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Grade 9 essay on how gerald is presented in an inspector calls

Please help with an example of a grade 9 essay of how gerald is presented in an inspector calls
Never write about Gerald unless you literally have no choice.
Here's one my teacher wrote:

Question: How far does Priestley present Gerald as an immoral
(not doing the right thing) character?
Intro:
What: J.B Priestley uses his play An Inspector Calls to
display the idea that all active members of society
should accept social responsibility.
How: Priestley communicates this notion through his character
Gerald, who despite not accepting his wrongdoings, is not conveyed
as the most reprehensible member of the upper class cohort of
characters within the play.
Why: Priestley aims to show his Post-War audience the importance
of having values that account for everybody’s welfare.

Paragraph 1:
S) Firstly, Priestley introduces Gerald as a rather self-assured
character whose confident demeanour is fuelled by Mr Birling’s
desperation to impress the son of “Sir George Croft”. The Inspector
however, impacts this confidence, as he questions Gerald, who
uncomfortably retorts Q)“I don’t come into this suicide business”. I)
This instantly demonstrates to the audience the discomfort that
Gerald is feeling, as his character is questioned. Z1) “I”- personal
pronoun, creating a barrier between the Birling’s and himself. Ironic
because he is marrying into the family. Perhaps indicates an
underlying sense of superiority that he feels as an upper class male.
Z2) “Don’t”- trying to assume some control of situation but he
cannot. “This suicide”- knows Eva’s name but depersonalises/
dehumanises, to avoid taking responsibility. Cold attitude.
Z3) Semantic field “business”- uses business terminology, sees
everything as transactional, just like his relationship with Eva.
Context) Priestley deliberately constructs Gerald in this manner to
highlight the Laissez Faire, nonchalance of the upper classes.
Priestley was of course, very much aware of this, as he was a
founding member of the early Labour Party, who established the
welfare state. The very purpose of this, was to support those in need
amongst society, in particular those like Eva, who the likes of Gerald
would have mistreated for their own benefit without a conscience.

Paragraph 2:
S) Despite not being the worst character within the play, because of the slight
happiness that he provided Eva for a period of time, Gerald’s lack of acceptable
in regards to his input towards her death, still makes him a rather unlikeable
individual. Q) This is shown through his justification “we’re respectable
citizens, and not dangerous criminals” I) revealing how he sees himself to be a
pillar (example) of respectability in society. Zoom 1- “We’re respectable
citizens” indicates how he is aware of being a member of the upper class and
understands how his behaviour needs to model admirability (high standards)
as an example to others. Zoom 2- “We’re respectable citizens”- Additionally,
this can be perceived (seen) as a form of irony deliberately (on purpose) used
by Priestley because the behaviour of the upper classes shown is exploitative
(treat people badly- Eva Smith) and borders on evil. (malign) Zoom 3- “Not
dangerous criminals”- One might further postulate how Gerald uses this link to
crime as a way of reminding the Inspector of how he believed his actions were
worthy because he saved Eva for a period of time and allowed her to escape
from her awful situation. Again, Priestley constructs Gerald in this way to
remind his audience of how Gerald might not have hurt Eva deliberately, but
still did so because his position in society reminded him that he was
superior. Context- Priestley deliberately presents Gerald in this impartial
(middle) way to highlight how his character represents key people in society.
Gerald helps Eva, however he temporarily helps her, and as a result she is
forced to return to her awful life. Priestley draws attention to this to show his
audience how there are members of the upper class who are not traditionalists
and can be swayed thus (so) can be seen as ‘swing voter’. He is suggesting that
as a character Gerald represents the members of the upper class who can be
apart of social change by taking responsibility.
Original post by arrowinthewoods
Never write about Gerald unless you literally have no choice.
Here's one my teacher wrote:
Question: How far does Priestley present Gerald as an immoral
(not doing the right thing) character?
Intro:
What: J.B Priestley uses his play An Inspector Calls to
display the idea that all active members of society
should accept social responsibility.
How: Priestley communicates this notion through his character
Gerald, who despite not accepting his wrongdoings, is not conveyed
as the most reprehensible member of the upper class cohort of
characters within the play.
Why: Priestley aims to show his Post-War audience the importance
of having values that account for everybody’s welfare.
Paragraph 1:
S) Firstly, Priestley introduces Gerald as a rather self-assured
character whose confident demeanour is fuelled by Mr Birling’s
desperation to impress the son of “Sir George Croft”. The Inspector
however, impacts this confidence, as he questions Gerald, who
uncomfortably retorts Q)“I don’t come into this suicide business”. I)
This instantly demonstrates to the audience the discomfort that
Gerald is feeling, as his character is questioned. Z1) “I”- personal
pronoun, creating a barrier between the Birling’s and himself. Ironic
because he is marrying into the family. Perhaps indicates an
underlying sense of superiority that he feels as an upper class male.
Z2) “Don’t”- trying to assume some control of situation but he
cannot. “This suicide”- knows Eva’s name but depersonalises/
dehumanises, to avoid taking responsibility. Cold attitude.
Z3) Semantic field “business”- uses business terminology, sees
everything as transactional, just like his relationship with Eva.
Context) Priestley deliberately constructs Gerald in this manner to
highlight the Laissez Faire, nonchalance of the upper classes.
Priestley was of course, very much aware of this, as he was a
founding member of the early Labour Party, who established the
welfare state. The very purpose of this, was to support those in need
amongst society, in particular those like Eva, who the likes of Gerald
would have mistreated for their own benefit without a conscience.
Paragraph 2:
S) Despite not being the worst character within the play, because of the slight
happiness that he provided Eva for a period of time, Gerald’s lack of acceptable
in regards to his input towards her death, still makes him a rather unlikeable
individual. Q) This is shown through his justification “we’re respectable
citizens, and not dangerous criminals” I) revealing how he sees himself to be a
pillar (example) of respectability in society. Zoom 1- “We’re respectable
citizens” indicates how he is aware of being a member of the upper class and
understands how his behaviour needs to model admirability (high standards)
as an example to others. Zoom 2- “We’re respectable citizens”- Additionally,
this can be perceived (seen) as a form of irony deliberately (on purpose) used
by Priestley because the behaviour of the upper classes shown is exploitative
(treat people badly- Eva Smith) and borders on evil. (malign) Zoom 3- “Not
dangerous criminals”- One might further postulate how Gerald uses this link to
crime as a way of reminding the Inspector of how he believed his actions were
worthy because he saved Eva for a period of time and allowed her to escape
from her awful situation. Again, Priestley constructs Gerald in this way to
remind his audience of how Gerald might not have hurt Eva deliberately, but
still did so because his position in society reminded him that he was
superior. Context- Priestley deliberately presents Gerald in this impartial
(middle) way to highlight how his character represents key people in society.
Gerald helps Eva, however he temporarily helps her, and as a result she is
forced to return to her awful life. Priestley draws attention to this to show his
audience how there are members of the upper class who are not traditionalists
and can be swayed thus (so) can be seen as ‘swing voter’. He is suggesting that
as a character Gerald represents the members of the upper class who can be
apart of social change by taking responsibility.

Thank you ☺️
Original post by decisive-lacquer
Thank you ☺️

You're welcome. Good luck in your revision.

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