Different countries' traditions discussion thread Watch

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parsimony
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#21
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#21
(Original post by kew96158)
You've never heard of it???? I seriously am surprised, particularly if you go to a religious school! Considering Ash Wednesday wouldn't exist without Shrove Tuesday...

Have you seriously never heard of Pancake Day then? (The name most commonly used).

The idea of fasting on Ash Wednesday is because it's the first day of Lent, by the way... I don't think many people actually do fast, though.
well i attend a religious school because i have to (the only school in tokyo that has IB unfortunately) but i am not religious myself so i dont know these special days i am sorry

so the point is that you eat a lot of pancakes on tuesday and then fast on wendsday? thats funny and whats the occasion? Easter is still far away..
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Kew
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#22
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#22
(Original post by parsimony)
well i attend a religious school because i have to (the only school in tokyo that has IB unfortunately) but i am not religious myself so i dont know these special days i am sorry

so the point is that you eat a lot of pancakes on tuesday and then fast on wendsday? thats funny and whats the occasion? Easter is still far away..
Oh right, if you're not in England, that might explain it...

The whole point of Shrove Tuesday (it's official name) is that in the past, that was when people went to church to be shriven - to have their sins forgiven - before the beginning of Lent, which starts the day after, ie. on Ash Wednesday. As Lent always was a time of fasting, Shrove Tuesday was the opportunity to use up all the foods that couldn't be eaten during Lent, which is why pancakes are traditionally eaten then - they use up eggs and fats, which were among the 'forbidden' foods.

The fact that it is the last day before Lent is why Shrove Tuesday is a period of carnival in some countries - Mardi Gras springs to mind...

To be honest, today in modern times, Shrove Tuesday is so secularised it is only really a time for eating pancakes...
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frost105
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#23
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#23
On Burns night my family used to get together and we would have a highland fling! Lots of McLean tartan and scotch flying around. then we would have haggis (if you couls stomach it) for dinner and then one of the boys would recite a Burns poem of his choice and then we would continue with the horendous dancing and drinking again.
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Kew
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#24
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#24
(Original post by frost105)
On Burns night my family used to get together and we would have a highland fling! Lots of McLean tartan and scotch flying around. then we would have haggis (if you couls stomach it) for dinner and then one of the boys would recite a Burns poem of his choice and then we would continue with the horendous dancing and drinking again.
We had a Burns Night supper (formal dinner) in my Hall of Residence last year! It was great, we had the piping in of the haggis and everything!!! And what is more, it wasn't anywhere near Scotland... Apparently it's an annual tradition at that Hall because the first ever Warden was a direct descendant of Robert Burns.
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frost105
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#25
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#25
(Original post by kew96158)
We had a Burns Night supper (formal dinner) in my Hall of Residence last year! It was great, we had the piping in of the haggis and everything!!! And what is more, it wasn't anywhere near Scotland... Apparently it's an annual tradition at that Hall because the first ever Warden was a direct descendant of Robert Burns.
Heck I think the most ardent of scots dont even live in Scotland anymore! We used to travel up to Glasgow the night before and then stay for 5 days as my parents dealt with their hangovers!
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Luize
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#26
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#26
My Dad is Iranian and so I know a bit about Persian culture (Not muslim though)
The Iranian new year is soon, well next month.
There is usually a table set with 7 S's. Can't name them all but it involves coins, sweets and a table cloth is one as well.
I think another tradition is to grow something and throw it away or something. I used one of my Dads socks one year to grow cress and then we threw it in the river (confused about that really)

New year is the time to get new clothes and visit family. Traditionally the youngest/furthest in the family travels to the next oldest and so on until everyone is together. The celebration is meant to involve a lot of dancing and food as well I think.

I'm not all that clear on all the meanings behind it and some of the celebrations, wasn't really interested in it as a kid and hated having two cultures. It is very different from the Bristish new year.
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parsimony
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#27
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#27
(Original post by kew96158)
Oh right, if you're not in England, that might explain it...

The whole point of Shrove Tuesday (it's official name) is that in the past, that was when people went to church to be shriven - to have their sins forgiven - before the beginning of Lent, which starts the day after, ie. on Ash Wednesday. As Lent always was a time of fasting, Shrove Tuesday was the opportunity to use up all the foods that couldn't be eaten during Lent, which is why pancakes are traditionally eaten then - they use up eggs and fats, which were among the 'forbidden' foods.

The fact that it is the last day before Lent is why Shrove Tuesday is a period of carnival in some countries - Mardi Gras springs to mind...

To be honest, today in modern times, Shrove Tuesday is so secularised it is only really a time for eating pancakes...
oh thats sounds interessting
my french teacher brought some pancaces for our class it was funn..
well thanx for the explanation.. )
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Powersymphonia
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#28
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#28
(Original post by galadriel100)
School starting age here is 5 or 6. You can leave school at 16, but the government wants to make it higher so the unemployment figures look better.

I see you haven't heard of Powderfinger, you can listen to their songs on their site.
Aren't all government's just the same?
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Powersymphonia
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#29
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#29
(Original post by parsimony)
oh thats sounds interessting
my french teacher brought some pancaces for our class it was funn..
well thanx for the explanation.. )
Wow, thanks for your contributions ppl. There are some very intresting cultural traditions being discussed here.
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habosh
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#30
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|I hate school system here,I really do thank god I took the IGCSE/GCE system..I hate it..first of all it's 12 school years,the last school year like year 12 is the hardest in addition to having it as the last year and the scariest one students have to do more than 13 exams or 12 I don't exactly know
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