The Student Room Group

Boots pay bias

I am a 23 year old pharmacy advisor and I am on £12.87 and hour, colleagues with the same job title have much higher pay. Some have even started working after me and are on £14 + salary. I’m shocked that boots negotiate and can change payment. I thought what was advertised is advertised as pay. I also get only £1 extra from retail staff when I have to deal with high risk medicine, and clinical advice….
Original post by Anonymous
I am a 23 year old pharmacy advisor and I am on £12.87 and hour, colleagues with the same job title have much higher pay. Some have even started working after me and are on £14 + salary. I’m shocked that boots negotiate and can change payment. I thought what was advertised is advertised as pay. I also get only £1 extra from retail staff when I have to deal with high risk medicine, and clinical advice….

You've provide two criteria when comparing yourself with those who are paid more: the fact that you share the same job title, and the fact that they started after you (well, some of them did).

What other criteria might be at play here? Are the other people older than you? Do they have more experience that you? Are they better qualified than you? Did they simply negotiate better pay when they joined?

If none of those apply, then raise the issue with Boots and ask for an explanation?
Original post by Catlova67
I didn’t realise you can negotiate pay better, when I started I was 19 and a customer assistance contract despite working in the pharmacy. My colleges didn’t need to train because they were already pharmacists from other countries, but as of now we have the same title and job to do, I actually do more tasks than them at work. I do only have a 6 hour contract though part time and they are all full time.

Well, I don't know whether you can successfully negotiate your rate of pay at Boots either. However, one of the following (or potentially both) must be true:

1. Your rate of pay is determined by some fixed formula or calculation which might involve your job title, your qualifications, your length of service, your age, etc. If this is the case, you just need to ask how your rate of pay is calculated, as you'll then understand why you're being paid less that your colleagues.

2. Your rate of pay is determined by no fixed rules meaning they will pay each individual as little as they can, and it is up to each individual to negotiate that figure upwards. If this is the case, you can attempt to negotiate you pay upwards on the basis that your colleagues are being paid more than you despite the fact that you "do more tasks than them at work."

They fact that your colleagues are actually qualified pharmacists (albeit not in the UK) is likely key. Do you really think that you should be paid the same as them? Are you a qualified pharmacist? (The fact they they have the same job title as you is almost certainly down to the fact they their pharmacy qualifications were not gained in the UK, rather than being a reflection of their knowledge or ability.)

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