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What resources are the best way to prep for ucat?
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Megathreads
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The "Which Medical School Should I Apply To?" Uberthread
The Ultimate 'Am I Good Enough For Medicine?' Angst Thread
Medicine A-Level subjects queries
Work Experience and Voluntary Work

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Official Undergraduate Medicine 2023 Entry
Graduate Entry Medicine 2023 Entry
Medicine 2023 entry for resit / retake / gap year applicants
A100 Medicine for International Students 2023 Entry
Medicine Interview discussion 2023 Entry
2023 entry A100 / A101 Medicine fastest and slowest offer senders
Index of Individual Medical School Applicants' threads 2023 Entry

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Graduate Entry Medicine 2024 Entry
GAMSAT 2024 / 2025 entry discussions megathread
UCAT 2024 Entry Discussions Megathread

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Graduate Entry Medicine 2025 Entry
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Useful Articles:
GCSE Requirements for Medicine
Everything you need to know about the BMAT
Work Experience as a Graduate or Mature student
Medicine Personal Statement Advice
Medicine Personal Statement Advice (Graduate Entry)
Interview Frequently Asked Questions
MMI Medicine Interview Tips
What to do after an unsuccessful first application

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Reply 2
Original post by premedMM
What resources are the best way to prep for ucat?

medify/medentry but the best is ucats own q banks and mocks
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 3
Original post by premedMM
What resources are the best way to prep for ucat?

The best way to prepare for the ucat is to consistently do practice questions using medify or medentry. I personally used medify and did 2 months of daily practice, starting with untimed practice in the first couple of weeks before moving onto timed practice, and doing a full mock at the start of each day during the second month. This method worked really well for me as I was able to achieve a final score of 3200+, which was pretty much all down to consistent practice. Feel free to ask if you have any further questions :smile:
Reply 4
Original post by l0120
The best way to prepare for the ucat is to consistently do practice questions using medify or medentry. I personally used medify and did 2 months of daily practice, starting with untimed practice in the first couple of weeks before moving onto timed practice, and doing a full mock at the start of each day during the second month. This method worked really well for me as I was able to achieve a final score of 3200+, which was pretty much all down to consistent practice. Feel free to ask if you have any further questions :smile:

Thank you! Congratulations on achieving such a high score. How did you use Medentry? and was medify similar to real exam?
Reply 5
Original post by premedMM
Thank you! Congratulations on achieving such a high score. How did you use Medentry? and was medify similar to real exam?

No worries, and I didn't actually use medentry in the end but it really is just an alternative to medify. I wouldn't stress too much about which one to use out of the two, because at the end of the day the important thing is just that you are using one of them. In terms of medify, I personally found it to be pretty representative of the real exam, but of course the most accurate resource will be the official ucat mocks so make sure you save those until the very end of your preparation. Any more questions just lmk
Original post by l0120
No worries, and I didn't actually use medentry in the end but it really is just an alternative to medify. I wouldn't stress too much about which one to use out of the two, because at the end of the day the important thing is just that you are using one of them. In terms of medify, I personally found it to be pretty representative of the real exam, but of course the most accurate resource will be the official ucat mocks so make sure you save those until the very end of your preparation. Any more questions just lmk


Hi, I hope you don’t mind but could I ask if you have any tips for the ucat?
Reply 7
Original post by lilysilly_5454
Hi, I hope you don’t mind but could I ask if you have any tips for the ucat?

Hey, yes of course I'm more than happy to give some advice. Apologies in advance for the length of this answer, will just try to include everything I can think of!

Firstly, the most important thing is to start practice early enough and do it consistently. As you might have seen me say above, I would recommend doing about 2 months of near daily practice to build up your skills as I found my performance really peaked at this point. In terms of how to practice, I used medify but you could also use medentry, and here is the rough schedule I followed:

Week 1 - Learn about the questions by using the medify video tutorials and some untimed practice

Week 2 - Practice untimed questions to build accuracy, making sure to review both correct and incorrect answers to learn the strategies

Week 3 - Start to build in some timed practice. Time management is probably the hardest part of the ucat, so it is important to recognise that you won't finish every question and instead practice just doing as many as you can in the time.

Week 4 - Do some single section mocks alongside your other practice, again to get used to the time pressures.

Weeks 5-7 - Start doing a full mock at the beginning of each session, and then use the rest of the session to work on the weakest section or question types. Do not worry if your first few mock scores are low, mine were too, and it does take time to see a major improvement as it's all about building that mental stamina.

Week 8 - Attempt the official UCAT mocks to give the most accurate representation of the real thing.

The other major piece of advice I have is about time management strategies. As I said before you shouldn't aim to finish every question, and instead use the timed practice to find a rough number of sets to aim to complete in each section and then adjust your timings accordingly. I liked to set 'milestones' of how many questions I wanted to complete by a certain time, and I was also very strict about sticking to the time limit I'd given myself for each question. I also used the 'guess, flag, and move on' technique whereby on the first pass through the section I would only complete the easier questions and guess and flag the harder ones, then come back to the flagged ones after. Some question types are more time-consuming than others, for example multi-step calculations in qr, patterns you just can't spot in ar, or negative questions in vr, so it makes sense to save those until last and get all the 'easy' marks first.

Finally, make sure you know how to use the keyboard shortcuts and calculator effectively as this really will save time. For the calculator specifically I would say to practice using the keyboard number pad to save time as well.

Overall I can't stress enough that the main thing to do is to practice each individual question type loads and find the techniques that work for you. I think I've covered the main stuff, but if you have any further questions or want any section specific advice don't hesitate to ask :smile:
Original post by l0120
Hey, yes of course I'm more than happy to give some advice. Apologies in advance for the length of this answer, will just try to include everything I can think of!
Firstly, the most important thing is to start practice early enough and do it consistently. As you might have seen me say above, I would recommend doing about 2 months of near daily practice to build up your skills as I found my performance really peaked at this point. In terms of how to practice, I used medify but you could also use medentry, and here is the rough schedule I followed:
Week 1 - Learn about the questions by using the medify video tutorials and some untimed practice
Week 2 - Practice untimed questions to build accuracy, making sure to review both correct and incorrect answers to learn the strategies
Week 3 - Start to build in some timed practice. Time management is probably the hardest part of the ucat, so it is important to recognise that you won't finish every question and instead practice just doing as many as you can in the time.
Week 4 - Do some single section mocks alongside your other practice, again to get used to the time pressures.
Weeks 5-7 - Start doing a full mock at the beginning of each session, and then use the rest of the session to work on the weakest section or question types. Do not worry if your first few mock scores are low, mine were too, and it does take time to see a major improvement as it's all about building that mental stamina.
Week 8 - Attempt the official UCAT mocks to give the most accurate representation of the real thing.
The other major piece of advice I have is about time management strategies. As I said before you shouldn't aim to finish every question, and instead use the timed practice to find a rough number of sets to aim to complete in each section and then adjust your timings accordingly. I liked to set 'milestones' of how many questions I wanted to complete by a certain time, and I was also very strict about sticking to the time limit I'd given myself for each question. I also used the 'guess, flag, and move on' technique whereby on the first pass through the section I would only complete the easier questions and guess and flag the harder ones, then come back to the flagged ones after. Some question types are more time-consuming than others, for example multi-step calculations in qr, patterns you just can't spot in ar, or negative questions in vr, so it makes sense to save those until last and get all the 'easy' marks first.
Finally, make sure you know how to use the keyboard shortcuts and calculator effectively as this really will save time. For the calculator specifically I would say to practice using the keyboard number pad to save time as well.
Overall I can't stress enough that the main thing to do is to practice each individual question type loads and find the techniques that work for you. I think I've covered the main stuff, but if you have any further questions or want any section specific advice don't hesitate to ask :smile:

Thank you so much.
Reply 9
Original post by l0120
No worries, and I didn't actually use medentry in the end but it really is just an alternative to medify. I wouldn't stress too much about which one to use out of the two, because at the end of the day the important thing is just that you are using one of them. In terms of medify, I personally found it to be pretty representative of the real exam, but of course the most accurate resource will be the official ucat mocks so make sure you save those until the very end of your preparation. Any more questions just lmk

Thank you, did you find the ucat question banks helpful aswell?
Reply 10
Original post by l0120
Hey, yes of course I'm more than happy to give some advice. Apologies in advance for the length of this answer, will just try to include everything I can think of!
Firstly, the most important thing is to start practice early enough and do it consistently. As you might have seen me say above, I would recommend doing about 2 months of near daily practice to build up your skills as I found my performance really peaked at this point. In terms of how to practice, I used medify but you could also use medentry, and here is the rough schedule I followed:
Week 1 - Learn about the questions by using the medify video tutorials and some untimed practice
Week 2 - Practice untimed questions to build accuracy, making sure to review both correct and incorrect answers to learn the strategies
Week 3 - Start to build in some timed practice. Time management is probably the hardest part of the ucat, so it is important to recognise that you won't finish every question and instead practice just doing as many as you can in the time.
Week 4 - Do some single section mocks alongside your other practice, again to get used to the time pressures.
Weeks 5-7 - Start doing a full mock at the beginning of each session, and then use the rest of the session to work on the weakest section or question types. Do not worry if your first few mock scores are low, mine were too, and it does take time to see a major improvement as it's all about building that mental stamina.
Week 8 - Attempt the official UCAT mocks to give the most accurate representation of the real thing.
The other major piece of advice I have is about time management strategies. As I said before you shouldn't aim to finish every question, and instead use the timed practice to find a rough number of sets to aim to complete in each section and then adjust your timings accordingly. I liked to set 'milestones' of how many questions I wanted to complete by a certain time, and I was also very strict about sticking to the time limit I'd given myself for each question. I also used the 'guess, flag, and move on' technique whereby on the first pass through the section I would only complete the easier questions and guess and flag the harder ones, then come back to the flagged ones after. Some question types are more time-consuming than others, for example multi-step calculations in qr, patterns you just can't spot in ar, or negative questions in vr, so it makes sense to save those until last and get all the 'easy' marks first.
Finally, make sure you know how to use the keyboard shortcuts and calculator effectively as this really will save time. For the calculator specifically I would say to practice using the keyboard number pad to save time as well.
Overall I can't stress enough that the main thing to do is to practice each individual question type loads and find the techniques that work for you. I think I've covered the main stuff, but if you have any further questions or want any section specific advice don't hesitate to ask :smile:

This - especially the time management strategies bit, is phenomenal!
Reply 11
Original post by premedMM
Thank you, did you find the ucat question banks helpful aswell?

You're very welcome, and to be honest I didn't actually use the official ucat bank because of the lack of timer/stats/feedback but they will of course be very accurate so a good resource nevertheless.

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