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how do u know when to say ions/electrons

like sometimes the mark scheme only allows ions or only allows electrons i dont get it help
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Original post by imhomo2017
like sometimes the mark scheme only allows ions or only allows electrons i dont get it help

If you are A level, the below will useful (I think). If not, look in the revision guide (do this anyway if you are A level).

It depends on the situation in question. There is no clear-cut general rule as to when you should say ions or electrons so it's just about understanding the different situations where you need to mention what. I assume you're talking about electrochemistry so here's a rough summary:

The salt bridge is responsible for the transportation of IONS from one solution to the other in addition to the maintenance of charge neutrality. It is normally made of Potassium Nitrate.

The electrical circuit which is used to measure the electromotive force from the redox reaction is responsible for the transportation of ELECTRONS!

Outside of electrochemistry, if something is in solution, we generally mean ions.

If something is a metal, it could be ions OR electrons (lattice of positive ions and sea of delocalised electrons).

If we're talking about bonding, it's the transfer of electrons that causes the formation of ions which then form electrostatic forces of attraction (ionic bonding, covalent bonding and IMF formation like VDW forces, permanent dipole dipole forces when there is a large difference in electronegativity, which is the ability of an atom to withdraw electron density to itself in a covalent bond, between the atoms and hydrogen bonding, which is a specific occurrence of a permanent dipole-dipole force formation between hydrogen atoms and the atoms of oxygen, nitrogen and fluorine.

Hope this was helpful.

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