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uni course med or law ???

im making my list of uni and I have noticed med has higher entry requirements than law (generally from what I've seen) my A-levels are two sciences and geography. im wondering whether I should look at taking law but idk whether ill like it or what. I've always been interested in like "problem solving", resolving issues and crimes so im wondering whether it's worth applying for law aswell as med but I dont want to do it then hate it. does anyone have any advice as to what I can do
If you are not 200% committed to Medicine, choose Law.

If you are still in any doubt, get a job in a care-home over the summer and if that doesn't put you off, you'll know that Med trumps Law.
Reply 2
Original post by McGinger
If you are not 200% committed to Medicine, choose Law.
If you are still in any doubt, get a job in a care-home over the summer and if that doesn't put you off, you'll know that Med trumps Law.

without causing disrespect to either med or law which would you say is more do able
Original post by sg.0
without causing disrespect to either med or law which would you say is more do able

I haven't a clue what you mean be 'do-able'.

If you mean easy then don't bother with either.
Reply 4
Original post by McGinger
I haven't a clue what you mean be 'do-able'.
If you mean easy then don't bother with either.

not what I meant no ? I would have just said easy if that's what I meant
Original post by sg.0
im making my list of uni and I have noticed med has higher entry requirements than law (generally from what I've seen) my A-levels are two sciences and geography. im wondering whether I should look at taking law but idk whether ill like it or what. I've always been interested in like "problem solving", resolving issues and crimes so im wondering whether it's worth applying for law aswell as med but I dont want to do it then hate it. does anyone have any advice as to what I can do

I do Anthropology and Law at LSE but have lots of friends at other unis who do medicine so I'll give you a run-down of my thoughts on the two. Firstly, your subjects shouldn't be an issue when it comes to law applications. Some people think that you HAVE to do three essay subjects to get into a good uni for law but this is simply not the case. Your subjects are perfectly fine and shouldn't put you at a disadvantage, especially if you have a good personal statement that shows you have strong written abilities. However, have you thought about whether your subjects will put you at a disadvantage for med applications? From what I've heard, doing maths is favoured at some unis for med.

Another consideration to make is your chances of getting into a med school, which is something only you can answer. Have you already done work experience in the healthcare sector? Are you likely to get strong A Level predicted grades from your teachers and do you have a good amount of 7+ grades from GCSE? Also have a think about whether you're willing to put in the work to go through med school interviews, especially as you'd only have to do an interview for law if you apply to Oxford/Cambridge. Are you willing to put in the work to get a good UCAT score?

On the other hand, applying for law at uni is considerably less work and it tends to be easier to get into a good law school (think top 10-15) than it is to get into any med school. For KCL, UCL, LSE, Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol and Durham, you'll have to do an entrance test called the LNAT (which is also quite hard) but universities like Nottingham, Warwick, Queen Mary, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds are also seen as pretty good for Law and don't require it.

In terms of content, both law and medicine are hard degrees to do, although the exact difficulty differs depending on the university. Another thing to consider is that law will require a lot more independent study and reading, whereas med is more hands-on. Would you prefer a university experience where you have a less busy timetable but more readings as is the case for law, or hours of lectures and classes but also more practical elements like lab work and patient visits as is the case for med? You're right in thinking that law requires a lot of problem-solving but it also tends to have a lot of theoretical elements. Let's take criminal law for example. Content may range from thinking about why certain groups tend to be found guilty of crimes over others and what could be done to solve this, to what it means it actually means to assault someone. If someone gets on a busy bus and the person next to them accidentally brushes against them is that assault? No, but then you'd weigh up why it isn't even though it involves non-consentual physical contact. Other areas of law that you'll study include contract (so when two individuals/businesses form an agreement and it's breached), property (anything concerning fights over land/building ownership), public/constitutional (focusing on law created by the government instead of courts, including human rights) and tort (when someone believes they have suffered a wrong that isn't contractual or criminal). Law is basically a mix of lots of other subjects, especially politics, history and philosophy.
Reply 6
Original post by poppy2022
I do Anthropology and Law at LSE but have lots of friends at other unis who do medicine so I'll give you a run-down of my thoughts on the two. Firstly, your subjects shouldn't be an issue when it comes to law applications. Some people think that you HAVE to do three essay subjects to get into a good uni for law but this is simply not the case. Your subjects are perfectly fine and shouldn't put you at a disadvantage, especially if you have a good personal statement that shows you have strong written abilities. However, have you thought about whether your subjects will put you at a disadvantage for med applications? From what I've heard, doing maths is favoured at some unis for med.
Another consideration to make is your chances of getting into a med school, which is something only you can answer. Have you already done work experience in the healthcare sector? Are you likely to get strong A Level predicted grades from your teachers and do you have a good amount of 7+ grades from GCSE? Also have a think about whether you're willing to put in the work to go through med school interviews, especially as you'd only have to do an interview for law if you apply to Oxford/Cambridge. Are you willing to put in the work to get a good UCAT score?
On the other hand, applying for law at uni is considerably less work and it tends to be easier to get into a good law school (think top 10-15) than it is to get into any med school. For KCL, UCL, LSE, Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol and Durham, you'll have to do an entrance test called the LNAT (which is also quite hard) but universities like Nottingham, Warwick, Queen Mary, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds are also seen as pretty good for Law and don't require it.
In terms of content, both law and medicine are hard degrees to do, although the exact difficulty differs depending on the university. Another thing to consider is that law will require a lot more independent study and reading, whereas med is more hands-on. Would you prefer a university experience where you have a less busy timetable but more readings as is the case for law, or hours of lectures and classes but also more practical elements like lab work and patient visits as is the case for med? You're right in thinking that law requires a lot of problem-solving but it also tends to have a lot of theoretical elements. Let's take criminal law for example. Content may range from thinking about why certain groups tend to be found guilty of crimes over others and what could be done to solve this, to what it means it actually means to assault someone. If someone gets on a busy bus and the person next to them accidentally brushes against them is that assault? No, but then you'd weigh up why it isn't even though it involves non-consentual physical contact. Other areas of law that you'll study include contract (so when two individuals/businesses form an agreement and it's breached), property (anything concerning fights over land/building ownership), public/constitutional (focusing on law created by the government instead of courts, including human rights) and tort (when someone believes they have suffered a wrong that isn't contractual or criminal). Law is basically a mix of lots of other subjects, especially politics, history and philosophy.

thank you that was really helpful especially as I didn't know much about taking law. i appreciate it
Original post by sg.0
thank you that was really helpful especially as I didn't know much about taking law. i appreciate it

no problem, let me know if you have any more questions !
Reply 8
Original post by sg.0
im making my list of uni and I have noticed med has higher entry requirements than law (generally from what I've seen) my A-levels are two sciences and geography. im wondering whether I should look at taking law but idk whether ill like it or what. I've always been interested in like "problem solving", resolving issues and crimes so im wondering whether it's worth applying for law aswell as med but I dont want to do it then hate it. does anyone have any advice as to what I can do

If you're interested in problem solving and resolving crimes and issues, it sounds that criminology may be more suited to you than law. Law is a very analytical subject and depending on the university you choose, you might not spend a lot of time dealing with criminal law. In a qualifying law degree, you'll have to go through lots of compulsory modules including criminal law, tort law, land law and public law. I would suggest looking into these modules, as well as the optional modules that different university courses offer. You could alternatively do a law and criminology degree, but again, you'll still have to cover the compulsory modules if it is a qualifying law degree.

If entry requirements are the only thing deterring you from medicine, look into foundation years. Law will also have high entry requirements (generally A*AA-AAB) and sometimes universities will require the LNAT (Law National Aptitude Test). While applying to medicine is a more tedious process, applying for law is not going to be much easier. Medicine and law are both very different courses to most degrees in terms of how they are taught. Medicine in first and second year is heavily focused on learning the theory needed for your clinical years. You'll have to do several placements in different areas while studying for exams. Law, to my knowledge, does not have many contact hours and instead you'll have to spend a lot more time than most students actually studying and reading the law in your own time. I think a lot of universities have opted for open-book exams nowadays, and in an LLB, you usually get given an option to do a dissertation, but this varies on the university.

I think the best thing you can do to help you make an informed decision is, as suggested, gain work experience in a clinical area. Although I will be applying to study law next year, I actually did work experience in general surgery due to an interest in both health law and clinical psychology. You could opt for volunteering if gaining work experience proves to be a significant challenge. Gaining legal work experience is hard, but if you can find some, I would try and apply. Law firms, such as Clifford Chance have virtual work experience opportunities that anyone can complete (these take about 7 hours I believe). As well as work experience, you should also be attending subject talks at open days for different universities. Universities have started opening bookings for their open days, so I would suggest finding out the dates and trying to attend some - even for universities you don't necessarily want to attend.

I understand how hard it can be to make a decision on what to study, but you should know that both medicine and law are some of the hardest degrees in their fields (STEM and social sciences). Neither of which are easy to get into and careers are equally as competitive. I think the best thing that you can do is look more into a law degree and the modules offered, as well as looking at criminology degrees to see if that is better suited to you. Also, if you are interested in actually becoming a lawyer, to become a barrister, if you don't have an undergraduate degree in law, you can do a conversion degree, but to become a solicitor, under the new SQE route, you don't need a law degree at all. Alternatively, there is graduate entry medicine available for people who haven't studied STEM degrees.

If you have any more questions that I can help with let me know!
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by sg.0
im making my list of uni and I have noticed med has higher entry requirements than law (generally from what I've seen) my A-levels are two sciences and geography. im wondering whether I should look at taking law but idk whether ill like it or what. I've always been interested in like "problem solving", resolving issues and crimes so im wondering whether it's worth applying for law aswell as med but I dont want to do it then hate it. does anyone have any advice as to what I can do

Law isn’t all about crimes I think that’s a misconception. If your college offers, sit in on a sociology lesson and a law lesson to see what it’s like. This is because there is LOTS of writing and it’s very content heavy. You also need to be very committed to study this.

It’s also incredibly competitive for jobs, there’s not many high salary roles outside being a barrister or solicitor. There are much more graduates than there are available jobs, meaning even though entry requirements may be lower, unless you go to a top uni, it will be a struggle to land a good law related job.
I am a lawyer and my brother is a doctor.

To be a doctor, you need a vocation. Only you can know if you have the vocation for medicine.

To be a lawyer, you don't need either a vocation or a law degree, but you do need an analytical brain, an eye for detail, an appetite for very hard work, good written English, a large measure of self belief, mental and physical resilience, and good people skills.

I suggest that you study a subject which interests you in its own right, and which you are most likely to do well in. If that's law, fine. If not, you can study law after your degree.
Reply 11
You can be a lawyer without a law degree (unless you want to become a barrister), but you can't be a doctor without a medical degree. However, I can't imagine taking either of these two subjects unless you're passionate about or at least very interested in them (source: my dad is a doctor and I want to study law at uni). Law is a very competitive field to get a job in after you graduate, whereas medicine is a very long degree. So if you're undecided, consider picking another degree.
Point of detail: A law degree is not a requisite for becoming a barrister. A non law degree plus a Graduate Diploma in Law enables a person to take the Bar course.
Reply 13
Original post by Stiffy Byng
Point of detail: A law degree is not a requisite for becoming a barrister. A non law degree plus a Graduate Diploma in Law enables a person to take the Bar course.

Yes, sorry my mistake! I think the most recent stats from the bar council state that around half of those applying for pupillages have done the GDL.
Reply 14
Original post by Stiffy Byng
I am a lawyer and my brother is a doctor.
To be a doctor, you need a vocation. Only you can know if you have the vocation for medicine.
To be a lawyer, you don't need either a vocation or a law degree, but you do need an analytical brain, an eye for detail, an appetite for very hard work, good written English, a large measure of self belief, mental and physical resilience, and good people skills.
I suggest that you study a subject which interests you in its own right, and which you are most likely to do well in. If that's law, fine. If not, you can study law after your degree.

thank you that's really helpful
Reply 15
Original post by greentiger
Law isn’t all about crimes I think that’s a misconception. If your college offers, sit in on a sociology lesson and a law lesson to see what it’s like. This is because there is LOTS of writing and it’s very content heavy. You also need to be very committed to study this.
It’s also incredibly competitive for jobs, there’s not many high salary roles outside being a barrister or solicitor. There are much more graduates than there are available jobs, meaning even though entry requirements may be lower, unless you go to a top uni, it will be a struggle to land a good law related job.

thank you
Reply 16
Original post by bibachu
If you're interested in problem solving and resolving crimes and issues, it sounds that criminology may be more suited to you than law. Law is a very analytical subject and depending on the university you choose, you might not spend a lot of time dealing with criminal law. In a qualifying law degree, you'll have to go through lots of compulsory modules including criminal law, tort law, land law and public law. I would suggest looking into these modules, as well as the optional modules that different university courses offer. You could alternatively do a law and criminology degree, but again, you'll still have to cover the compulsory modules if it is a qualifying law degree.
If entry requirements are the only thing deterring you from medicine, look into foundation years. Law will also have high entry requirements (generally A*AA-AAB) and sometimes universities will require the LNAT (Law National Aptitude Test). While applying to medicine is a more tedious process, applying for law is not going to be much easier. Medicine and law are both very different courses to most degrees in terms of how they are taught. Medicine in first and second year is heavily focused on learning the theory needed for your clinical years. You'll have to do several placements in different areas while studying for exams. Law, to my knowledge, does not have many contact hours and instead you'll have to spend a lot more time than most students actually studying and reading the law in your own time. I think a lot of universities have opted for open-book exams nowadays, and in an LLB, you usually get given an option to do a dissertation, but this varies on the university.
I think the best thing you can do to help you make an informed decision is, as suggested, gain work experience in a clinical area. Although I will be applying to study law next year, I actually did work experience in general surgery due to an interest in both health law and clinical psychology. You could opt for volunteering if gaining work experience proves to be a significant challenge. Gaining legal work experience is hard, but if you can find some, I would try and apply. Law firms, such as Clifford Chance have virtual work experience opportunities that anyone can complete (these take about 7 hours I believe). As well as work experience, you should also be attending subject talks at open days for different universities. Universities have started opening bookings for their open days, so I would suggest finding out the dates and trying to attend some - even for universities you don't necessarily want to attend.
I understand how hard it can be to make a decision on what to study, but you should know that both medicine and law are some of the hardest degrees in their fields (STEM and social sciences). Neither of which are easy to get into and careers are equally as competitive. I think the best thing that you can do is look more into a law degree and the modules offered, as well as looking at criminology degrees to see if that is better suited to you. Also, if you are interested in actually becoming a lawyer, to become a barrister, if you don't have an undergraduate degree in law, you can do a conversion degree, but to become a solicitor, under the new SQE route, you don't need a law degree at all. Alternatively, there is graduate entry medicine available for people who haven't studied STEM degrees.
If you have any more questions that I can help with let me know!

thank you that's helpful. I think I'll have to look at a foundation year for med. I want to do medicine but if I can't im not sure what else there is and (I know it's shallow but) I want a degree that will help me get a well paid job.

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