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helppp - medicine

I'm currently studying my first year at UOM and now I want to do medicine. I believe i can switch to a bioscience at UOM and then do graduate entry medicine or apply to the STP but that seems sooo long. (7 years minimum). Should I finish first year and apply in 2024? I'm also concerned for financing and whether graduate entry medicine will still be around when i graduate. Anyone got experience/ advice?
A levels- A*AAB
Thank you for any help.
(edited 1 month ago)
Hey there, thanks for posting a question in the Medicine forum. :biggrin:

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The "Which Medical School Should I Apply To?" Uberthread
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Medicine A-Level subjects queries
Work Experience and Voluntary Work

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Official Undergraduate Medicine 2023 Entry
Graduate Entry Medicine 2023 Entry
Medicine 2023 entry for resit / retake / gap year applicants
A100 Medicine for International Students 2023 Entry
Medicine Interview discussion 2023 Entry
2023 entry A100 / A101 Medicine fastest and slowest offer senders
Index of Individual Medical School Applicants' threads 2023 Entry

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Graduate Entry Medicine 2024 Entry
GAMSAT 2024 / 2025 entry discussions megathread
UCAT 2024 Entry Discussions Megathread

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Graduate Entry Medicine 2025 Entry
Official Undergraduate Medicine 2025 Entry

Useful Articles:
GCSE Requirements for Medicine
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Medicine Personal Statement Advice
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Reply 2
Original post by helpm
I'm currently studying my first year at UOM and now I want to do medicine. I believe i can switch to a bioscience at UOM and then do graduate entry medicine or apply to the STP but that seems sooo long. (7 years minimum). Should I finish first year and apply in 2024? I'm also concerned for financing and whether graduate entry medicine will still be around when i graduate. Anyone got experience/ advice?
A levels- A*AAB
Thank you for any help.

What are you studying now? What are your A level subjects? What are your GCSE grades? Why do you suddenly feel you want to do medicine?
We need more info to be able to advise.
Some med schools will not accept applications from those in the first year of a degree course, but there are likely to be options, if you have the right A levels, GCSEs and get a good UCAT score
Reply 3
Original post by GANFYD
What are you studying now? What are your A level subjects? What are your GCSE grades? Why do you suddenly feel you want to do medicine?
We need more info to be able to advise.
Some med schools will not accept applications from those in the first year of a degree course, but there are likely to be options, if you have the right A levels, GCSEs and get a good UCAT score

Hi. I am currently studying Earth sciences but i dont think its right for me. I did biology, chemistry, geography and physics. My GCSES are 8-8 combined science, 7 maths, 7-6 english, and then a bunch of 8s and 7s and 6s. I changed my mind because I want a goal to work towards while also helping people etc. however i havent done the UCAT. What would the options be?
Original post by helpm
Hi. I am currently studying Earth sciences but i dont think its right for me. I did biology, chemistry, geography and physics. My GCSES are 8-8 combined science, 7 maths, 7-6 english, and then a bunch of 8s and 7s and 6s. I changed my mind because I want a goal to work towards while also helping people etc. however i havent done the UCAT. What would the options be?

Note that many GEM courses will accept graduates of any science degree, including earth sciences.

Bear in mind the STP is not medicine and is an entirely separate career route. It does not lead to qualifying as a medical doctor and I am skeptical of whether it would make any specific difference in applying to medicine later (compared to just getting other clinical work experience in the NHS for a similar amount of time).

Note that you can "help people" in a huge number of career areas. Even specifically within the earth sciences regime, doing research or other work on e.g. climate science, geohazards, etc, can actually help people on a much larger magnitude than many (most?) medical specialties (except perhaps public health medicine) in fact. Also plenty of scope to work with charitable bodies/NGOs relating to environmental and perhaps ecological/biodiversity matters. So that might be something to bear in mind.

Not to mention non-earth science related roles (since most graduates go into jobs unrelated to their degrees) in NGOs and charities (I know someone who after doing a geography degree worked in NGOs that focused on helping refugees and providing food aid to countries with severe famines).

Obviously if you have other issues with the content of the degree it's worth considering your options. But if the main issue is that you feel it won't lead to you "helping people" then you certainly have options still.
Reply 5
Original post by artful_lounger
Note that many GEM courses will accept graduates of any science degree, including earth sciences.
Bear in mind the STP is not medicine and is an entirely separate career route. It does not lead to qualifying as a medical doctor and I am skeptical of whether it would make any specific difference in applying to medicine later (compared to just getting other clinical work experience in the NHS for a similar amount of time).
Note that you can "help people" in a huge number of career areas. Even specifically within the earth sciences regime, doing research or other work on e.g. climate science, geohazards, etc, can actually help people on a much larger magnitude than many (most?) medical specialties (except perhaps public health medicine) in fact. Also plenty of scope to work with charitable bodies/NGOs relating to environmental and perhaps ecological/biodiversity matters. So that might be something to bear in mind.
Not to mention non-earth science related roles (since most graduates go into jobs unrelated to their degrees) in NGOs and charities (I know someone who after doing a geography degree worked in NGOs that focused on helping refugees and providing food aid to countries with severe famines).
Obviously if you have other issues with the content of the degree it's worth considering your options. But if the main issue is that you feel it won't lead to you "helping people" then you certainly have options still.

Thank you for your response, i know that the STP is completely seperate from medicine and i thought it also looked very interesting. The current issue I have with my course is that its very similar to physical geography rather than a more "STEM" subject. Therefore i am planning on switching to either chem or bio either way as I believe they will open up more scientific futures, and also I enjoy being challenged.
Original post by helpm
Thank you for your response, i know that the STP is completely seperate from medicine and i thought it also looked very interesting. The current issue I have with my course is that its very similar to physical geography rather than a more "STEM" subject. Therefore i am planning on switching to either chem or bio either way as I believe they will open up more scientific futures, and also I enjoy being challenged.

Earth sciences very much is a STEM subject - perhaps chat with some of the upper year students to get a feel how the course develops? While there is of course overlap in topics, earth sciences definitely normally involves a lot more maths and science material to my knowledge. Stuff like geochemistry, crystallography, earth mechanics and so on.
Reply 7
Original post by artful_lounger
Earth sciences very much is a STEM subject - perhaps chat with some of the upper year students to get a feel how the course develops? While there is of course overlap in topics, earth sciences definitely normally involves a lot more maths and science material to my knowledge. Stuff like geochemistry, crystallography, earth mechanics and so on.

I think my course is more applied. I also want to do a course where there is perhaps more clear cut answers, with perhaps more flexibility. Its also very much as if we are not studying the underlying science behind certain processes. I want a degree where I feel challenged and am learning complex stuff I cannot learn independently. I have chatted with upper year students but I feel as earth sciences takes in a broad range of people getting everyone to the same level has taken a while.
Original post by helpm
I think my course is more applied. I also want to do a course where there is perhaps more clear cut answers, with perhaps more flexibility. Its also very much as if we are not studying the underlying science behind certain processes. I want a degree where I feel challenged and am learning complex stuff I cannot learn independently. I have chatted with upper year students but I feel as earth sciences takes in a broad range of people getting everyone to the same level has taken a while.

That's pretty common for a lot of degrees. I also think medicine probably has fewer clear cut answers than the alternatives! If you wanted more clear cut answers I'd suggest moving away from that bioscience/medical route and more towards the physical sciences or engineering. And earth sciences is in the latter spectrum.
Reply 9
Original post by helpm
Hi. I am currently studying Earth sciences but i dont think its right for me. I did biology, chemistry, geography and physics. My GCSES are 8-8 combined science, 7 maths, 7-6 english, and then a bunch of 8s and 7s and 6s. I changed my mind because I want a goal to work towards while also helping people etc. however i havent done the UCAT. What would the options be?

I am not gonna get into the right career to be doing, as @artful_lounger is much better at that sort of thing than me!

If you have A*AA in bio, chem and geography, you are good to go for medicine without completing your degree, if you want to. You will have used your "grace year" by doing first year of a degree, and like I say, some med schools will not accept those on the first year of a degree, but if you get a good UCAT, you should be OK.
I would say see if you can do some work experience and volunteering, as you will need that for interviews/PS, but it will also help you to know if it is what you want to do. Sit the UCAT this summer and you can apply in Oct.

Edinburgh, Aberdeen, UEA, Manchester, Keele, Cardiff, Leeds, Liverpool, Barts, Aston, UCL, Sheffield would not accept an application if not in the final year of a degree (when you would be treated as a grad, not a school leaver). Birmingham say must have withdrawn and to discuss reasons for this before applying. But they sometimes change this, so do check carefully before you apply.

It is important to apply to your strengths, eg Manchester need 7 x 7/A at GCSE then shortlist on UCAT, so if you only have 6 GCSEs at the right grade, do not apply. Cardiff shortlist primarily on GCSEs. Other places just UCAT. So do not make decisions until you have your stats in hand and then whittle numbers down, but with a good UCAT, you should have more than 4 options
Reply 10
Original post by GANFYD
I am not gonna get into the right career to be doing, as @artful_lounger is much better at that sort of thing than me!
If you have A*AA in bio, chem and geography, you are good to go for medicine without completing your degree, if you want to. You will have used your "grace year" by doing first year of a degree, and like I say, some med schools will not accept those on the first year of a degree, but if you get a good UCAT, you should be OK.
I would say see if you can do some work experience and volunteering, as you will need that for interviews/PS, but it will also help you to know if it is what you want to do. Sit the UCAT this summer and you can apply in Oct.
Edinburgh, Aberdeen, UEA, Manchester, Keele, Cardiff, Leeds, Liverpool, Barts, Aston, UCL, Sheffield would not accept an application if not in the final year of a degree (when you would be treated as a grad, not a school leaver). Birmingham say must have withdrawn and to discuss reasons for this before applying. But they sometimes change this, so do check carefully before you apply.
It is important to apply to your strengths, eg Manchester need 7 x 7/A at GCSE then shortlist on UCAT, so if you only have 6 GCSEs at the right grade, do not apply. Cardiff shortlist primarily on GCSEs. Other places just UCAT. So do not make decisions until you have your stats in hand and then whittle numbers down, but with a good UCAT, you should have more than 4 options

Sorry, are you saying that Edinburgh, Abderdeen etc do not accept an application if i drop out of uni? Im just concerned that no uni will take me because it would have been two years since my a levels were completed.
Reply 11
Original post by artful_lounger
That's pretty common for a lot of degrees. I also think medicine probably has fewer clear cut answers than the alternatives! If you wanted more clear cut answers I'd suggest moving away from that bioscience/medical route and more towards the physical sciences or engineering. And earth sciences is in the latter spectrum.
yepp I have been looking at them subjects but unfortunately I have no A level maths qualification. I might call up departments though and see if they can consider the maths i've completed in my first year. Thank you for helping! I'm also concerned with medicine about how gross stuff might be but im not scared of blood or anything lol. Mostly just like guts and squishy stuff and skeletons.
Original post by helpm
yepp I have been looking at them subjects but unfortunately I have no A level maths qualification. I might call up departments though and see if they can consider the maths i've completed in my first year. Thank you for helping! I'm also concerned with medicine about how gross stuff might be but im not scared of blood or anything lol. Mostly just like guts and squishy stuff and skeletons.

I think honestly you might be over-extrapolating from the first year to what the rest of the degree will be like - invariably with any degree which does not directly follow from an A-level there is a fair bit of getting everyone onto the same level with things (this also happens with degrees that do directly follow from A-levels but perhaps not to the same extent).

Have you spoken with your personal tutor about your concerns with your degree? As they will be very familiar with the content of the course in later years and how students experience them. They might be able to give you a better idea of things. They're also probably your best bet to discuss potentially changing courses at your current uni as well anyway!
Reply 13
Original post by helpm
Sorry, are you saying that Edinburgh, Abderdeen etc do not accept an application if i drop out of uni? Im just concerned that no uni will take me because it would have been two years since my a levels were completed.

Are you definitevely planning to drop out? As the majority of people who apply get all rejections for medicine.
They may accept you if you drop put, but would not if you are doing another degree and not in your final year - and as I say, then you would be assessed as a grad, not a school leaver.
No med schools mind 2 yrs since your A levels, but some can get twitchy if it is longer than this.
Reply 14
Original post by GANFYD
Are you definitevely planning to drop out? As the majority of people who apply get all rejections for medicine.
They may accept you if you drop put, but would not if you are doing another degree and not in your final year - and as I say, then you would be assessed as a grad, not a school leaver.
No med schools mind 2 yrs since your A levels, but some can get twitchy if it is longer than this.

I think I've decided to study one of material science and engineering, Biosciences(genetics, pharma, etc), or chem! I looked into pharmacy a bit but im not sure because many say they arent satisfied by their job and its oversaturated.
Reply 15
Original post by helpm
I think I've decided to study one of material science and engineering, Biosciences(genetics, pharma, etc), or chem! I looked into pharmacy a bit but im not sure because many say they arent satisfied by their job and its oversaturated.


Good luck with whatever you choose 🙂

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