The Student Room Group

Low gcse maths grade, could I still do architecture?

I’m currently studying art, politics and sociology a level and am working at AAB currently, I’m stuck at the moment between doing a politics or architecture degree, I only achieved a 5 in gcses maths :frown: . I’ve been looking at Landscape architecture at Sheffield and the grade requirements aren’t too bad (ABB) but I’m not sure what other unis would be achievable, most others i have checked out require at least a 6 in gcse maths.Is doing architecture unrealistic and i should just do politics instead or are there any other courses that i could do?
Sorry if this is the wrong forum I wasn’t sure which one to put it on
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 1
Original post by emmafmarlow
I’m currently studying art, politics and sociology a level and am working at AAB currently, I’m stuck at the moment between doing a politics or architecture degree, I only achieved a 5 in gcses maths :frown: . I’ve been looking at Landscape architecture at Sheffield and the grade requirements aren’t too bad (ABB) but I’m not sure what other unis would be achievable, most others i have checked out require at least a 6 in gcse maths.Is doing architecture unrealistic and i should just do politics instead or are there any other courses that i could do?
Sorry if this is the wrong forum I wasn’t sure which one to put it on

If you are aiming for Russell Group universities, I would assume that most require at least a 6 in GCSE maths. I would suggest looking into non-Russell Group universities, as the requirements for architecture might be lower and they would probably be more lenient. Lancaster is a highly ranked non-Russell Group university and they only ask for AAA at A level with no specific GCSE requirements. It might even be lower for contextual offers. Loughborough is another great one for architecture and they only ask for GCSE maths and English at grade 4 for 2025 entry to their BArch course. It's definitely doable, you just might need to start researching universities outside the Russell Group, as they tend to follow the same standards. These are also respectable institutions and for Loughborough specifically, they are ranked 4th in Architecture in the Complete University Guide. If architecture is your dream, I would try and focus more on A level grades and demonstrating your interest through a strong personal statement.

Here are some Russell Group Universities that require a 5 or below for their architecture course:
https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/studywithus/ugstudy/courses/UG/Architecture-BArch-Hons-U6UATTRE.html
https://www.manchester.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/2025/00178/ba-architecture/entry-requirements/#course-profile

Here are some top 20 non-Russell Group universities for architecture according to the Complete University Guide - none of which require a 5 in GCSE maths (in order of highest ranked to lowest):
https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/architecture-barch/
https://courses.uwe.ac.uk/K100/architecture#entry
https://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/architecture
https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/undergraduate/4/architecture
https://www.arts.ac.uk/subjects/architecture-spatial-and-interior-design/undergraduate/ba-hons-architecture-csm#application-process

These are some other sources I used that you may find useful:
https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/architecture-ba-hons-k100/2025/#course-entry
https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/league-tables/rankings/architecture

I wish you the best of luck on your journey to architecture as a fellow Year 12 politics student!
This is exactly the point of going to Uni Open Days - listening to the subject presentations may make you realise that you do like that subject better than another, or actually it wasnt what you though about at all. I always advise applicants to sign up for at least two different subjects for Open Days, and to always look at subjects 'like' that is case this might be a better fit than the subject they first thought of.

Here are some slightly left field suggestions that might interest you instead of or as well as a binary divide between Politics and Architecture :
BSc Geography and Urban and Regional Planning Joint Honours - undergraduate degree course - LK74 - School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences - University of Birmingham
Urban Planning, Design and Management BSc | The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis - UCL University College London
Social and Political Sciences BSc | University of Leeds
etc
Original post by username6911129
I’m currently studying art, politics and sociology a level and am working at AAB currently, I’m stuck at the moment between doing a politics or architecture degree, I only achieved a 5 in gcses maths :frown: . I’ve been looking at Landscape architecture at Sheffield and the grade requirements aren’t too bad (ABB) but I’m not sure what other unis would be achievable, most others i have checked out require at least a 6 in gcse maths.Is doing architecture unrealistic and i should just do politics instead or are there any other courses that i could do?
Sorry if this is the wrong forum I wasn’t sure which one to put it on

its really important that you take time to think through your uni decision. if this involves taking a gap year, that is what you need to do. i really cannot stress enough that picking one course over another because of the entry requirements is a bad idea.
architecture and politics are two extremely different degrees leading to two extremely different outcomes. I have deliberated between the two myself, but you absolutely must be more confident in your decision by the time you come to apply. there is no shame whatsoever in a gap year and I am suggesting this could be the correct route to tae for now whilst you set your sights on something a little more clearly.
with regards to your GCSE, it is possible that you might be able to resit this exam: your college or sixth form may even offer this. I would ask a member of staff who may be able to advise with regards to your school's policy. that said, uni applications are increasingly based upon individual merit overall, and a 5 at GCSE is unlikely to be restrictive. it may put your mind at ease to call specific universities to confirm this, but if your application is very strong overall (especially in architecture, as the portfolio often forms the most significant part of admissions), an insufficient GCSE grade can be ignored.

have a think and let me know if you have any questions.
(edited 1 month ago)

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending