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I need help on my inspector calls essay

Hey I’m in yr 11 I’ve done my mocks however I made a dramatic fall into a grade 5 as I didn’t do well on my inspector calls usually I’m a 7 but I need help on formulating my essays to get back up before the exams start. My teacher told me not to stress out but I can’t help but stressing as I have 4 weeks left :frown:
Reply 1
Heyyy! I did AIC for my GCSE(I did English early), English is really easy once it clicks. I would recommend rereading it and annotating it(also go on genius.com, it has each act annotated), pick at least 10 lines from each character to memorise(all depicting different moods etc) and memorise lines from the setting. Its no use memorising quotes without using them, so make sure you understand the meaning behind the quotes you picked, focus on structure as well as language, so like when Birling uses short phrases and sentences what would that represent and how it emphasises on what he says. Good luck!!!
Reply 2
also, it really helps planning your essays for about 5 minutes before you do the essay. I start by bulllet pointing a rough introduction, then for each paragraph do a theme for a different one, and add your chosen quotes for the paragraph and bullet point their meanings and how it links back to the question, then do your conclusion. This way you know what your writing and your not stopping much in the exam, you have a month so practice as many past papers you can!!!
Original post by cyberd00m
Heyyy! I did AIC for my GCSE(I did English early), English is really easy once it clicks. I would recommend rereading it and annotating it(also go on genius.com, it has each act annotated), pick at least 10 lines from each character to memorise(all depicting different moods etc) and memorise lines from the setting. Its no use memorising quotes without using them, so make sure you understand the meaning behind the quotes you picked, focus on structure as well as language, so like when Birling uses short phrases and sentences what would that represent and how it emphasises on what he says. Good luck!!!


Can I give you an example of my essays they are not finished for the ones that I’m practicing on but pls check it out
Original post by cyberd00m
also, it really helps planning your essays for about 5 minutes before you do the essay. I start by bulllet pointing a rough introduction, then for each paragraph do a theme for a different one, and add your chosen quotes for the paragraph and bullet point their meanings and how it links back to the question, then do your conclusion. This way you know what your writing and your not stopping much in the exam, you have a month so practice as many past papers you can!!!


Priestley criticises the selfishness of people like the birlings. What methods does he use to present this selfishness ?

Priestley wrote An inspector's calls to ultimately spread the awareness of a new socialist society arising to his 1945 audience. He utilises the construct of the Birlings to showcase their egoistic traits and how every single member of the household name, used and pushed away people for their own sake through the major uses of possessive pronouns and urging commands. Priestley then criticises by speaking ( through the inspector) with collective pronouns to hopefully make the Birlings realise how narrow minded they are. However nothing seems to change as they remain high in the pre-war Edwardian status, thus the cyclical cycle continues in the family which Priestley intended to show how capitalism has continued to control people for their own sake.

In the beginning of act one, Priestley introduces the family who are having dinner together whilst being smartly dressed for the occasion. Priestley uses this scene to show how careless they all are as they enjoy ‘champagne glasses’ and a ‘decanter of port’ whilst they all forget the reality surrounding their society such as the tension between a first world war arising and coal miners striking for a higher wages, all real issues created by capitalists however majority of them seem to stay comfortably at home and worry about themselves. The use of the valuable nouns ‘champagne’ and ‘decanter’ both are synonymous with the idea of living a lavish life, that they all recognize how powerful they are and so they enjoy it, knowing the exploitative path it took to gain what they so called ‘deserve.’ This overall suggests how intentionally the birling family disregards whilst uses society for a status gain as they are able to live a comfortable life, whilst many continue to suffer.

Furthermore, Priestly then moves over to the characters to present egoistic traits such as Mr Birling. For example he describes Mr Birling to be a ‘heavy looking’ man. The adjective ‘heavy’ denotes to have/be a lot, thus presenting connotations of an abundance to wealth or potentially power as he is able to use his abundance to get what he wants. Perhaps Priestley continues to zoom in on the adjective to prove his allegorical point of the rich which is ‘heavy’ in simple terms means to have great weight. Because Mr Birling is able to use his wealth to become heavy physically and money wise, Mr Birling has to overtime become sluggish with his ways of treating others (as he wasn't born into wealth) and his surroundings of wealth and capitalism has made it okay to be egoistic .
It’s not finished as I did three paragraphs but please give me lots of advice on my work
Reply 6
Original post by jolinemandou341
Priestley criticises the selfishness of people like the birlings. What methods does he use to present this selfishness ?
Priestley wrote An inspector's calls to ultimately spread the awareness of a new socialist society arising to his 1945 audience. He utilises the construct of the Birlings to showcase their egoistic traits and how every single member of the household name, used and pushed away people for their own sake through the major uses of possessive pronouns and urging commands. Priestley then criticises by speaking ( through the inspector) with collective pronouns to hopefully make the Birlings realise how narrow minded they are. However nothing seems to change as they remain high in the pre-war Edwardian status, thus the cyclical cycle continues in the family which Priestley intended to show how capitalism has continued to control people for their own sake.
In the beginning of act one, Priestley introduces the family who are having dinner together whilst being smartly dressed for the occasion. Priestley uses this scene to show how careless they all are as they enjoy ‘champagne glasses’ and a ‘decanter of port’ whilst they all forget the reality surrounding their society such as the tension between a first world war arising and coal miners striking for a higher wages, all real issues created by capitalists however majority of them seem to stay comfortably at home and worry about themselves. The use of the valuable nouns ‘champagne’ and ‘decanter’ both are synonymous with the idea of living a lavish life, that they all recognize how powerful they are and so they enjoy it, knowing the exploitative path it took to gain what they so called ‘deserve.’ This overall suggests how intentionally the birling family disregards whilst uses society for a status gain as they are able to live a comfortable life, whilst many continue to suffer.
Furthermore, Priestly then moves over to the characters to present egoistic traits such as Mr Birling. For example he describes Mr Birling to be a ‘heavy looking’ man. The adjective ‘heavy’ denotes to have/be a lot, thus presenting connotations of an abundance to wealth or potentially power as he is able to use his abundance to get what he wants. Perhaps Priestley continues to zoom in on the adjective to prove his allegorical point of the rich which is ‘heavy’ in simple terms means to have great weight. Because Mr Birling is able to use his wealth to become heavy physically and money wise, Mr Birling has to overtime become sluggish with his ways of treating others (as he wasn't born into wealth) and his surroundings of wealth and capitalism has made it okay to be egoistic .

Use more quotes in the first paragraph!! also mention that is is the post-war era, mention the parallels between the play being written right after ww2 and so the intended audience is from the post-ww2 era and how the play takes place right before ww1 and how Priestley foreshadows the war, so when you mention how narrow minded the birlings are, add that in, I think he goes on one of his speeches, saying there isnt a chance of war and he also mentions the titanic saying it is unsinkable, which means he does not know what is going to happen, he basically just waffles without knowing anything because he is so self-absorbed and also war/titanic sinking are threats to society and their class so that could be another reason why and it adds into the selfishism, also when you talk about the cycle, mention how the cycle is formed/how it exists, like how it is the older members of the family who continue the cycle because if their selfishness, compared to Eric and sheila who are able to sympathise better with Edna and are less selfish.

second paragraph, mention how it is introduced as like a house with modern solid wooden furniture(I dont remember the exact quote but it was something like that), the quote suggests it was very expensive and that they are comfortable, also it doesn't portray comfort or cosiness which again adds to their individualistic mindsets and lack of warmth in the house which foreshadows the selfishness of the characters later portrayed

for the last paragraph mention how Birling plays golf, playing golf is a very costly sport and also it shows how lazy he is as it doesn't take much to play golf, also him using it to threaten the inspector saying he plays golf with the chief constable, showing he uses his connections to get what he wants and he doesn't care about the inspector or why's there but to save himself

I feel like you have used a lot of adjectives which bulked it up a bit which isnt necessarily bad, but I think you explained more instead of using evidence which is really important too. Use at least 3-4 quotes per paragraph!!!
Reply 7
Original post by jolinemandou341
Priestley criticises the selfishness of people like the birlings. What methods does he use to present this selfishness ?
Priestley wrote An inspector's calls to ultimately spread the awareness of a new socialist society arising to his 1945 audience. He utilises the construct of the Birlings to showcase their egoistic traits and how every single member of the household name, used and pushed away people for their own sake through the major uses of possessive pronouns and urging commands. Priestley then criticises by speaking ( through the inspector) with collective pronouns to hopefully make the Birlings realise how narrow minded they are. However nothing seems to change as they remain high in the pre-war Edwardian status, thus the cyclical cycle continues in the family which Priestley intended to show how capitalism has continued to control people for their own sake.
In the beginning of act one, Priestley introduces the family who are having dinner together whilst being smartly dressed for the occasion. Priestley uses this scene to show how careless they all are as they enjoy ‘champagne glasses’ and a ‘decanter of port’ whilst they all forget the reality surrounding their society such as the tension between a first world war arising and coal miners striking for a higher wages, all real issues created by capitalists however majority of them seem to stay comfortably at home and worry about themselves. The use of the valuable nouns ‘champagne’ and ‘decanter’ both are synonymous with the idea of living a lavish life, that they all recognize how powerful they are and so they enjoy it, knowing the exploitative path it took to gain what they so called ‘deserve.’ This overall suggests how intentionally the birling family disregards whilst uses society for a status gain as they are able to live a comfortable life, whilst many continue to suffer.
Furthermore, Priestly then moves over to the characters to present egoistic traits such as Mr Birling. For example he describes Mr Birling to be a ‘heavy looking’ man. The adjective ‘heavy’ denotes to have/be a lot, thus presenting connotations of an abundance to wealth or potentially power as he is able to use his abundance to get what he wants. Perhaps Priestley continues to zoom in on the adjective to prove his allegorical point of the rich which is ‘heavy’ in simple terms means to have great weight. Because Mr Birling is able to use his wealth to become heavy physically and money wise, Mr Birling has to overtime become sluggish with his ways of treating others (as he wasn't born into wealth) and his surroundings of wealth and capitalism has made it okay to be egoistic .

you could also mention birlings factory, the strikes and Eva smith, he does not care about their lives and wages but only his profits

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