The Student Room Group

I’m not sure what to do at uni

Hi,

This might be a long post because I am so lost on what to do right now and the application process is right around the corner for me (i’m year 12). Please can you read through this, it is a really easy read, I promise.

I was set on doing Nursing since the start of year 11, I passed all of my GCSE’s (grades ranging from 4-6) and decided to do BTEC Level 3 National Diploma qualification in Applied Science alongside A-Level Sociology. I had my heart set on Nursing as I have had countless experiences with people in the profession. This is why I chose to do a BTEC, I know that nursing courses don’t really push away from anyone with the qualification. In addition to that, I liked the idea of having little exams so I can focus on my course work.

However, when I joint the course I feel in love with biology, learning about the science behind vaccinations, and viral infections, ect. When writing my assignments I would love researching all about the science of why things happen, how they happen and how they are treated.

So, because I have found myself in love with biology and how things are treated and how they happen I was looking at courses in universities that are biology based, such as Applied Medical Science. However, I still want to work in a healthcare setting, I don’t want to be behind the scenes, I want to be treating patients and investigating why they are having the symptoms they are experiencing. So, I looked at Medicine courses, which was quickly shut down due to the entry requirements for almost ALL of the universities I looked at. Nor one would accept either my low GCSE grades or my BTEC Applied Science. So, I looked at graduate entry medicine, but I found that some courses “lie” about accepting some science courses onto their programs. I don’t want to do a degree which will lead me to no clinical practice in the future since that I what I would like to do.

So now I don’t know what I want to do. I’m not sure if I want to do nursing since I think I have just fell in love with the science side of everything and the treatment, and diagnostic process. But I don’t qualify unless I do a GEM course.

What course would be best for me to do? Given my situation, what do you think I should do?

Thank you for reading all the way through (if you didnt, I dont blame you, its quite long),

Poster. :smile:
Have you thought about occupational therapy?
Original post by Andriana76
Have you thought about occupational therapy?


Yes, I had a brief look at becoming one but it’s not something that I think I would love to do.
Have a look at some of the other AHP roles, such as therapeutic or diagnostic radiography. Once qualified and with experience under your belt, there are opportunities to specialise and, with hard work and determination, you can progress to consultant radiographer.

I'd recommend that you start attending some uni open days and go to the subject talks for a range of healthcare courses, and then talk to staff and students about the employment opportunities.

https://www.england.nhs.uk/ahp/role/
Original post by normaw
Have a look at some of the other AHP roles, such as therapeutic or diagnostic radiography. Once qualified and with experience under your belt, there are opportunities to specialise and, with hard work and determination, you can progress to consultant radiographer.
I'd recommend that you start attending some uni open days and go to the subject talks for a range of healthcare courses, and then talk to staff and students about the employment opportunities.
https://www.england.nhs.uk/ahp/role/


Okay, thank you for the help. :smile:
Reply 5
have you considered being a physician associate? I'm not entirely sure about entry requirements but it's a similar course.
alternatively, continue with nursing as nurses can have quite a large role in treatment and diagnostics as they get more senior.
you could think about taking a couple of gap years to study A levels if you really want to pursue medicine but if academic study and exams aren't really your thing then I'm not sure how well you'd survive a medicine course as it's very academic and the exams are very high pressure.
Original post by AliceKS
have you considered being a physician associate? I'm not entirely sure about entry requirements but it's a similar course.
alternatively, continue with nursing as nurses can have quite a large role in treatment and diagnostics as they get more senior.
you could think about taking a couple of gap years to study A levels if you really want to pursue medicine but if academic study and exams aren't really your thing then I'm not sure how well you'd survive a medicine course as it's very academic and the exams are very high pressure.


I have looked into being a physician associate, still looking now actually. I actually really like exams but I was more invested in the course work side and the physics, biology and chemistry units that applied science offered.
Consider Healthcare Science, public health and environmental health professions.
These are not often discussed because they are such small staff groups.

You would work in the NHS, local council or public health laboratories.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk
P.S. If interested in Healthcare Science degrees, you must find an NHS approved course (some are not approved & you won’t be able to find a job afterwards). These are IBMS accredited. The best is IBMS accredited with an integrated placement.
Look at the link I posted, ask your careers advisor, see link below.

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/healthcare-science/how-become-healthcare-science-professional

You could even contact your local big NHS hospital and ask for the professional Biomedical Science Professional Lead, who may be able to help you.
diagnostic radiography seems like a good choice!
If you want to combine scientific testing with direct patient contact,l maybe clinical Physiology? (sometimes called "healthcare science" degrees). You can specialise in cardiac (ECG, Echocardiography, etc.), Neuro (EMG, nerve conductance studies, etc.), or respiratory (Lung function, histamine challenge testing, etc ). The link posted by Antique1 above will also have info on these careers
Original post by Antique1
P.S. If interested in Healthcare Science degrees, you must find an NHS approved course (some are not approved & you won’t be able to find a job afterwards). These are IBMS accredited. The best is IBMS accredited with an integrated placement.
Look at the link I posted, ask your careers advisor, see link below.
https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/explore-roles/healthcare-science/how-become-healthcare-science-professional
You could even contact your local big NHS hospital and ask for the professional Biomedical Science Professional Lead, who may be able to help you.


Thank you so much for your help, I will have a look at the doe courses now. :smile:
Original post by mackers_ire
If you want to combine scientific testing with direct patient contact,l maybe clinical Physiology? (sometimes called "healthcare science" degrees). You can specialise in cardiac (ECG, Echocardiography, etc.), Neuro (EMG, nerve conductance studies, etc.), or respiratory (Lung function, histamine challenge testing, etc ). The link posted by Antique1 above will also have info on these careers


I will have a look at these now too, thank you for your help. It is really appreciated. :smile:
Original post by kkskekejj
diagnostic radiography seems like a good choice!


I wouldn’t have thought of this. I’ll take a look now. Thank you for the suggestion! :smile:
Reply 14
Original post by notkierantho
Hi,
This might be a long post because I am so lost on what to do right now and the application process is right around the corner for me (i’m year 12). Please can you read through this, it is a really easy read, I promise.
I was set on doing Nursing since the start of year 11, I passed all of my GCSE’s (grades ranging from 4-6) and decided to do BTEC Level 3 National Diploma qualification in Applied Science alongside A-Level Sociology. I had my heart set on Nursing as I have had countless experiences with people in the profession. This is why I chose to do a BTEC, I know that nursing courses don’t really push away from anyone with the qualification. In addition to that, I liked the idea of having little exams so I can focus on my course work.
However, when I joint the course I feel in love with biology, learning about the science behind vaccinations, and viral infections, ect. When writing my assignments I would love researching all about the science of why things happen, how they happen and how they are treated.
So, because I have found myself in love with biology and how things are treated and how they happen I was looking at courses in universities that are biology based, such as Applied Medical Science. However, I still want to work in a healthcare setting, I don’t want to be behind the scenes, I want to be treating patients and investigating why they are having the symptoms they are experiencing. So, I looked at Medicine courses, which was quickly shut down due to the entry requirements for almost ALL of the universities I looked at. Nor one would accept either my low GCSE grades or my BTEC Applied Science. So, I looked at graduate entry medicine, but I found that some courses “lie” about accepting some science courses onto their programs. I don’t want to do a degree which will lead me to no clinical practice in the future since that I what I would like to do.
So now I don’t know what I want to do. I’m not sure if I want to do nursing since I think I have just fell in love with the science side of everything and the treatment, and diagnostic process. But I don’t qualify unless I do a GEM course.
What course would be best for me to do? Given my situation, what do you think I should do?
Thank you for reading all the way through (if you didnt, I dont blame you, its quite long),
Poster. :smile:

Hi,

You could look into becoming a clinical scientist so you could do biomedical science or biochemistry, with this you would advise doctors etc. Or maybe you could look into optometry? It is patient based and some universities allow applied science.
You could do paramedic science, diagnostic radiography, operating department practitioner. There’s plenty of underrated Allied Health Professional roles u can look into.

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