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Biology - homeostasis

sounds like a silly question but during homeostasis- the arterioles become smaller in vasoconstriction leading to decreased volume of blood reaching the surface of the capillaries but the textbook states that most of the blood entering the skin passes beneath an insulating layer of fat - could someone please explain what is happening from a more visual approach?
thanks
Reply 1
Original post by Lebkuchen
sounds like a silly question but during homeostasis- the arterioles become smaller in vasoconstriction leading to decreased volume of blood reaching the surface of the capillaries but the textbook states that most of the blood entering the skin passes beneath an insulating layer of fat - could someone please explain what is happening from a more visual approach?
thanks

what I'm asking is - do the arterioles go directly to the venules without having to come into contact with the capillaries?
Reply 2
Hi! I kind of get what you are trying to ask but I am still a bit confused, so I will try to answer as best as I can. The vessels normally connect like this: arteries -> arterioles -> capillaries -> venules -> veins. So the arterioles have to go to the capillaries before reaching the venules. They can't bypass the capillaries, as the capillaries is involved in exchange of substances. However I can't really help with regard to the textbook explanation as I'm not exactly sure what you are asking. Hope this helps!

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