The Student Room Group

How do I just get out of retail

What jobs are worth doing that you can get immediately but your out of retail. I’m losing hope of ever finding a job in ICT and if it means no more stress from my line managers so be it.
Reply 1
Original post by Mohammed_2000
What jobs are worth doing that you can get immediately but your out of retail. I’m losing hope of ever finding a job in ICT and if it means no more stress from my line managers so be it.

Any office admin jobs will pay more than a minimum wage but are likely to be less stressful than retail in general. Although bear in mind that regardless of how good the industry and the particular company culture is, a bad manager can make your life miserable as well as a good manager can make it all good even when working in places like McDonalds (speaking from experience here), so make sure you look for any red flags during the interviews. You're interviewing them as much as they interview you.
You could also look for supply chain kind of roles. For example procurement normally doesn't require a specific degree and you can get APICS certified on your own to qualify for such roles (it's expensive but not as expensive as a degree). The career path and pay in supply chain can be rather good.

I don't know much about ICT roles, but pretty sure you can work for a network company as some sort of installer, network technician, etc. You may need some certifications, but that's all achievable on your own.

All the best,
Al
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by ThatguyAl
Any office admin jobs will pay more than a minimum wage but are likely to be less stressful than retail in general. Although bear in mind that regardless of how good the industry and the particular company culture is, a bad manager can make your life miserable as well as a good manager can make it all good even when working in places like McDonalds (speaking from experience here), so make sure you look for any red flags during the interviews. You're interviewing them as much as they interview you.
You could also look for supply chain kind of roles. For example procurement normally doesn't require a specific degree and you can get APICS certified on your own to qualify for such roles (it's expensive but not as expensive as a degree). The career path and pay in supply chain can be rather good.
I don't know much about ICT roles, but pretty sure you can work for a network company as some sort of installer, network technician, etc. You may need some certifications, but that's all achievable on your own.
All the best,
Al

Hi Al,

Thank you do you know any websites best to apply from that you would recommend please. Especially if I’m looking to follow the entry route into IT a job board site with entry level positions
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 3
Original post by Mohammed_2000
Hi Al,
Thank you do you know any websites best to apply from that you would recommend please. Especially if I’m looking to follow the entry route into IT a job board site with entry level positions

I don't know any specific websites for that, but you can try the standard google, indeed, linkedin and such.
I also suggest looking for such opportunities directly with the companies that you think may have such roles open.
Also, there's this gradcracker portal - https://www.gradcracker.com/
It's generally very useful for STEM students and graduates, but you can use it to see what companies offer what roles in IT sector too. Perhaps even apply for some internships or placements if you wish.
Reply 4
Apprenticeships? College course? They are not usually more than 20 hours per week so leaves plenty of time to do a regular job alongside.

What type of ICT career(s) are you interested in, its a big field?

There are usually a host of free courses online, particularly when it comes to coding. Some charities look for volunteers to do ICT roles.

You are going to have to show a prospective employer, even at trainee or entry level, that you have skills, aptitude, motivation in the field.

You seem keen on finding a website with these jobs but with a career change, you may need to do a bit more preparation to lift your CV out of dozens, maybe hundreds, that are applying.
Reply 5
Apologies, i can see on your previous posts that you have graduated with a degree in Computer networks. When did you graduate?
Does your Uni offer a careers service where they can give you advice about your CV, job applications, work placements, recruitment fairs?
How many ICT roles have you applied for and how many interviews did this result in? Has any of the companies given you feedback on your applications or interviews?
Original post by Compyjo
Apprenticeships? College course? They are not usually more than 20 hours per week so leaves plenty of time to do a regular job alongside.
What type of ICT career(s) are you interested in, its a big field?
There are usually a host of free courses online, particularly when it comes to coding. Some charities look for volunteers to do ICT roles.
You are going to have to show a prospective employer, even at trainee or entry level, that you have skills, aptitude, motivation in the field.
You seem keen on finding a website with these jobs but with a career change, you may need to do a bit more preparation to lift your CV out of dozens, maybe hundreds, that are applying.

I don’t think I would be eligible to do an apprenticeship otherwise I would have loved to do a Helpdesk or IT Support apprenticeship. I’m unsure what a college course would lead towards especially since I have a-levels in information and communication technology.

IT careers that interest me most: IT Support, IT Helpdesk, IT Project Management.

I’m unsure and not aware of charities that’s the thing…
Original post by Compyjo
Apologies, i can see on your previous posts that you have graduated with a degree in Computer networks. When did you graduate?
Does your Uni offer a careers service where they can give you advice about your CV, job applications, work placements, recruitment fairs?
How many ICT roles have you applied for and how many interviews did this result in? Has any of the companies given you feedback on your applications or interviews?

Completed university April 2023, Graduated September 2023. I’ve spoken to careers team did not find them helpful would only have like a 15-30 minute consultation. I’ve applied to tons mostly Junior and Trainee had like more than 5 but under 10. You get the occasional email where application no longer progressed or they’ll tell you the type of interview you’ll anticipate and prepare for but when you go to the interviews the questions you thought may come up and you practice for don’t and the interviewer takes me to be amusing and makes no effort to do an interview.
Reply 8
You will soon be competing with new graduates.

Sounds like you need to improve the quality of your applications as you are not converting them into many interviews and you also need improve your interview skills to convert them into job offers.

But it also sounds from the tone of your posts and negative comments in them that you are very demoralised - your boss is terrible, the careers service is rubbish, interviewers are unprofessional etc.

As you are a graduate, and as you have strong digital skills, I would expect you to easily identify volunteer vacancies in IT, if you thought the experience gained from it, might improve your job prospects.

I don't know where you live but by typing into Google various search terms like 'IT volunteer, IT assistant, IT support opportunities' , dozens of hits came up for unpaid roles including some that could be done remotely and some that welcomed new grads.
Reply 9
Free courses offered by Cisco.

https://skillsforall.com/

I imagine there are dozens of free IT courses that you can self study online in technical, helpdesk and project management.

This will boost your CV and confidence.and show prospective employers how committed you are to your professional development.
Thank you so much :smile:

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