The Student Room Group

Question About Academics For Leading City Firms

Hi all,

I graduated a couple of years back and have been working in recruitment. I'm looking to move into law and apply to Vac Schemes and TCs from this autumn.

My question concerns my academics. I graduated with a first class degree from an RG uni in a non-law subject. In my first year I averaged 57.5, mainly because I received two '40' marks due to technical issues in uploading. I do partially blame myself since I should have tried to upload the work sooner. There was nothing I could do about this at the time.

The rest of my degree is somewhat spotty but mostly 2:1 and 1st modules (whole degree ended with an average of 68).

Will top city law firms be particularly fussed at the modules given the end result and the fact that it is a non-law degree?

Thanks.
About half of the practising lawyers in the UK have non-law degrees. With a first in a rigorous academic subject, and a GDL, you can be a competitive candidate for a training contract at a commercial law firm. RG degrees are well regarded by law firms, but note that many firms now assess candidates university-blind.

I have done a lot of recruitment of pupil barristers, and also of associates for law firms (I spent a few years as a partner in an offshore law firm). I have never enquired about how a candidate performed in individual papers within his or her degree.

By the way, I thought that a candidate had to score 70/100 or more overall to be awarded a first at most universities, but maybe different universities have different grade boundaries. Maybe it's done by counting the results in individual modules at some universities.

SB (a lawyer with a non-law degree)
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 2
Original post by Stiffy Byng
About half of the practising lawyers in the UK have non-law degrees. With a first in a rigorous academic subject, and a GDL, you can be a competitive candidate for a training contract at a commercial law firm. RG degrees are well regarded by law firms, but note that many firms now assess candidates university-blind.
I have done a lot of recruitment of pupil barristers, and also of associates for law firms (I spent a few years as a partner in an offshore law firm). I have never enquired about how a candidate performed in individual papers within his or her degree.
By the way, I thought that a candidate had to score 70/100 or more overall to be awarded a first at most universities, but maybe different universities have different grade boundaries. Maybe it's done by counting the results in individual modules at some universities.
SB (a lawyer with a non-law degree)

I studied English if that helps. They lowered the standards due to COVID so it was 68 instead of 70. I basically scraped a first. Very good info and I'm more hopeful so thanks for your message!
Also have a look at linkedin profiles searching trainee solicitor and then the name of a big firm where you would like to work to see what those people have for academics. Most big firms will ask for the marks in every module in each year of your degree.

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