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English Marking

Is there any free websites to mark English Literature and Language essays? My teachers are terrible at marking so im tryna find a reliable source. I remember seeing someone send a link to some AI but i cant remember the name - would AI help?
Reply 1
Original post by Rc-14
Is there any free websites to mark English Literature and Language essays? My teachers are terrible at marking so im tryna find a reliable source. I remember seeing someone send a link to some AI but i cant remember the name - would AI help?

Heyy, you can use tilf.com to mark you english essays. You can use it for your other subjects too but im pretty sure you you have to pay for the others apart from english lit and im not sure about language. Hope this helps :smile:)
Original post by Rc-14
Is there any free websites to mark English Literature and Language essays? My teachers are terrible at marking so im tryna find a reliable source. I remember seeing someone send a link to some AI but i cant remember the name - would AI help?

Hey, I got a grade 9 in gcse english language and a grade 9 in gcse english literature. (AQA) I am currently doing eng lang a level aqa so I have a good understanding of the markscheme. You can send me any essays and I'll be happy to mark :smile:
Reply 3
Original post by badbxo
Heyy, you can use tilf.com to mark you english essays. You can use it for your other subjects too but im pretty sure you you have to pay for the others apart from english lit and im not sure about language. Hope this helps :smile:)

i searched it up and apparently tilf.com is for sale..? are there any other ai marking websites you can recommend? many thanks :smile:
Reply 4
Original post by based_J
i searched it up and apparently tilf.com is for sale..? are there any other ai marking websites you can recommend? many thanks :smile:
try tilf.io
Reply 5
Original post by revision52
Hey, I got a grade 9 in gcse english language and a grade 9 in gcse english literature. (AQA) I am currently doing eng lang a level aqa so I have a good understanding of the markscheme. You can send me any essays and I'll be happy to mark :smile:

Oh thanks . If you don’t mind can you give me feedback for this question. It’s on betrayal in Macbeth

In the tragedy “Macbeth”, Shakespeare portrays the destructive, anti-Christian nature of betrayal to deter treason within society, both from feminists and catholic nobles inspired by the gunpowder plot. The extract portrays Macbeth’s initial loyalty to demonstrate how even the most valiant of soldiers can betray the king.

Initially, Shakespeare portrays Macbeth as the epitome of the traditional, chivalrous jacobean warrior to portray the sinister nature of betrayal, as he is “his kinsman and his subject”. This explicitly demonstrates Macbeth’s expectation to be obedient to the king, due to his status both in authority and in the great chain of being. Moreover, the noun “subject” implies how allegiance to the king is equivalent to loyalty to god, further enhanced as Duncan can be viewed as God’s representative on Earth according to the great chain of being. Macbeth also refers to being Duncan’s “host”; the syntax of “host” at the end is significant as it stresses the importance of xenia, a Greek principle prioritising hospitality to guests, an act more punishable than murder if breaches. Shakespeare does this to portray the significance of regicide if carried out but also implies Macbeth’s betrayal of religion as he focuses on more pagan ideologies, indicating his hamartia due to defiance of Christianity.

Moreover, the extract depicts the severity of betrayal, regicide through the glorification of Duncan. Macbeth worries that “his virtues would plead like angels, trumpet tongued”. Through the simile to “angels” and the plurality of “virtues”, it connotes the innocent, infallible nature of Duncan, who is compared to heavenly bodies, direct servants and representatives of God. Perhaps Shakespeare does this to emphasise how betrayal would dramatically disrupt the heavens itself, due to its usurpation of the king’s position in the great chain of being. Moreover, the verb “plead” is notable as it creates an almost parallel to Adam, the perfect creation of God - just how the angels prostrate to Adam, they would similarly support Duncan and “cry hold! Hold!” The dental alliteration in “trumpet tongued” connotes a deterrent against regicide as a “trumpet” signals an alert, warning, perhaps connoting how regicide is an act of blasphemy, thus resulting in biblical warfare, similar to the Battle of Jericho, which commenced at the sound of horns, a parable known by the christocentric society present in 17th century England.

At the exposition of the play, a betrayal of nature is presented through the construct of Lady Macbeth to delineate the perils of female restraint in society. Lady Macbeth defies nature and commands the “murdering ministers” to “unsex [her] here” and fill her from “the crown to the toe top full of direst cruelty”. Immediately, it presents her association of masculinity to toxic attributes e.g. aggression as she assumes an authoritative position, an inversion of the archetypal jacobean women. More critically, we could imply her desperation to assume authority as a sense of urgency / haste is created - is her motive for personal revenge for her grandfather or something more intimate e.g. success for her husband? The employment of the symbolism “crown” shows her immediate superior facade, perhaps done by Shakespeare to portray the success of female empowerment without boundaries in society, a commentary on the successive nature of Elizabeth’s reign, one without a husband to control her. However, a contrary effect is created as “toe” has connotations of bottom and descent, implying how female empowerment will only result in downfall and chaos, maybe reflective of the disorder within society on the rightful heir to the English throne. Hence Shakespeare portrays this confusion to criticise both female transgression and betrayal while also denigrating societal boundaries which forces this betrayal.

At the denouement, it is clear that the consequences of betrayal are fatalistic, perhaps to demonstrate the importance of duty in Jacobean society. In act 5, Macbeth begins to doubt his ambition and authority as he declares “Out, out, brief Candle!” Firstly, the imperative “out” displays his desperation to reverse his betrayal as a parallel is created to Lady Macbeth in Act 5 scene 1 as she also struggles with guilt of regicide “Out damned spot!” Through this, we could imply their collective struggle to stay composed despite their separation as they become inversions of their previous characters : Lady Macbeth as a manipulative femme fatale and Macbeth as an effeminate coward. Moreover, the metaphor of “candle” indicates how like wax, his life is melting away through the endless chasing of his ambition / bloodlust - “walking shadow” - it is impalpable and would only result in disaster. This anagnorisis into the futile nature of his betrayal portrays how betrayal only results in the nihilistic, meaningless end to the protagonist as he becomes plagued with guilt. The betrayal of Duncan also presents a betrayal in religion as an antithesis is created to Lady Macbeth, who acknowledges eternal damnation “hell is murky” and seeks for reconciliation, while Macbeth completely disregards religion. As a result, Shakespeare portrays the theme of betrayal as both destructive in life and religion to deter against it in society, both with feminist uprisings against the patriarchy and treason committed by Catholic extremists like the gunpowder plotter.
Original post by Rc-14
Oh thanks . If you don’t mind can you give me feedback for this question. It’s on betrayal in Macbeth
In the tragedy “Macbeth”, Shakespeare portrays the destructive, anti-Christian nature of betrayal to deter treason within society, both from feminists and catholic nobles inspired by the gunpowder plot. The extract portrays Macbeth’s initial loyalty to demonstrate how even the most valiant of soldiers can betray the king.
Initially, Shakespeare portrays Macbeth as the epitome of the traditional, chivalrous jacobean warrior to portray the sinister nature of betrayal, as he is “his kinsman and his subject”. This explicitly demonstrates Macbeth’s expectation to be obedient to the king, due to his status both in authority and in the great chain of being. Moreover, the noun “subject” implies how allegiance to the king is equivalent to loyalty to god, further enhanced as Duncan can be viewed as God’s representative on Earth according to the great chain of being. Macbeth also refers to being Duncan’s “host”; the syntax of “host” at the end is significant as it stresses the importance of xenia, a Greek principle prioritising hospitality to guests, an act more punishable than murder if breaches. Shakespeare does this to portray the significance of regicide if carried out but also implies Macbeth’s betrayal of religion as he focuses on more pagan ideologies, indicating his hamartia due to defiance of Christianity.
Moreover, the extract depicts the severity of betrayal, regicide through the glorification of Duncan. Macbeth worries that “his virtues would plead like angels, trumpet tongued”. Through the simile to “angels” and the plurality of “virtues”, it connotes the innocent, infallible nature of Duncan, who is compared to heavenly bodies, direct servants and representatives of God. Perhaps Shakespeare does this to emphasise how betrayal would dramatically disrupt the heavens itself, due to its usurpation of the king’s position in the great chain of being. Moreover, the verb “plead” is notable as it creates an almost parallel to Adam, the perfect creation of God - just how the angels prostrate to Adam, they would similarly support Duncan and “cry hold! Hold!” The dental alliteration in “trumpet tongued” connotes a deterrent against regicide as a “trumpet” signals an alert, warning, perhaps connoting how regicide is an act of blasphemy, thus resulting in biblical warfare, similar to the Battle of Jericho, which commenced at the sound of horns, a parable known by the christocentric society present in 17th century England.
At the exposition of the play, a betrayal of nature is presented through the construct of Lady Macbeth to delineate the perils of female restraint in society. Lady Macbeth defies nature and commands the “murdering ministers” to “unsex [her] here” and fill her from “the crown to the toe top full of direst cruelty”. Immediately, it presents her association of masculinity to toxic attributes e.g. aggression as she assumes an authoritative position, an inversion of the archetypal jacobean women. More critically, we could imply her desperation to assume authority as a sense of urgency / haste is created - is her motive for personal revenge for her grandfather or something more intimate e.g. success for her husband? The employment of the symbolism “crown” shows her immediate superior facade, perhaps done by Shakespeare to portray the success of female empowerment without boundaries in society, a commentary on the successive nature of Elizabeth’s reign, one without a husband to control her. However, a contrary effect is created as “toe” has connotations of bottom and descent, implying how female empowerment will only result in downfall and chaos, maybe reflective of the disorder within society on the rightful heir to the English throne. Hence Shakespeare portrays this confusion to criticise both female transgression and betrayal while also denigrating societal boundaries which forces this betrayal.
At the denouement, it is clear that the consequences of betrayal are fatalistic, perhaps to demonstrate the importance of duty in Jacobean society. In act 5, Macbeth begins to doubt his ambition and authority as he declares “Out, out, brief Candle!” Firstly, the imperative “out” displays his desperation to reverse his betrayal as a parallel is created to Lady Macbeth in Act 5 scene 1 as she also struggles with guilt of regicide “Out damned spot!” Through this, we could imply their collective struggle to stay composed despite their separation as they become inversions of their previous characters : Lady Macbeth as a manipulative femme fatale and Macbeth as an effeminate coward. Moreover, the metaphor of “candle” indicates how like wax, his life is melting away through the endless chasing of his ambition / bloodlust - “walking shadow” - it is impalpable and would only result in disaster. This anagnorisis into the futile nature of his betrayal portrays how betrayal only results in the nihilistic, meaningless end to the protagonist as he becomes plagued with guilt. The betrayal of Duncan also presents a betrayal in religion as an antithesis is created to Lady Macbeth, who acknowledges eternal damnation “hell is murky” and seeks for reconciliation, while Macbeth completely disregards religion. As a result, Shakespeare portrays the theme of betrayal as both destructive in life and religion to deter against it in society, both with feminist uprisings against the patriarchy and treason committed by Catholic extremists like the gunpowder plotter.

This is a very good response. As I was reading I was thinking of feedback but then you would go onto to say what I was thinking anyway! Personally, if this is a consistent standard you are able to write at, I dont believe you have anything to worry about.

I would say this was 27/30. Definitely in the highest band.
Original post by Rc-14
Oh thanks . If you don’t mind can you give me feedback for this question. It’s on betrayal in Macbeth
In the tragedy “Macbeth”, Shakespeare portrays the destructive, anti-Christian nature of betrayal to deter treason within society, both from feminists and catholic nobles inspired by the gunpowder plot. The extract portrays Macbeth’s initial loyalty to demonstrate how even the most valiant of soldiers can betray the king.
Initially, Shakespeare portrays Macbeth as the epitome of the traditional, chivalrous jacobean warrior to portray the sinister nature of betrayal, as he is “his kinsman and his subject”. This explicitly demonstrates Macbeth’s expectation to be obedient to the king, due to his status both in authority and in the great chain of being. Moreover, the noun “subject” implies how allegiance to the king is equivalent to loyalty to god, further enhanced as Duncan can be viewed as God’s representative on Earth according to the great chain of being. Macbeth also refers to being Duncan’s “host”; the syntax of “host” at the end is significant as it stresses the importance of xenia, a Greek principle prioritising hospitality to guests, an act more punishable than murder if breaches. Shakespeare does this to portray the significance of regicide if carried out but also implies Macbeth’s betrayal of religion as he focuses on more pagan ideologies, indicating his hamartia due to defiance of Christianity.
Moreover, the extract depicts the severity of betrayal, regicide through the glorification of Duncan. Macbeth worries that “his virtues would plead like angels, trumpet tongued”. Through the simile to “angels” and the plurality of “virtues”, it connotes the innocent, infallible nature of Duncan, who is compared to heavenly bodies, direct servants and representatives of God. Perhaps Shakespeare does this to emphasise how betrayal would dramatically disrupt the heavens itself, due to its usurpation of the king’s position in the great chain of being. Moreover, the verb “plead” is notable as it creates an almost parallel to Adam, the perfect creation of God - just how the angels prostrate to Adam, they would similarly support Duncan and “cry hold! Hold!” The dental alliteration in “trumpet tongued” connotes a deterrent against regicide as a “trumpet” signals an alert, warning, perhaps connoting how regicide is an act of blasphemy, thus resulting in biblical warfare, similar to the Battle of Jericho, which commenced at the sound of horns, a parable known by the christocentric society present in 17th century England.
At the exposition of the play, a betrayal of nature is presented through the construct of Lady Macbeth to delineate the perils of female restraint in society. Lady Macbeth defies nature and commands the “murdering ministers” to “unsex [her] here” and fill her from “the crown to the toe top full of direst cruelty”. Immediately, it presents her association of masculinity to toxic attributes e.g. aggression as she assumes an authoritative position, an inversion of the archetypal jacobean women. More critically, we could imply her desperation to assume authority as a sense of urgency / haste is created - is her motive for personal revenge for her grandfather or something more intimate e.g. success for her husband? The employment of the symbolism “crown” shows her immediate superior facade, perhaps done by Shakespeare to portray the success of female empowerment without boundaries in society, a commentary on the successive nature of Elizabeth’s reign, one without a husband to control her. However, a contrary effect is created as “toe” has connotations of bottom and descent, implying how female empowerment will only result in downfall and chaos, maybe reflective of the disorder within society on the rightful heir to the English throne. Hence Shakespeare portrays this confusion to criticise both female transgression and betrayal while also denigrating societal boundaries which forces this betrayal.
At the denouement, it is clear that the consequences of betrayal are fatalistic, perhaps to demonstrate the importance of duty in Jacobean society. In act 5, Macbeth begins to doubt his ambition and authority as he declares “Out, out, brief Candle!” Firstly, the imperative “out” displays his desperation to reverse his betrayal as a parallel is created to Lady Macbeth in Act 5 scene 1 as she also struggles with guilt of regicide “Out damned spot!” Through this, we could imply their collective struggle to stay composed despite their separation as they become inversions of their previous characters : Lady Macbeth as a manipulative femme fatale and Macbeth as an effeminate coward. Moreover, the metaphor of “candle” indicates how like wax, his life is melting away through the endless chasing of his ambition / bloodlust - “walking shadow” - it is impalpable and would only result in disaster. This anagnorisis into the futile nature of his betrayal portrays how betrayal only results in the nihilistic, meaningless end to the protagonist as he becomes plagued with guilt. The betrayal of Duncan also presents a betrayal in religion as an antithesis is created to Lady Macbeth, who acknowledges eternal damnation “hell is murky” and seeks for reconciliation, while Macbeth completely disregards religion. As a result, Shakespeare portrays the theme of betrayal as both destructive in life and religion to deter against it in society, both with feminist uprisings against the patriarchy and treason committed by Catholic extremists like the gunpowder plotter.
Hey this is quite long, do you think you could write an answer to Macbeth in the exam under 50 mins with an unseen question and extract? But, good language analysis , you could incorporate structural analysis of the play in this as well. Good context and paragraph structure
Original post by Georgeallen
This is a very good response. As I was reading I was thinking of feedback but then you would go onto to say what I was thinking anyway! Personally, if this is a consistent standard you are able to write at, I dont believe you have anything to worry about.
I would say this was 27/30. Definitely in the highest band.


hi can you mark mine the question was happiness and joy in a christmas carol


In the novel a christmas carol we can see that Dickens wanted to present christmas as a joyful charitable time. We first see this through the character Fred when he says “I have always thought of christmas as a good time, a kind forgiving charitable time” this quote shows that Fred is a kind hearted man which contrasts to scrooges selfish miserable behaviour when he doesn’t donate to the charity men. In addition to this the word “charitable” also portrays Fred’s giving nature and how he wants to help the poor. This idea of helping the poor also links to Dickens views and how he believes everyone should be able to have a joyful time at christmas no matter the social class.

Furthermore we can see how Dickens presents idea of joy and happiness through the ghost of christmas present. This ghost is described as a “jolly giant who bore a glowing torch” the “glowing torch” can be seen as a symbol for happiness and how the ghost of christmas present represents positivity and joy. In addition to this the ghost of christmas past is also described as a “jolly giant” who wears a holly wreath. It can be seen that this ghost is compared to santa and that Dickens wanted to use this ghost to spread christmas joy and represent good will. The ghost of christmas presents joy is used to transform scrooge which further links to Dickens idea that happiness and joy can transform people.

Additionally Dickens presents the cratchits as a jovial family even though they are a victim of poverty. Large family’s like the cratchits were common in the 19th century so Dickens made the cratchits to be an accurate representation of this. He also focuses on the family’s unity to convey the idea that poverty is not a barrier to happiness. We can further see this when Tiny Tim says “God bless everyone” this shows Tiny Tim wants to spread happiness to everyone- even to those who are selfish like scrooge.

Lastly we see ideas of happiness and joy in a christmas carol though the character fezziwig. Fezziwig is presented as a “jolly fat man” in this novel who is used to contrast scrooges behaviour. Scrooge was happiest when he was working for fezziwig which is shown when scrooge sees the “bright face of his former self” furthermore fezziwig treats his employees with kindness by letting them have christmas off “no work tonight it’s christmas eve” this quote shows how fezziwig embraces the joys of christmas unlike scrooge who sees it as “an excuse to pickpocket a man every 25th”
Original post by izzy56788
hi can you mark mine the question was happiness and joy in a christmas carol
In the novel a christmas carol we can see that Dickens wanted to present christmas as a joyful charitable time. We first see this through the character Fred when he says “I have always thought of christmas as a good time, a kind forgiving charitable time” this quote shows that Fred is a kind hearted man which contrasts to scrooges selfish miserable behaviour when he doesn’t donate to the charity men. In addition to this the word “charitable” also portrays Fred’s giving nature and how he wants to help the poor. This idea of helping the poor also links to Dickens views and how he believes everyone should be able to have a joyful time at christmas no matter the social class.
Furthermore we can see how Dickens presents idea of joy and happiness through the ghost of christmas present. This ghost is described as a “jolly giant who bore a glowing torch” the “glowing torch” can be seen as a symbol for happiness and how the ghost of christmas present represents positivity and joy. In addition to this the ghost of christmas past is also described as a “jolly giant” who wears a holly wreath. It can be seen that this ghost is compared to santa and that Dickens wanted to use this ghost to spread christmas joy and represent good will. The ghost of christmas presents joy is used to transform scrooge which further links to Dickens idea that happiness and joy can transform people.
Additionally Dickens presents the cratchits as a jovial family even though they are a victim of poverty. Large family’s like the cratchits were common in the 19th century so Dickens made the cratchits to be an accurate representation of this. He also focuses on the family’s unity to convey the idea that poverty is not a barrier to happiness. We can further see this when Tiny Tim says “God bless everyone” this shows Tiny Tim wants to spread happiness to everyone- even to those who are selfish like scrooge.
Lastly we see ideas of happiness and joy in a christmas carol though the character fezziwig. Fezziwig is presented as a “jolly fat man” in this novel who is used to contrast scrooges behaviour. Scrooge was happiest when he was working for fezziwig which is shown when scrooge sees the “bright face of his former self” furthermore fezziwig treats his employees with kindness by letting them have christmas off “no work tonight it’s christmas eve” this quote shows how fezziwig embraces the joys of christmas unlike scrooge who sees it as “an excuse to pickpocket a man every 25th”

extract please
Original post by revision52
extract please


i didn’t write the extract answer i just did it on the whole novel lol
Original post by izzy56788
i didn’t write the extract answer i just did it on the whole novel lol

Oh without the extract you are capped to level 3. Maybe, you could add some ideas about the extract and then send the new version to me? Or I can provide general WWW and EBI instead of giving a mark
Original post by revision52
Oh without the extract you are capped to level 3. Maybe, you could add some ideas about the extract and then send the new version to me? Or I can provide general WWW and EBI instead of giving a mark


hi ebi and www would be good thanks also i meant that the question didn’t come with an extract it was just how does Dickens present ideas about joy and happiness through the whole novel i can try and find a question that has an extract with it

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