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Harvard in-text-citations - is this correct?

The passage Im trying to cite looks like this:
"Historians sometimes refer to this as reconstructing the “voice” of the source (Decker, 2013; Evans, 2000)." - This is in an article by other authors and if I want to cite this in my work, is it smth like this?

(Decker 2013; Evans 2000, cited in Kipping et al. 2013)

Idk what to write because the referencing guide my uni gave us doesn't show anything like this.
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 1
I'm struggling to work out your exact question.

If you're citing an actual quote from other's work I would separate out the reference and add some sort of connective substation to the wider point e.g. "bla bla bla" (Smith, 2020, p.xx) which is supported by the available literature (John, 2020; Paul et. al 2017) to make it clear which source the quotation is actually taken from.

If you're questioning if you should reference the reference i.e. Smith makes a point or quote and references John, how you approach that depends on the level you're working at. Broadly for Master's level and below, you can just cite the paper you got it from, i.e. Smith and ignore the chain of references. For PHD level however you need to reference the original.

In your case it looks like you would just say ""Historians sometimes refer to this as reconstructing the “voice” of the source" (Kipping et al. 2013, p. XX). Also don't forget to comment on the recency of a source, typically outside of 10 years is deemed out of date unless you can explain why.
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 2
Original post by Nice_100
The passage Im trying to cite looks like this:
"Historians sometimes refer to this as reconstructing the “voice” of the source (Decker, 2013; Evans, 2000)." - This is in an article by other authors and if I want to cite this in my work, is it smth like this?
(Decker 2013; Evans 2000, cited in Kipping et al. 2013)
Idk what to write because the referencing guide my uni gave us doesn't show anything like this.

The easiest thing is using Endnote - your university library should provide you with a registration key so you should be able to use this product free of charge.
Reply 3
Original post by Nice_100
The passage Im trying to cite looks like this:
"Historians sometimes refer to this as reconstructing the “voice” of the source (Decker, 2013; Evans, 2000)." - This is in an article by other authors and if I want to cite this in my work, is it smth like this?
(Decker 2013; Evans 2000, cited in Kipping et al. 2013)
Idk what to write because the referencing guide my uni gave us doesn't show anything like this.

University of Auckland has a website called "QuickCite" which you can use to check the format of commonly used citation style:

https://www.cite.auckland.ac.nz/2.html

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