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does not taking further maths disadvantage me for physics degree?

Referring to unis like Glasgow, kings , Aberdeen and Lancaster where I’d like to apply. It’s not a requirement anywhere but I wondered if this would hinder my chances?

EDIT: thanks for your replies everyone, really helpful and reassuring. While I wish I had taken further maths purely for my own satisfaction, i may just study some topics myself that are important in physics undergrad and mention this in the PS to ensure unis know that the reason I didn’t take FM was just luck, not a lack of dedication to maths lol.
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 1
I doubt it will hinder your chance of offers if that is what you are concerned about.
Original post by Nat4695
Referring to unis like Glasgow, kings , Aberdeen and Lancaster where I’d like to apply. It’s not a requirement anywhere but I wondered if this would hinder my chances?


If it was a requirement then they would say so. If its not a requirement then you are fine to not do it.
Reply 3
You can usually find on the uni page which subjects are required or recommended. e.g., studying maths at many unis I applied to required maths + fm if available. I remember reading some other course reqs for CS said fm was recommended. If they don’t mention either, then it’s up to you to take it or not..

IMO, taking fm cus is useful since it can help prep you for the more maths-heavy parts of your degree. Since it’s gonna have a lot of maths, might as well do some more for your a-levels ahaha
Original post by Nat4695
Referring to unis like Glasgow, kings , Aberdeen and Lancaster where I’d like to apply. It’s not a requirement anywhere but I wondered if this would hinder my chances?

it depends - does your school offer further maths?
Reply 5
Original post by metalbox
You can usually find on the uni page which subjects are required or recommended. e.g., studying maths at many unis I applied to required maths + fm if available. I remember reading some other course reqs for CS said fm was recommended. If they don’t mention either, then it’s up to you to take it or not..
IMO, taking fm cus is useful since it can help prep you for the more maths-heavy parts of your degree. Since it’s gonna have a lot of maths, might as well do some more for your a-levels ahaha

I’m in y12 so can’t take fm now
Reply 6
Original post by A Rolling Stone
it depends - does your school offer further maths?

yes. I was going to pick it but was initially intimidated as I used to think I wasn’t a maths person and the fm classes would consist of geniuses. Well it turns out I am a maths person just was being taught by the wrong teachers because now it’s my favourite subject unfortunately too late to change.
Reply 7
Original post by Nat4695
I’m in y12 so can’t take fm now


Ah that’s unfortunate 😶
Unlikely to really be an issue for admissions outside of Oxbridge/Imperial and maybe a couple other similar courses.

Of course it's very useful to have, and you'll cover that material in the degree eventually anyway. So if you get the opportunity even taking the AS level in FM would be helpful for your own sake (not in terms of admissions) :smile:
Reply 9
Original post by Nat4695
Referring to unis like Glasgow, kings , Aberdeen and Lancaster where I’d like to apply. It’s not a requirement anywhere but I wondered if this would hinder my chances?

Daughter is in 4th year at Lancaster (she did fm alevel). Her first year also had students in her year that did not do the futher maths alevel. The ones that did the FM find the first year much easier as a lot of the first year was a 'recap' of some alevel like vectors etc. The ones that did not do FM alevel had that first year to catch up with the others that did. So its not a problem as you are going to learn it anyway, but you might not do things like network flow and such.
Reply 10
thanks guys that was helpful
maybe i should just teach myself some of the topics to prep for year 1 after i do my exams or have a look at some topics sooner and mention this in my personal statement?
Reply 11
As a thought - I wonder if you are concerned about not having further maths whether Scottish universities might be a great option as they do an extra year and Scottish high schools tend to cover more subjects?
Reply 12
Original post by ajj2000
As a thought - I wonder if you are concerned about not having further maths whether Scottish universities might be a great option as they do an extra year and Scottish high schools tend to cover more subjects?
yes im already considering scottish unis esp glasgow and edinburgh and aberdeen maybe but for other reasons. But if scottish schools cover more subjects wouldnt more scottish students likely have an equivalent of further??
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by Nat4695
Referring to unis like Glasgow, kings , Aberdeen and Lancaster where I’d like to apply. It’s not a requirement anywhere but I wondered if this would hinder my chances?

Hi,
Further maths definitely isn't a requirement for studying physics at Lancaster. In my experience maybe 1/3 of physics students have studied further maths or equivalent. I personally did study further maths, but this only gives you a slight advantage during first year as you are more familiar with topics such as complex numbers, vectors and matrices. At Lancaster, first year doesn't count towards your final degree classification and is more of a chance for everyone to reach the same baseline of knowledge and understanding to build on in later years. A lot of my friends didn't study further maths but by the end of first year, we were all at the same level.
Hope this helps,
Becky (Lancaster University student ambassador)
Reply 14
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hi,
Further maths definitely isn't a requirement for studying physics at Lancaster. In my experience maybe 1/3 of physics students have studied further maths or equivalent. I personally did study further maths, but this only gives you a slight advantage during first year as you are more familiar with topics such as complex numbers, vectors and matrices. At Lancaster, first year doesn't count towards your final degree classification and is more of a chance for everyone to reach the same baseline of knowledge and understanding to build on in later years. A lot of my friends didn't study further maths but by the end of first year, we were all at the same level.
Hope this helps,
Becky (Lancaster University student ambassador)

Thank you that was rlly helpful as I’m considering applying to Lancaster :smile:)
Original post by Nat4695
Referring to unis like Glasgow, kings , Aberdeen and Lancaster where I’d like to apply. It’s not a requirement anywhere but I wondered if this would hinder my chances?

Hi @Nat4695,
As you've said its not an entry requirement to study A Level further maths for Lancaster's physics degree, therefore it is unlikely to hinder your chances. In the 1st year of your degree you will get taught the core skills required for the rest of your degree which may include some more advanced maths, however everyone on the course will be taught this to make sure everyone is at the same starting point.
Hope this helps!
-Jasmine (Lancaster Student Ambassador)

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