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Bristol Law

I'm currently in Year 12 studying psychology, philosophy and politics and will be applying to study law (LLB) in September for 2025. My current confirmed choices are Manchester, Leeds, York and Birmingham and originally, I had intended on applying to another non-LNAT university for my fifth option (either Nottingham or Sheffield). I had previously not felt confident in my ability to apply to an LNAT university, as I know that they consider GCSEs more and my GCSEs were impacted heavily due to severe health issues and bereavement (extenuating circumstances). I was not sure about gaining good predicted grades for my end of year mocks, which will determine my predicted grades on UCAS, but I am now revising and feeling more confident in my ability. I've also written half of my personal statement (I know it's very early) and I'm currently in the application process for multiple schemes at law firms. Overall, I've regained my confidence and after completing some more LNAT practice questions today, I am finally understanding how I should answer questions and figuring out the best techniques to approach the test. On my first full practice test, I scored 23, which is around the national average. I couldn't find much information in regards to what scores Bristol is looking for in recent years, but I'm assuming it's in the 25-30 range. I feel like if I put in the work, I can definitely score higher than 30 on the LNAT and I have found lots of resources to help me revise. Originally, I was only going to take the LNAT to apply to KCL and UCL, but I no longer want to stay in London for university. I'm now considering Cambridge or Bristol as my final choices, if I take the LNAT.

I have a few questions about both the University of Bristol and the law faculty that I'd be grateful if any students or offer holders could answer:

1. Is it still true that Bristol as a university is not very diverse socio-economically amongst it's undergraduate student body? If so, as a BAME student, what can I do to make my experience there one where I don't feel isolated?
2. How do you find the law course at Bristol in terms of modules, assessment styles and exams? Is the teaching good?
3. I know law is obviously a very competitive field, but would you say that students are competitive or unwilling to help others on the course?
4. How have you, or how are you, finding applying to graduate opportunities such as training contracts, vacation schemes and first year schemes? Do you find that the University of Bristol is preparing you well for the intensity of these processes?
5. I'm not the biggest on partying. I don't mind going out but I'm not into recreational substances or huge on drinking due to personal preference. Bristol, having a reputation as a party city, is filled with people who are into these type of activities, but is there a good network of people who aren't?
6. If you know anything about the ACS events at Bristol, are they held quite frequently and are they enjoyable?
7. I've heard things about accommodation shortages at the University of Bristol. As a student with health issues, would this be taken into account when applying for accommodation and is there still a big risk that I may not end up with suitable accommodation, or is there a special process that I can go through?

Again, I'd be grateful to anyone who could provide me with some insight. I'm deciding on where I should go for open days this summer and I've already booked Birmingham and will be booking York. My last option is going to be between Cambridge, Nottingham and Sheffield (maybe Bristol if they put out more dates, since I cannot attend the next ones), so this will be a factor in my decision. In case anyone is wondering, my GCSEs are 876554 with an 8 in English language and a 5 in maths, which I resat and got the same grade (higher). I'm working at grades A*-B in my A levels and I'm hoping to gain all A/A*s in my mocks. I'll also be doing an EPQ next year about counter-terrorism law and I'm hoping to gain an A/A* in this too.
(edited 2 months ago)
Reply 1
Original post by bibachu
I'm deciding on where I should go for open days this summer and I've already booked Birmingham and will be booking York. My last option is going to be between Cambridge, Nottingham and Sheffield (maybe Bristol if they put out more dates, since I cannot attend the next ones), so this will be a factor in my decision.


If you can't make the open days, then there are other opportunities to visit the campus. The university offers campus tours from October to April, or you could do a self-guided tour. See https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/visits/ for more details.
(edited 2 months ago)
Inside University of Bristol
University of Bristol
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Reply 2
Original post by martin7
If you can't make the open days, then there are other opportunities to visit the campus. The university offers campus tours from October to April, or you could do a self-guided tour. See https://www.bristol.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/visits/ for more details.

Thank you so much! Would this include getting subject talks and viewing accommodation or is this only available at open days?
Original post by bibachu
I'm currently in Year 12 studying psychology, philosophy and politics and will be applying to study law (LLB) in September for 2025. My current confirmed choices are Manchester, Leeds, York and Birmingham and originally, I had intended on applying to another non-LNAT university for my fifth option (either Nottingham or Sheffield). I had previously not felt confident in my ability to apply to an LNAT university, as I know that they consider GCSEs more and my GCSEs were impacted heavily due to severe health issues and bereavement (extenuating circumstances). I was not sure about gaining good predicted grades for my end of year mocks, which will determine my predicted grades on UCAS, but I am now revising and feeling more confident in my ability. I've also written half of my personal statement (I know it's very early) and I'm currently in the application process for multiple schemes at law firms. Overall, I've regained my confidence and after completing some more LNAT practice questions today, I am finally understanding how I should answer questions and figuring out the best techniques to approach the test. On my first full practice test, I scored 23, which is around the national average. I couldn't find much information in regards to what scores Bristol is looking for in recent years, but I'm assuming it's in the 25-30 range. I feel like if I put in the work, I can definitely score higher than 30 on the LNAT and I have found lots of resources to help me revise. Originally, I was only going to take the LNAT to apply to KCL and UCL, but I no longer want to stay in London for university. I'm now considering Cambridge or Bristol as my final choices, if I take the LNAT.
I have a few questions about both the University of Bristol and the law faculty that I'd be grateful if any students or offer holders could answer:
1. Is it still true that Bristol as a university is not very diverse socio-economically amongst it's undergraduate student body? If so, as a BAME student, what can I do to make my experience there one where I don't feel isolated?
2. How do you find the law course at Bristol in terms of modules, assessment styles and exams? Is the teaching good?
3. I know law is obviously a very competitive field, but would you say that students are competitive or unwilling to help others on the course?
4. How have you, or how are you, finding applying to graduate opportunities such as training contracts, vacation schemes and first year schemes? Do you find that the University of Bristol is preparing you well for the intensity of these processes?
5. I'm not the biggest on partying. I don't mind going out but I'm not into recreational substances or huge on drinking due to personal preference. Bristol, having a reputation as a party city, is filled with people who are into these type of activities, but is there a good network of people who aren't?
6. If you know anything about the ACS events at Bristol, are they held quite frequently and are they enjoyable?
7. I've heard things about accommodation shortages at the University of Bristol. As a student with health issues, would this be taken into account when applying for accommodation and is there still a big risk that I may not end up with suitable accommodation, or is there a special process that I can go through?
Again, I'd be grateful to anyone who could provide me with some insight. I'm deciding on where I should go for open days this summer and I've already booked Birmingham and will be booking York. My last option is going to be between Cambridge, Nottingham and Sheffield (maybe Bristol if they put out more dates, since I cannot attend the next ones), so this will be a factor in my decision. In case anyone is wondering, my GCSEs are 876554 with an 8 in English language and a 5 in maths, which I resat and got the same grade (higher). I'm working at grades A*-B in my A levels and I'm hoping to gain all A/A*s in my mocks. I'll also be doing an EPQ next year about counter-terrorism law and I'm hoping to gain an A/A* in this too.

For context, I'm 1st year law at Bristol; I got an offer with these stats:

A* A* A (predicted, A*AB achieved, contextual offer of AAB)
999888777
24 LNAT

I also got an interview from Oxford, i think largely due to socio-economic factors and my personal statement. For your questions:

1.

In my experience the course cohort may not be the most socio-economically diverse, however I have found (as someone who falls into all of the lowest socio-economic brackets) that this was never an issue when meeting people and building relationships. Attending societies that you are interested in (for me this was debating) means you get to link with people that are interested in more than just the course you're studying, and are more likely to break through any such barriers this way.

2.

You will have low contact hours (not many lectures, 5 seminars per fortnight) but the reading is never too draining provided you tackle it in good time instead of procrastinating it (from experience of lots of procrastination). The Law and State module has a somewhat strange assessment as its not the typical law essay but ultimately its not very difficult to adjust to. On assessments, you typically get a week to right two 1500 word essays, open book and online submission.

3.

Bristol somewhat eliminates competition technically by having no limit on the amount of 1st-class marks offered; everyone could get a first, but not everyone does. I am a very competitive person so I do look at my cohort as competition, but on the flip-side I actively help my friends out with questions and vice versa.

4.

I know people that have applied to 15-20 first year schemes and gotten a couple, others apply to 5-6 and get all of them. Bristol has significant support networks for application advice and graduate opportunities, from the University of Bristol Law Club (UBLC), to specific SU and university careers advice. I haven't got that much experience with applications as (1) first year applications are quite taxing but dont make or break your legal career; I know third years without TC's who got multiple first year schemes, and others with the opposite, and (2) I am under a bursary with a US firm that grants me work experience placements without the need for applications (it is specifically for students from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds, and there are many like it. If you are interested, look for Sidley Austin's Undergraduate Bursary Programme, or Allen & Overy's, Bird & Bird's etc.).

5.

I am exactly the same; the most I will do is a pint at the pub after debating, and (in my group) there is no expectation to drink or partake in anything you don't want to. As much as it has the party culture, Bristol is still ultimately (for the most part) filled with rational people that won't actively peer pressure you into partying, drinking etc. You will find your crowd, whether through your course or a society.

6.

I'm not a part of ACS however there are many newsletters that advertises such events, and it seems to be quite a big society so I'm sure events are frequent.

7.

Again, I had similar considerations when applying for halls, but the university did a great job of accommodating my needs by granting me the specific kind of accommodation I needed; there are sections on the accommodation application that allow you to inform the university of any requirements you may have (with reasoning) which increases your odds of getting the halls you need.


On open days, attend them all, or none! The only open day I went to was Oxford's, so Bristol was completely unfamiliar, but I settled in quite quickly. Additionally, I'm going to go out on a limb and say you have applied for CMS Connect (as I also did Y12 experience); they offer this in the Bristol branch which allows you to take a look at some nice parts of Bristol which aren't far from the university if you choose to venture out.

Best of luck!
Reply 4
Original post by bjones02520
For context, I'm 1st year law at Bristol; I got an offer with these stats:
A* A* A (predicted, A*AB achieved, contextual offer of AAB)
999888777
24 LNAT
I also got an interview from Oxford, i think largely due to socio-economic factors and my personal statement. For your questions:

1.

In my experience the course cohort may not be the most socio-economically diverse, however I have found (as someone who falls into all of the lowest socio-economic brackets) that this was never an issue when meeting people and building relationships. Attending societies that you are interested in (for me this was debating) means you get to link with people that are interested in more than just the course you're studying, and are more likely to break through any such barriers this way.

2.

You will have low contact hours (not many lectures, 5 seminars per fortnight) but the reading is never too draining provided you tackle it in good time instead of procrastinating it (from experience of lots of procrastination). The Law and State module has a somewhat strange assessment as its not the typical law essay but ultimately its not very difficult to adjust to. On assessments, you typically get a week to right two 1500 word essays, open book and online submission.

3.

Bristol somewhat eliminates competition technically by having no limit on the amount of 1st-class marks offered; everyone could get a first, but not everyone does. I am a very competitive person so I do look at my cohort as competition, but on the flip-side I actively help my friends out with questions and vice versa.

4.

I know people that have applied to 15-20 first year schemes and gotten a couple, others apply to 5-6 and get all of them. Bristol has significant support networks for application advice and graduate opportunities, from the University of Bristol Law Club (UBLC), to specific SU and university careers advice. I haven't got that much experience with applications as (1) first year applications are quite taxing but dont make or break your legal career; I know third years without TC's who got multiple first year schemes, and others with the opposite, and (2) I am under a bursary with a US firm that grants me work experience placements without the need for applications (it is specifically for students from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds, and there are many like it. If you are interested, look for Sidley Austin's Undergraduate Bursary Programme, or Allen & Overy's, Bird & Bird's etc.).

5.

I am exactly the same; the most I will do is a pint at the pub after debating, and (in my group) there is no expectation to drink or partake in anything you don't want to. As much as it has the party culture, Bristol is still ultimately (for the most part) filled with rational people that won't actively peer pressure you into partying, drinking etc. You will find your crowd, whether through your course or a society.

6.

I'm not a part of ACS however there are many newsletters that advertises such events, and it seems to be quite a big society so I'm sure events are frequent.

7.

Again, I had similar considerations when applying for halls, but the university did a great job of accommodating my needs by granting me the specific kind of accommodation I needed; there are sections on the accommodation application that allow you to inform the university of any requirements you may have (with reasoning) which increases your odds of getting the halls you need.


On open days, attend them all, or none! The only open day I went to was Oxford's, so Bristol was completely unfamiliar, but I settled in quite quickly. Additionally, I'm going to go out on a limb and say you have applied for CMS Connect (as I also did Y12 experience); they offer this in the Bristol branch which allows you to take a look at some nice parts of Bristol which aren't far from the university if you choose to venture out.
Best of luck!

Thank you so much for the insight, I really appreciate how thorough you’ve been with answering my questions! I didn’t apply to CMS Connect but I am in the application process for a 5 year scholarship at a silver circle firm (I have my interview in a few days) and have started applications for firms who partner with PRIME Commitment to gain summer work experience in law. I have looked over my four options again (Cambridge, Bristol, Nottingham and Sheffield) and have decided that either Bristol or Nottingham will be my final choice. I’m really glad to know that they support students well with accommodation after hearing all these recent horror stories, as this was one of my main concerns. Similarly, if I am selected for this scholarship at the silver circle firm, I will be given internship opportunities on a yearly basis, so I won’t have to worry about first year opportunities too much - but that’s only if I get in! I’m hoping to get an LNAT score of anywhere between 29-32 since my GCSEs are slightly weaker. I’ll try to attend an open day at Bristol as it sounds like a better fit for me than I initially thought. Thank you again for answering my questions and addressing my concerns! :smile:
Reply 5
Original post by bibachu
Thank you so much! Would this include getting subject talks and viewing accommodation or is this only available at open days?

The page about campus tours includes this:

Our tours offer you an overview of the University campus. The tours are not subject-specific, so you won't be able to visit academic departments or meet with admissions tutors.

Please note the route does not include a tour of any accommodation.


Subject talks and accommodation visits are features of open days.
Original post by bibachu
I'm currently in Year 12 studying psychology, philosophy and politics and will be applying to study law (LLB) in September for 2025. My current confirmed choices are Manchester, Leeds, York and Birmingham and originally, I had intended on applying to another non-LNAT university for my fifth option (either Nottingham or Sheffield). I had previously not felt confident in my ability to apply to an LNAT university, as I know that they consider GCSEs more and my GCSEs were impacted heavily due to severe health issues and bereavement (extenuating circumstances). I was not sure about gaining good predicted grades for my end of year mocks, which will determine my predicted grades on UCAS, but I am now revising and feeling more confident in my ability. I've also written half of my personal statement (I know it's very early) and I'm currently in the application process for multiple schemes at law firms. Overall, I've regained my confidence and after completing some more LNAT practice questions today, I am finally understanding how I should answer questions and figuring out the best techniques to approach the test. On my first full practice test, I scored 23, which is around the national average. I couldn't find much information in regards to what scores Bristol is looking for in recent years, but I'm assuming it's in the 25-30 range. I feel like if I put in the work, I can definitely score higher than 30 on the LNAT and I have found lots of resources to help me revise. Originally, I was only going to take the LNAT to apply to KCL and UCL, but I no longer want to stay in London for university. I'm now considering Cambridge or Bristol as my final choices, if I take the LNAT.
I have a few questions about both the University of Bristol and the law faculty that I'd be grateful if any students or offer holders could answer:
1. Is it still true that Bristol as a university is not very diverse socio-economically amongst it's undergraduate student body? If so, as a BAME student, what can I do to make my experience there one where I don't feel isolated?
2. How do you find the law course at Bristol in terms of modules, assessment styles and exams? Is the teaching good?
3. I know law is obviously a very competitive field, but would you say that students are competitive or unwilling to help others on the course?
4. How have you, or how are you, finding applying to graduate opportunities such as training contracts, vacation schemes and first year schemes? Do you find that the University of Bristol is preparing you well for the intensity of these processes?
5. I'm not the biggest on partying. I don't mind going out but I'm not into recreational substances or huge on drinking due to personal preference. Bristol, having a reputation as a party city, is filled with people who are into these type of activities, but is there a good network of people who aren't?
6. If you know anything about the ACS events at Bristol, are they held quite frequently and are they enjoyable?
7. I've heard things about accommodation shortages at the University of Bristol. As a student with health issues, would this be taken into account when applying for accommodation and is there still a big risk that I may not end up with suitable accommodation, or is there a special process that I can go through?
Again, I'd be grateful to anyone who could provide me with some insight. I'm deciding on where I should go for open days this summer and I've already booked Birmingham and will be booking York. My last option is going to be between Cambridge, Nottingham and Sheffield (maybe Bristol if they put out more dates, since I cannot attend the next ones), so this will be a factor in my decision. In case anyone is wondering, my GCSEs are 876554 with an 8 in English language and a 5 in maths, which I resat and got the same grade (higher). I'm working at grades A*-B in my A levels and I'm hoping to gain all A/A*s in my mocks. I'll also be doing an EPQ next year about counter-terrorism law and I'm hoping to gain an A/A* in this too.

Hi - I am not at Bristol yet but recently firmed my offer there. Definitely don't let your GCSE;s put you off from applying to top universities! I only took 5 GCSE’s due to extreme extenuating circumstances and both Cambridge and Bristol were excellent in communicating this - I ended up getting an interview at Cambridge and a lowered offer from Bristol (AAB)
(Currently predicted A*AA and scored 32 on the LNAT)

Of course I’m not there yet so i cant comment on the lifestyle etc but I have just applied for accommodation and there are sections to add any additional needs for disability etc which was super clear on the application form, so I wouldn’t let that put you off either

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