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Considering a second gap year after retaking

Hi, I’m resitting my A levels this year (maths, physics and further maths) and I’m self-learning and not in school, and I didn’t get the offers I wanted and I’m considering to take another gap year to get the uni i want, currently have an offer from university of Nottingham, brunel and university of Glasgow, but honestly feel like going to higher ranked uni because I feel like I’m putting in a lot of hard work and feel like I deserve to go to a higher rank university like imperial for mech eng (not saying all the unis I got an offer from are bad unis they’re good). So would it be a good idea to take another gap year or not?
Original post by abzzzolute
Hi, I’m resitting my A levels this year (maths, physics and further maths) and I’m self-learning and not in school, and I didn’t get the offers I wanted and I’m considering to take another gap year to get the uni i want, currently have an offer from university of Nottingham, brunel and university of Glasgow, but honestly feel like going to higher ranked uni because I feel like I’m putting in a lot of hard work and feel like I deserve to go to a higher rank university like imperial for mech eng (not saying all the unis I got an offer from are bad unis they’re good). So would it be a good idea to take another gap year or not?

Without specifics it's hard to offer any useful advice, unfortunately. For example, both of the scenarios below match what you've written but would elicit very different advice.

Scenario 1
You struggle a bit with all three subjects, but your school decided to predict you at A*A*A* anyway, to give you the best chance of some decent offers. You worked really hard and managed to get BBB; unfortunately this wasn't enough for the offer conditions you received. You're self-studying this year, and feel sure that you'll do well (that's just a gut feeling, despite the past papers you've done not going quite as well as you'd have hoped).

Scenario 2
You're very good at all three subjects, were predicted A*A*A*, and received offers from each "higher rank university" to which you applied. Unfortunately, due to circumstances beyond your control (e.g. health issues during year 13) your A levels didn't go to plan, and you just missed your offer conditions. You didn't mention your extenuating circumstances in your new UCAS application, so none of the universities know why your A levels grades were a mix of As and Bs (when they're looking for A*s). Given that they have plenty of A*A*A* predicted candidates to choose from, they decided not to make you an offer.

The best approach would be to make your firm/insurance choice based upon the offers you have and then see what happens on results day. If you end up with grades which meet the offers you have, but don't meet the likely offers from Imperial (or wherever) then just accept your fate and join your firm/insurance. If, however, you get grades which give you a good chance of the offers you crave, then you could decline the place you have and reapply with your actual grades. This is still a risk, as you may still not get the offers you want despite the fact that you feel that you "deserve to go to a higher rank university".
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia
Without specifics it's hard to offer any useful advice, unfortunately. For example, both of the scenarios below match what you've written but would elicit very different advice.
Scenario 1
You struggle a bit with all three subjects, but your school decided to predict you at A*A*A* anyway, to give you the best chance of some decent offers. You worked really hard and managed to get BBB; unfortunately this wasn't enough for the offer conditions you received. You're self-studying this year, and feel sure that you'll do well (that's just a gut feeling, despite the past papers you've done not going quite as well as you'd have hoped).
Scenario 2
You're very good at all three subjects, were predicted A*A*A*, and received offers from each "higher rank university" to which you applied. Unfortunately, due to circumstances beyond your control (e.g. health issues during year 13) your A levels didn't go to plan, and you just missed your offer conditions. You didn't mention your extenuating circumstances in your new UCAS application, so none of the universities know why your A levels grades were a mix of As and Bs (when they're looking for A*s). Given that they have plenty of A*A*A* predicted candidates to choose from, they decided not to make you an offer.
The best approach would be to make your firm/insurance choice based upon the offers you have and then see what happens on results day. If you end up with grades which meet the offers you have, but don't meet the likely offers from Imperial (or wherever) then just accept your fate and join your firm/insurance. If, however, you get grades which give you a good chance of the offers you crave, then you could decline the place you have and reapply with your actual grades. This is still a risk, as you may still not get the offers you want despite the fact that you feel that you "deserve to go to a higher rank university".

Thank you

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