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(BSc + MSc) vs MPhys

I am halfway through my third year of my physics with philosophy integrated master's, and it occurred to me that maybe graduating with a BSc in Physics with Philosophy and then doing an MSc in Physics could look better than just a single MPhys in Physics with Philosophy. Do you think this makes sense, or would they both be regarded equally by future employers?

I am not sure if I wanna go into academia or industry, or research (not sure if that's considered separate to the previous two or not), so I suppose I'm asking how it would be considered across all these domains.
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 1
im a y12 student so not the best person to answer lol
maybe try posting this in the postgrad forum
Original post by Jhoey
I am halfway through my third year of my physics with philosophy integrated master's, and it occurred to me that maybe graduating with a BSc in Physics with Philosophy and then doing an MSc in Physics could look better than just a single MPhys in Physics with Philosophy. Do you think this makes sense, or would they both be regarded equally by future employers?
I am not sure if I wanna go into academia or industry, or research (not sure if that's considered separate to the previous two or not), so I suppose I'm asking how it would be considered across all these domains.

Hiya,

I'm a current 3rd year astrophysics and cosmolgy student at Lancaster Uni and can recommend a few things for you to think about regarding your future and what masters to go for, I understand it is a struggle!!

First off, I believe employers would regard a masters in either choice equally, depending on what type of job you would like to apply for in the future. If it is fully physics, it might be worth just doing a masters in that, without philosophy, however personal choice also plays a key role and I think you should prioritise what you would like to do / what you think you would enjoy more. Exploring your interests and your passion is more important for you to get through your final year but if you are in favour of doing either, then you should have a look at future employability and what skills you may need for a career you wish to pursue.

Both options would be attractive to employers but, as mentioned before, it would depend on the specific requirements of the job. Some employers may prefer specialised knowledge and skills acquired through a straight physics master's, while others may value the interdisciplinary background and critical thinking abilities gained from a combined physics and philosophy program. It might be worth talking to lecturers / professors in your department(s) and seeing what skills / knowledge would be required in your desired field you would like to pursue.

Considering depth vs breadth is another side to it. Graduating with a BSc followed by an MSc allows you to delve deeper into physics with specialised research and can be advantageous if you're particularly interested in a specific area of physics and want to develop expertise. On the other hand, completing a single MPhys degree provides a broad foundation in both physics and philosophy, which may be beneficial if you're interested in exploring various career paths or interdisciplinary paths.

Overall, seeing how your decision will affect your long time career path and what it is you would like to take from your final year is the main thing. Definitely seek guidance from thosse in relevant positions within your department(s) and whichever one you choose, you could still apply to any job that suits a science or physics background, regardless if you are choosing to continue with philosophy or not.

I hope this helps and if you have any other questions, feel free to ask.
Wishing you all the best for your third year!

-- Arya (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)
Reply 3
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hiya,
I'm a current 3rd year astrophysics and cosmolgy student at Lancaster Uni and can recommend a few things for you to think about regarding your future and what masters to go for, I understand it is a struggle!!
First off, I believe employers would regard a masters in either choice equally, depending on what type of job you would like to apply for in the future. If it is fully physics, it might be worth just doing a masters in that, without philosophy, however personal choice also plays a key role and I think you should prioritise what you would like to do / what you think you would enjoy more. Exploring your interests and your passion is more important for you to get through your final year but if you are in favour of doing either, then you should have a look at future employability and what skills you may need for a career you wish to pursue.
Both options would be attractive to employers but, as mentioned before, it would depend on the specific requirements of the job. Some employers may prefer specialised knowledge and skills acquired through a straight physics master's, while others may value the interdisciplinary background and critical thinking abilities gained from a combined physics and philosophy program. It might be worth talking to lecturers / professors in your department(s) and seeing what skills / knowledge would be required in your desired field you would like to pursue.
Considering depth vs breadth is another side to it. Graduating with a BSc followed by an MSc allows you to delve deeper into physics with specialised research and can be advantageous if you're particularly interested in a specific area of physics and want to develop expertise. On the other hand, completing a single MPhys degree provides a broad foundation in both physics and philosophy, which may be beneficial if you're interested in exploring various career paths or interdisciplinary paths.
Overall, seeing how your decision will affect your long time career path and what it is you would like to take from your final year is the main thing. Definitely seek guidance from thosse in relevant positions within your department(s) and whichever one you choose, you could still apply to any job that suits a science or physics background, regardless if you are choosing to continue with philosophy or not.
I hope this helps and if you have any other questions, feel free to ask.
Wishing you all the best for your third year!
-- Arya (Lancaster University Student Ambassador)

Thank you so much for your detailed response! This is the best advice I've received. I think I will stick with the MPhys course! Thank you.

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