The Student Room Group

How to start revising

I am going to share some tips that completely changed my view of revision and helped me get the grades I wanted.

Firstly, get organised. If you are quite a visual person, like I am, then take some time to create a lovely revision timetable. This can be a digital or physical timetable. Just like you have a timetable at school or university, block out an hour after school or lectures to keep on working privately. Just like you wouldn’t skip class, you can’t skip your revision session either.

Secondly, YES it can be as little as an hour. You can do 20 minutes of revision a day if you want. It is still better than none. It is also better than cramping hours of revision in to one day. It is not an effective way to revise; you quickly lose concentration. One tip is to set a timer on your phone. Once the time is up you can have a break or just call it a day!

Thirdly, use online resources such as YouTube, StudyWise, Oak National Academy, Podcasts etc. Whatever works for you! Sometimes traditional methods such as working from a textbook or doing past papers may not be suitable for you. However, past papers are great for you to quickly see where your gaps in knowledge are, so definitely utilise them effectively.

This brings me to my final point. It is great trying all these revision methods but save yourself some time by figuring out your learning style first! Do you like to see things, hear things, read/write things or do things?? Once you know what kind of learner you are you can start to research what sort of revision techniques will support your learning style.

If you’re interested in reading more about revision tips, click this link https://bit.ly/3uCzvZl

Please reply to this thread with some of your tips!

Anastasia,
BCU Student Rep.
Original post by BCU Student Rep
I am going to share some tips that completely changed my view of revision and helped me get the grades I wanted.

Firstly, get organised. If you are quite a visual person, like I am, then take some time to create a lovely revision timetable. This can be a digital or physical timetable. Just like you have a timetable at school or university, block out an hour after school or lectures to keep on working privately. Just like you wouldn’t skip class, you can’t skip your revision session either.

Secondly, YES it can be as little as an hour. You can do 20 minutes of revision a day if you want. It is still better than none. It is also better than cramping hours of revision in to one day. It is not an effective way to revise; you quickly lose concentration. One tip is to set a timer on your phone. Once the time is up you can have a break or just call it a day!

Thirdly, use online resources such as YouTube, StudyWise, Oak National Academy, Podcasts etc. Whatever works for you! Sometimes traditional methods such as working from a textbook or doing past papers may not be suitable for you. However, past papers are great for you to quickly see where your gaps in knowledge are, so definitely utilise them effectively.

This brings me to my final point. It is great trying all these revision methods but save yourself some time by figuring out your learning style first! Do you like to see things, hear things, read/write things or do things?? Once you know what kind of learner you are you can start to research what sort of revision techniques will support your learning style.

If you’re interested in reading more about revision tips, click this link https://bit.ly/3uCzvZl

Please reply to this thread with some of your tips!

Anastasia,
BCU Student Rep.
omg this helped so much!!
Original post by BCU Student Rep
I am going to share some tips that completely changed my view of revision and helped me get the grades I wanted.

Firstly, get organised. If you are quite a visual person, like I am, then take some time to create a lovely revision timetable. This can be a digital or physical timetable. Just like you have a timetable at school or university, block out an hour after school or lectures to keep on working privately. Just like you wouldn’t skip class, you can’t skip your revision session either.

Secondly, YES it can be as little as an hour. You can do 20 minutes of revision a day if you want. It is still better than none. It is also better than cramping hours of revision in to one day. It is not an effective way to revise; you quickly lose concentration. One tip is to set a timer on your phone. Once the time is up you can have a break or just call it a day!

Thirdly, use online resources such as YouTube, StudyWise, Oak National Academy, Podcasts etc. Whatever works for you! Sometimes traditional methods such as working from a textbook or doing past papers may not be suitable for you. However, past papers are great for you to quickly see where your gaps in knowledge are, so definitely utilise them effectively.

This brings me to my final point. It is great trying all these revision methods but save yourself some time by figuring out your learning style first! Do you like to see things, hear things, read/write things or do things?? Once you know what kind of learner you are you can start to research what sort of revision techniques will support your learning style.

If you’re interested in reading more about revision tips, click this link https://bit.ly/3uCzvZl

Please reply to this thread with some of your tips!

Anastasia,
BCU Student Rep.
Hi Anastasia, @BCU Student Rep , this is a fab and comprehensive set of tips!

Definitely a big turning point in how effective my revision methods were, especially for my A-Levels, was finding my learning style as you mentioned. I am between a kinaesthetic and visual learner:jive:

What I really used throughout my degree(s) study was note-taking and colour coding. This was the best visual method for me to separate and categorise my modules, information, and associated text(s) so they were in order - both literally in my physical notes and in my memory! A big part of this was the physical act of highlighting and re-writing my notes to ensure that the information would sink-in :pride:

Alongside this, having audio in the background that was neutral ('lo-fi study beats' mixes on Spotify/YouTube were my favourite) encouraged me to 'zone-out' almost, but into a concentration mode.:curious:
Another method, that definitely assisted the best in regards to presentation assessments, was speaking aloud and presenting my ideas in an empty space, or to friends, and/ or family. Discussing ideas and debating perspectives with peers (in a study or friendship group for example) also helped significantly in my engagement with more challenging concepts.:rolleyes:

As OP says, the best revision tips are individual to you and your learning style - once you know it!
Has anyone got any other tips? Have we missed something? Let us know!:biggrin:

-Rose:rose:, De Montfort University Rep.
(edited 3 months ago)

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