The Student Room Group

Capital punishment

Should capital punishment be re introduced in certain countries?
Reply 1
Which countries?
Original post by Shreeyaaa
Should capital punishment be re introduced in certain countries?
if you mean the UK. perhaps for knife crime ( murder) if proven without a doubt. its seems quite a big epidemic here.
Reply 3
Original post by jacksmith23
if you mean the UK. perhaps for knife crime ( murder) if proven without a doubt. its seems quite a big epidemic here.
The evidence suggests that capital punishment is not a deterrent to serious crime.
Education, rehabilitation, etc would appear to result in better outcomes.
Also, there have been many "certain" convictions that later turned out to be miscarriages of justice.
Original post by 2WheelGod
The evidence suggests that capital punishment is not a deterrent to serious crime.
Education, rehabilitation, etc would appear to result in better outcomes.
Also, there have been many "certain" convictions that later turned out to be miscarriages of justice.
fair points to bring up, however some things.

with regards to the evidence of capital punishments, are you referring to when we last had it, ie the bloody code. or is there new data to point this out, such as the USA? if so can you provide it as it is fun to read a bit on this topic?

as preventive measures with education, we already do that in the UK, what do you think should change to suit it. crimes like murder seem to occur with gangs and people join gangs for monetary benefit, or they are forced to. so what would you educate people about differently?

how would you rehabilitate a criminal who has stabbed someone in cold blood? is there a point if the sentence normally could be life.

there is quite a culture it seems to me with gangs, and with that monetary benefit, so even with the risks there is still a chance that people will join up anyway. it seems you need to be harsh someone how to at least cause some fear. i remember a point brought up by one of my friends on the case of the gulf countries with the radical/ extreme law of someone's hand potentially being chopped off depending on the situation/ conditions ( stealing), with the positives being that crime in regards to stealing is quite low. while not using that extreme measures, something to me personally we should make measures harsher for the crime, which should be capital punishment. perhaps. if you decided to murder someone in cold blood, without a doubt, i think you have forfeited your life because you've taken someone else's. also if the victim's family, wants the death penalty should that be a factor, i remember a woman i think from Germany a while ago decades ago, murdering someone in the court room. so there are families who may want to see death for murders would you allow justice to occur for them?

it's true about wrongful convictions, but i said convictions without a doubt, such as DNA evidence, cctv footage.

https://walthamforestecho.co.uk/2024/03/15/teen-faces-20-years-in-jail-for-renell-charles-murder/

with regard to education, it seems that this teen who killed someone did it for no apparent reason according to this. ( just searched stabbings and this was a recent conviction). so what could be done to educate young people about not carrying knives and more.
Reply 5
Every Judicial system is flawed so no we should never have capital punishment.
No we're far too corrupt to trust with that.
Reply 7
Original post by jacksmith23
fair points to bring up, however some things.
with regards to the evidence of capital punishments, are you referring to when we last had it, ie the bloody code. or is there new data to point this out, such as the USA? if so can you provide it as it is fun to read a bit on this topic?
as preventive measures with education, we already do that in the UK, what do you think should change to suit it. crimes like murder seem to occur with gangs and people join gangs for monetary benefit, or they are forced to. so what would you educate people about differently?
how would you rehabilitate a criminal who has stabbed someone in cold blood? is there a point if the sentence normally could be life.
there is quite a culture it seems to me with gangs, and with that monetary benefit, so even with the risks there is still a chance that people will join up anyway. it seems you need to be harsh someone how to at least cause some fear. i remember a point brought up by one of my friends on the case of the gulf countries with the radical/ extreme law of someone's hand potentially being chopped off depending on the situation/ conditions ( stealing), with the positives being that crime in regards to stealing is quite low. while not using that extreme measures, something to me personally we should make measures harsher for the crime, which should be capital punishment. perhaps. if you decided to murder someone in cold blood, without a doubt, i think you have forfeited your life because you've taken someone else's. also if the victim's family, wants the death penalty should that be a factor, i remember a woman i think from Germany a while ago decades ago, murdering someone in the court room. so there are families who may want to see death for murders would you allow justice to occur for them?
it's true about wrongful convictions, but i said convictions without a doubt, such as DNA evidence, cctv footage.
https://walthamforestecho.co.uk/2024/03/15/teen-faces-20-years-in-jail-for-renell-charles-murder/
with regard to education, it seems that this teen who killed someone did it for no apparent reason according to this. ( just searched stabbings and this was a recent conviction). so what could be done to educate young people about not carrying knives and more.
https://deathpenaltyinfo.org/facts-and-research/murder-rates/murder-rate-of-death-penalty-states-compared-to-non-death-penalty-states

https://math.dartmouth.edu/~lamperti/my%20DP%20paper,%20current%20edit.htm

The justice system needs to be about more than simply punishment. There is evidence that if inmates are provided opportunities for things like education, training, counselling, etc they are less likely to reoffend.

As for miscarriages of justice, it can happen even where there is DNA or CCTV evidence.
Original post by 2WheelGod
https://deathpenaltyinfo.org/facts-and-research/murder-rates/murder-rate-of-death-penalty-states-compared-to-non-death-penalty-states
https://math.dartmouth.edu/~lamperti/my%20DP%20paper,%20current%20edit.htm
The justice system needs to be about more than simply punishment. There is evidence that if inmates are provided opportunities for things like education, training, counselling, etc they are less likely to reoffend.
As for miscarriages of justice, it can happen even where there is DNA or CCTV evidence.
i agree of course it needs to be more than just punishment. is should be about reforming criminals while serving appropriate justice. as I've said before I think its a little different when it comes to knife crime ( murder). I'll take a look at those two links so thanks.

true for the last points, but its highly unlikely.
Reply 9
Original post by jacksmith23
i agree of course it needs to be more than just punishment. is should be about reforming criminals while serving appropriate justice. as I've said before I think its a little different when it comes to knife crime ( murder). I'll take a look at those two links so thanks.
true for the last points, but its highly unlikely.
The unlikelihood of a false conviction won't help the innocent person who is executed. Just one instance is one too many to be acceptable.
Reply 10
Personally, i see no reason not to that would change my mind. Sex offenders, *****'s and capital murderers can swing.
Whilst the argument for innocent people being executed is a good one, its rare enough that it doesn't swing my view. For a simple reason really in that the victims and their families should be front and centre in the sentencing process, outside exceptions should not negatively impact that.
After all, here, victims not only have to be galled in seeing vermin getting lax sentences (a man who raped dozens of children for 15 years got 10 years recently, realistically thats 4yrs in jail.) but are slapped in the face for a second time with things like restorative justice meetings to hear them moan about their deprived childhoods etc. Sending such offenders to the gallows removes these extra slaps to victims and their loved ones neatly.

All that being said, i do deeply dislike the idea of the state having the right of life and death over people but theres no way around it really.
Reply 11
Original post by Napp
Personally, i see no reason not to that would change my mind. Sex offenders, *****'s and capital murderers can swing.
Whilst the argument for innocent people being executed is a good one, its rare enough that it doesn't swing my view. For a simple reason really in that the victims and their families should be front and centre in the sentencing process, outside exceptions should not negatively impact that.
After all, here, victims not only have to be galled in seeing vermin getting lax sentences (a man who raped dozens of children for 15 years got 10 years recently, realistically thats 4yrs in jail.) but are slapped in the face for a second time with things like restorative justice meetings to hear them moan about their deprived childhoods etc. Sending such offenders to the gallows removes these extra slaps to victims and their loved ones neatly.
All that being said, i do deeply dislike the idea of the state having the right of life and death over people but theres no way around it really.

Sex offenders and peadophiles are often victims of abuse themselves earlier in life. I am in favour of harsher sentences in whatever form they need to take - for example the recent case of the man who raped and murdered two 15 year old girls should have served consecutive terms for each crime. Or what the court is saying is "the rape of your teenage daughter is worth 6 years, her murder 6 years" Tell me is that justice? No its a f disgrace on our country.

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