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Chemistry question organic

Hi, please could i have help on this question?
Here is the question: https://app.gemoo.com/share/image-annotation/635976106685288448?codeId=DWlgwryGy7eq6&origin=imageurlgenerator

Thank you!
Reply 1
Original post by anonymous294
Hi, please could i have help on this question?
Here is the question: https://app.gemoo.com/share/image-annotation/635976106685288448?codeId=DWlgwryGy7eq6&origin=imageurlgenerator
Thank you!

What are your thoughts?
Original post by Pigster
What are your thoughts?

I know the double bond has to break into single bonds but I’m not sure how to determine where the position of the branching is?
Reply 3
Original post by anonymous294
I know the double bond has to break into single bonds but I’m not sure how to determine where the position of the branching is?

Do you lay out every alkene addition polymer equation the same way?

i.e. with the C=C horizontally with the four attached groups above and below their respective C atoms? And then show the polymer with the same arrangement of atoms?

Like this (scrowl down to first image): https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.savemyexams.com%2Figcse%2Fchemistry%2Fcie%2F23%2Frevision-notes%2F11-organic-chemistry%2F11-3-polymers%2F11-3-2-addition--condensation-polymers%2F&psig=AOvVaw32Sb8W-5hx_Y09x0UqMew9&ust=1712681563859000&source=images&cd=vfe&opi=89978449&ved=0CBIQjRxqFwoTCNj5kJeKs4UDFQAAAAAdAAAAABAE

Can you do the same for cyclohexene? It might help to number the carbons on the rings.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by Pigster
Do you lay out every alkene addition polymer equation the same way?
i.e. with the C=C horizontally with the four attached groups above and below their respective C atoms? And then show the polymer with the same arrangement of atoms?
Like this: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.savemyexams.com%2Figcse%2Fchemistry%2Fcie%2F23%2Frevision-notes%2F11-organic-chemistry%2F11-3-polymers%2F11-3-2-addition--condensation-polymers%2F&psig=AOvVaw32Sb8W-5hx_Y09x0UqMew9&ust=1712681563859000&source=images&cd=vfe&opi=89978449&ved=0CBIQjRxqFwoTCNj5kJeKs4UDFQAAAAAdAAAAABAE
Can you do the same for cyclohexene?

But im not sure how the double bond would break here? Normally if it was ethane or propene etc, it would be arranged as you said with the atoms above and below c-c but i dont know how to do this for the cycloalkane?
Reply 5
Original post by anonymous294
But im not sure how the double bond would break here? Normally if it was ethane or propene etc, it would be arranged as you said with the atoms above and below c-c but i dont know how to do this for the cycloalkane?

Have the loop of 4x CH2's
Is it C?
Original post by WordsFiddle
Is it C?

Yes
Original post by anonymous294
Yes

I guess the easy way to look at it is that when polymerisation occurs, the double bond breaks so that two carbon atoms have unpaired electrons. These two carbon atoms will always be side by side (as they share the double bond) so the branches will also be side by side. This is only the case is part C.
Original post by WordsFiddle
I guess the easy way to look at it is that when polymerisation occurs, the double bond breaks so that two carbon atoms have unpaired electrons. These two carbon atoms will always be side by side (as they share the double bond) so the branches will also be side by side. This is only the case is part C.

Ahhh that makes sense, thank you:smile:

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