Original post by Unregistered)
Thanks for your help. Cleared that up, still not a chance of passing this though.
Don't worry, in your revision just don't be afraid to ask questions and especially don't be afraid to say to someone that you didn't understand their version first time. That should really help if you're having problems with this stuff .
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