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Mark my Jekyll and Hyde essay please

Starting with this extract, explore how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society.
Write about:
how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde in this extract
how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society in the novel as a whole.

[30 marks]



Read the following extract from Chapter 8 (The Last Night) of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and then answer the question that follows. In this extract Poole, Jekyll’s servant, talks with Utterson about events at Jekyll’s house.


“That's it!” said Poole. “It was this way. I came suddenly into the theatre from the garden. It seems he had slipped out to look for this drug, or whatever it is; for the cabinet door was open, and there he was at the far end of the room digging among the crates. He looked up when I came in, gave a kind of cry, and whipped upstairs into the cabinet. It was but for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood up on my head like quills. Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face? If it was my master, why did he cry out like a rat, and run from me? I have served him long enough. And then …”, the man paused and passed his hand over his face. “These are all very strange circumstances,” said Mr. Utterson, “but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and his avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery God grant that he be not deceived. There is my explanation; it is sad enough, Poole, ay, and appalling to consider; but it is plain and natural, hangs well together, and delivers us from all exorbitant alarms.” “Sir,” said the butler, turning to a sort of mottled pallor, “that thing was not my master, and there’s the truth. My master” here he looked round him and began to whisper “is a tall, fine build of a man, and this was more of a dwarf.” Utterson attempted to protest. “O sir,” cried Poole, “do you think I do not know my master after twenty years? do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done.”


In Robert Louis Stevenson’s Gothic detective novella , “The Strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde the writer explores the story of the respected Dr Henry Jekyll who separates the evil part of him into another form by the name of Mr Hyde.Stevenson characterises Mr Hyde as a disturbing member of society with inhuman characteristics.This is achieved through the contrast in the actions of Jekyll and Hyde as well as his character possessing animal qualities and connotations with the devil.

In the beginning of the novella Stevenson establishes Dr.Jekyll to be wholly good meanwhile his other form, Mr.Hyde is presented as “wholly evil” highlighting him to be a disturbing member of society.In Victorian England upper class ‘Victorian gentlemen’ were held to a high standard of moral scrutiny , they were expected to be perfect,upstanding, reputable members of society that repressed any desires.The effects of these attitudes can be seen in the actions of Hyde.Mr Hyde is described as murdering Sir Danvers Carew “With ape like fury trampling over his victim”.This simile depicts Hyde as the very incarnation of evil.The word choice “ape” connotes that Hyde is undeveloped and primitive ,and therefore inhuman,in his brutal act of violence. This idea is then reinforced with the noun “fury” alluding that Hyde’s violence is senseless and uncontrolled . This is in stark contrast to the actions of Dr Jekyll who is introduced via report and is hailed as “One your fellows who do what they call good” and the “Very pink of the properties”.It is likely Stevenon constructs this contrast in order to present Hyde as a disturbing member of society meanwhile Dr Jekyll serves as the conventional Victorian gentleman highlighting that society’s expectation of a good and evil man are unrealistic.Hyde is the result of Dr Jekyll trying to conform to society’s unrealistic expectation of a gentleman driving him to attempt to separate the two parts that form the duality of man leaving a “creature” that is “wholly evil” which Stevenson would view as inhuman as all humans are capable of good and evil.Perhaps Stevenson may be trying to redefine what makes someone a good man , that being the ability to control their natural desire to do evil in favour of what is good.This may cause the reader to reflect on their idea of what makes someone good.Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as a disturbing member of society from the beginning of the novella through his uncontrolled violent actions which are contrasted to that of the good natured Dr Jekyll.



In the extract the author presents Hyde as inhuman characterising him as an animalistic “creature”.Around this time Charles Darwin published his theory of evolution which claims that humans evolved from a common ancestor with apes this caused much controversy in the deeply religious Victorian England as well as stirring fears of human ‘devolution’ these fears are reflected in Stevenson’s portrayal of Hyde.In the extract Poole recalls his reaction to seeing Hyde noting his “hair stood up on my head like quills” This simile compares Poole’s fear of seeing Hyde to the fear of a porcupine when it encounters a predator implying that Hyde is a predator while Poole is the prey.The personification of Poole’s hair standing in the verb “stood” illustrates Poole being startled and shocked by Hyde’s “troglodytic” appearance. And inhuman appearance.The sentiment of Hyde being like an animal is predominant in the extract as seen by the quote “he cry out like a rat” this simile comparing Hyde to a rodents builds upon the zoomorphism of Hyde as he is described as “digging” rather than looking or searching among the crates suggesting the action to be primitive like a dog.This notion would scare a Victorian reader who ,like Stevenson, feared the prospect of devolution.It could be interpreted that Stevenson is reflecting society’s fears of the rapid advancements of science and its effect on people as hysteria grew over fears of the devolution of mankind.Perhaps Dr.Jekyll has devolved leading his to regress to an “ape-like” form.It could be possible Stevenson is suggesting society must reject science and go against its rapid developments this idea of Stevensons rejection and resentment of science is reinforced in the end of the novella as both scientists,Lanyon and Jekyll are dead.


At the end of the novella Hyde is presented though Dr.Jekyll’s statement as “inherently evil” and a disturbing member of society with the use of connotations of the devil and animal
imagery.In Victorian England there was a prevalent ‘gentlemen’ culture among upper class men which Dr.Jekyll and most other characters would of been this culture entailed an obsession with maintaining a perfect reputation in society this often involving one repressing any feelings and desires that may harm a ‘gentleman’s’ reputation. This can be seen in Jekyll’s statement at the end of the novella ,” My devil had been long caged,he came out roaring.”This metaphor could possible communicate that Jekyll has always felt this duality within him and he has long struggled to control it.This leading him to create Hyde who is the very culmination of Jekyll’s deep dark desires.Hyde being evil can be seen in Jekyll referring to him as the “devil” a comparison that would terrify a deeply religious Victorian reader.Moreover Hyde is described as being “caged” suggesting Hyde cannot be controlled unless imprisoned like an animal.This idea is supported with the adjective “roaring” invoking images of Hyde being like a beast.Through Stevenson’s depiction of Hyde the writer may be indicating that it is impossible to isolate one’s good or evil characteristics this interpretation is supported by Jekyll going on to say “All beings as we meet them are commingled out of good and evil” meaning that all humans are capable of being a disturbing member of society like Hyde as evil is within all of us.Stevenson could be calling for Victorain attitudes to change and to recognise that anyone from the working class to a respected doctor is capable to good and evil regardless of their reputation. Stevenson presents Hyde through the words of Dr.Jekyll as inhuman and a disturbing member of society through connotations of the devil and animal imagery.


In conclusion Robert Louis Stevenson in the extract and throughout his novella “The strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde” presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society though the contrast of him as evil opposed to Jekyll as good.Futhermore Stevenson employs animal imagery and connotations to the devil to construct Hyde as a deeply disturbing and inhuman character.
Reply 1
Original post by joshuaofjoshaus
Starting with this extract, explore how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society.
Write about:
how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde in this extract
how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society in the novel as a whole.
[30 marks]
Read the following extract from Chapter 8 (The Last Night) of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and then answer the question that follows. In this extract Poole, Jekyll’s servant, talks with Utterson about events at Jekyll’s house.
“That's it!” said Poole. “It was this way. I came suddenly into the theatre from the garden. It seems he had slipped out to look for this drug, or whatever it is; for the cabinet door was open, and there he was at the far end of the room digging among the crates. He looked up when I came in, gave a kind of cry, and whipped upstairs into the cabinet. It was but for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood up on my head like quills. Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face? If it was my master, why did he cry out like a rat, and run from me? I have served him long enough. And then …”, the man paused and passed his hand over his face. “These are all very strange circumstances,” said Mr. Utterson, “but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and his avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery God grant that he be not deceived. There is my explanation; it is sad enough, Poole, ay, and appalling to consider; but it is plain and natural, hangs well together, and delivers us from all exorbitant alarms.” “Sir,” said the butler, turning to a sort of mottled pallor, “that thing was not my master, and there’s the truth. My master” here he looked round him and began to whisper “is a tall, fine build of a man, and this was more of a dwarf.” Utterson attempted to protest. “O sir,” cried Poole, “do you think I do not know my master after twenty years? do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done.”
In Robert Louis Stevenson’s Gothic detective novella , “The Strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde the writer explores the story of the respected Dr Henry Jekyll who separates the evil part of him into another form by the name of Mr Hyde.Stevenson characterises Mr Hyde as a disturbing member of society with inhuman characteristics.This is achieved through the contrast in the actions of Jekyll and Hyde as well as his character possessing animal qualities and connotations with the devil.
In the beginning of the novella Stevenson establishes Dr.Jekyll to be wholly good meanwhile his other form, Mr.Hyde is presented as “wholly evil” highlighting him to be a disturbing member of society.In Victorian England upper class ‘Victorian gentlemen’ were held to a high standard of moral scrutiny , they were expected to be perfect,upstanding, reputable members of society that repressed any desires.The effects of these attitudes can be seen in the actions of Hyde.Mr Hyde is described as murdering Sir Danvers Carew “With ape like fury trampling over his victim”.This simile depicts Hyde as the very incarnation of evil.The word choice “ape” connotes that Hyde is undeveloped and primitive ,and therefore inhuman,in his brutal act of violence. This idea is then reinforced with the noun “fury” alluding that Hyde’s violence is senseless and uncontrolled . This is in stark contrast to the actions of Dr Jekyll who is introduced via report and is hailed as “One your fellows who do what they call good” and the “Very pink of the properties”.It is likely Stevenon constructs this contrast in order to present Hyde as a disturbing member of society meanwhile Dr Jekyll serves as the conventional Victorian gentleman highlighting that society’s expectation of a good and evil man are unrealistic.Hyde is the result of Dr Jekyll trying to conform to society’s unrealistic expectation of a gentleman driving him to attempt to separate the two parts that form the duality of man leaving a “creature” that is “wholly evil” which Stevenson would view as inhuman as all humans are capable of good and evil.Perhaps Stevenson may be trying to redefine what makes someone a good man , that being the ability to control their natural desire to do evil in favour of what is good.This may cause the reader to reflect on their idea of what makes someone good.Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as a disturbing member of society from the beginning of the novella through his uncontrolled violent actions which are contrasted to that of the good natured Dr Jekyll.
In the extract the author presents Hyde as inhuman characterising him as an animalistic “creature”.Around this time Charles Darwin published his theory of evolution which claims that humans evolved from a common ancestor with apes this caused much controversy in the deeply religious Victorian England as well as stirring fears of human ‘devolution’ these fears are reflected in Stevenson’s portrayal of Hyde.In the extract Poole recalls his reaction to seeing Hyde noting his “hair stood up on my head like quills” This simile compares Poole’s fear of seeing Hyde to the fear of a porcupine when it encounters a predator implying that Hyde is a predator while Poole is the prey.The personification of Poole’s hair standing in the verb “stood” illustrates Poole being startled and shocked by Hyde’s “troglodytic” appearance. And inhuman appearance.The sentiment of Hyde being like an animal is predominant in the extract as seen by the quote “he cry out like a rat” this simile comparing Hyde to a rodents builds upon the zoomorphism of Hyde as he is described as “digging” rather than looking or searching among the crates suggesting the action to be primitive like a dog.This notion would scare a Victorian reader who ,like Stevenson, feared the prospect of devolution.It could be interpreted that Stevenson is reflecting society’s fears of the rapid advancements of science and its effect on people as hysteria grew over fears of the devolution of mankind.Perhaps Dr.Jekyll has devolved leading his to regress to an “ape-like” form.It could be possible Stevenson is suggesting society must reject science and go against its rapid developments this idea of Stevensons rejection and resentment of science is reinforced in the end of the novella as both scientists,Lanyon and Jekyll are dead.
At the end of the novella Hyde is presented though Dr.Jekyll’s statement as “inherently evil” and a disturbing member of society with the use of connotations of the devil and animal
imagery.In Victorian England there was a prevalent ‘gentlemen’ culture among upper class men which Dr.Jekyll and most other characters would of been this culture entailed an obsession with maintaining a perfect reputation in society this often involving one repressing any feelings and desires that may harm a ‘gentleman’s’ reputation. This can be seen in Jekyll’s statement at the end of the novella ,” My devil had been long caged,he came out roaring.”This metaphor could possible communicate that Jekyll has always felt this duality within him and he has long struggled to control it.This leading him to create Hyde who is the very culmination of Jekyll’s deep dark desires.Hyde being evil can be seen in Jekyll referring to him as the “devil” a comparison that would terrify a deeply religious Victorian reader.Moreover Hyde is described as being “caged” suggesting Hyde cannot be controlled unless imprisoned like an animal.This idea is supported with the adjective “roaring” invoking images of Hyde being like a beast.Through Stevenson’s depiction of Hyde the writer may be indicating that it is impossible to isolate one’s good or evil characteristics this interpretation is supported by Jekyll going on to say “All beings as we meet them are commingled out of good and evil” meaning that all humans are capable of being a disturbing member of society like Hyde as evil is within all of us.Stevenson could be calling for Victorain attitudes to change and to recognise that anyone from the working class to a respected doctor is capable to good and evil regardless of their reputation. Stevenson presents Hyde through the words of Dr.Jekyll as inhuman and a disturbing member of society through connotations of the devil and animal imagery.
In conclusion Robert Louis Stevenson in the extract and throughout his novella “The strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde” presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society though the contrast of him as evil opposed to Jekyll as good.Futhermore Stevenson employs animal imagery and connotations to the devil to construct Hyde as a deeply disturbing and inhuman character.

About to take my A-Level English Lit in May, which I'm predicted an A* for, and I got a 9 in English Language and English Lterature at GCSE, so hopefully I can help you a bit :smile:

Some things I liked:

Good use of context

Good use of embedded quotes

You have referenced the extract and the novella as a whole

I like how you have written in a sort of chronological order


Some things to note:

There are a few SPAG errors e.g "ivoked" rather than "evoked", and points where you should use a comma- I know it's not worth too much but SPAG is easy marks so it's good to focus on

Make the conclusion a bit longer- even though you are summarising your points, try not to make it seem bolted on and create a clear synthesis statement

Again, the introduction could be longer and a clearer thesis which outlines your points for discussion

Maybe write about more methods; an easy way to do this is writing "the adjective" or "the noun" instead of "the word"


I haven't given you a mark, but personally I would guess at top band (I don't really know the mark scheme so this is just my opinion). I have been really picky though, and this is an excellent response!

Best of luck in your exams :smile:
Reply 2
Original post by joshuaofjoshaus
Starting with this extract, explore how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society.
Write about:
how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde in this extract
how Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society in the novel as a whole.
[30 marks]
Read the following extract from Chapter 8 (The Last Night) of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and then answer the question that follows. In this extract Poole, Jekyll’s servant, talks with Utterson about events at Jekyll’s house.
“That's it!” said Poole. “It was this way. I came suddenly into the theatre from the garden. It seems he had slipped out to look for this drug, or whatever it is; for the cabinet door was open, and there he was at the far end of the room digging among the crates. He looked up when I came in, gave a kind of cry, and whipped upstairs into the cabinet. It was but for one minute that I saw him, but the hair stood up on my head like quills. Sir, if that was my master, why had he a mask upon his face? If it was my master, why did he cry out like a rat, and run from me? I have served him long enough. And then …”, the man paused and passed his hand over his face. “These are all very strange circumstances,” said Mr. Utterson, “but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is plainly seized with one of those maladies that both torture and deform the sufferer; hence, for aught I know, the alteration of his voice; hence the mask and his avoidance of his friends; hence his eagerness to find this drug, by means of which the poor soul retains some hope of ultimate recovery God grant that he be not deceived. There is my explanation; it is sad enough, Poole, ay, and appalling to consider; but it is plain and natural, hangs well together, and delivers us from all exorbitant alarms.” “Sir,” said the butler, turning to a sort of mottled pallor, “that thing was not my master, and there’s the truth. My master” here he looked round him and began to whisper “is a tall, fine build of a man, and this was more of a dwarf.” Utterson attempted to protest. “O sir,” cried Poole, “do you think I do not know my master after twenty years? do you think I do not know where his head comes to in the cabinet door, where I saw him every morning of my life? No, sir, that thing in the mask was never Dr. Jekyll God knows what it was, but it was never Dr. Jekyll; and it is the belief of my heart that there was murder done.”
In Robert Louis Stevenson’s Gothic detective novella , “The Strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde the writer explores the story of the respected Dr Henry Jekyll who separates the evil part of him into another form by the name of Mr Hyde.Stevenson characterises Mr Hyde as a disturbing member of society with inhuman characteristics.This is achieved through the contrast in the actions of Jekyll and Hyde as well as his character possessing animal qualities and connotations with the devil.
In the beginning of the novella Stevenson establishes Dr.Jekyll to be wholly good meanwhile his other form, Mr.Hyde is presented as “wholly evil” highlighting him to be a disturbing member of society.In Victorian England upper class ‘Victorian gentlemen’ were held to a high standard of moral scrutiny , they were expected to be perfect,upstanding, reputable members of society that repressed any desires.The effects of these attitudes can be seen in the actions of Hyde.Mr Hyde is described as murdering Sir Danvers Carew “With ape like fury trampling over his victim”.This simile depicts Hyde as the very incarnation of evil.The word choice “ape” connotes that Hyde is undeveloped and primitive ,and therefore inhuman,in his brutal act of violence. This idea is then reinforced with the noun “fury” alluding that Hyde’s violence is senseless and uncontrolled . This is in stark contrast to the actions of Dr Jekyll who is introduced via report and is hailed as “One your fellows who do what they call good” and the “Very pink of the properties”.It is likely Stevenon constructs this contrast in order to present Hyde as a disturbing member of society meanwhile Dr Jekyll serves as the conventional Victorian gentleman highlighting that society’s expectation of a good and evil man are unrealistic.Hyde is the result of Dr Jekyll trying to conform to society’s unrealistic expectation of a gentleman driving him to attempt to separate the two parts that form the duality of man leaving a “creature” that is “wholly evil” which Stevenson would view as inhuman as all humans are capable of good and evil.Perhaps Stevenson may be trying to redefine what makes someone a good man , that being the ability to control their natural desire to do evil in favour of what is good.This may cause the reader to reflect on their idea of what makes someone good.Stevenson presents Mr Hyde as a disturbing member of society from the beginning of the novella through his uncontrolled violent actions which are contrasted to that of the good natured Dr Jekyll.
In the extract the author presents Hyde as inhuman characterising him as an animalistic “creature”.Around this time Charles Darwin published his theory of evolution which claims that humans evolved from a common ancestor with apes this caused much controversy in the deeply religious Victorian England as well as stirring fears of human ‘devolution’ these fears are reflected in Stevenson’s portrayal of Hyde.In the extract Poole recalls his reaction to seeing Hyde noting his “hair stood up on my head like quills” This simile compares Poole’s fear of seeing Hyde to the fear of a porcupine when it encounters a predator implying that Hyde is a predator while Poole is the prey.The personification of Poole’s hair standing in the verb “stood” illustrates Poole being startled and shocked by Hyde’s “troglodytic” appearance. And inhuman appearance.The sentiment of Hyde being like an animal is predominant in the extract as seen by the quote “he cry out like a rat” this simile comparing Hyde to a rodents builds upon the zoomorphism of Hyde as he is described as “digging” rather than looking or searching among the crates suggesting the action to be primitive like a dog.This notion would scare a Victorian reader who ,like Stevenson, feared the prospect of devolution.It could be interpreted that Stevenson is reflecting society’s fears of the rapid advancements of science and its effect on people as hysteria grew over fears of the devolution of mankind.Perhaps Dr.Jekyll has devolved leading his to regress to an “ape-like” form.It could be possible Stevenson is suggesting society must reject science and go against its rapid developments this idea of Stevensons rejection and resentment of science is reinforced in the end of the novella as both scientists,Lanyon and Jekyll are dead.
At the end of the novella Hyde is presented though Dr.Jekyll’s statement as “inherently evil” and a disturbing member of society with the use of connotations of the devil and animal
imagery.In Victorian England there was a prevalent ‘gentlemen’ culture among upper class men which Dr.Jekyll and most other characters would of been this culture entailed an obsession with maintaining a perfect reputation in society this often involving one repressing any feelings and desires that may harm a ‘gentleman’s’ reputation. This can be seen in Jekyll’s statement at the end of the novella ,” My devil had been long caged,he came out roaring.”This metaphor could possible communicate that Jekyll has always felt this duality within him and he has long struggled to control it.This leading him to create Hyde who is the very culmination of Jekyll’s deep dark desires.Hyde being evil can be seen in Jekyll referring to him as the “devil” a comparison that would terrify a deeply religious Victorian reader.Moreover Hyde is described as being “caged” suggesting Hyde cannot be controlled unless imprisoned like an animal.This idea is supported with the adjective “roaring” invoking images of Hyde being like a beast.Through Stevenson’s depiction of Hyde the writer may be indicating that it is impossible to isolate one’s good or evil characteristics this interpretation is supported by Jekyll going on to say “All beings as we meet them are commingled out of good and evil” meaning that all humans are capable of being a disturbing member of society like Hyde as evil is within all of us.Stevenson could be calling for Victorain attitudes to change and to recognise that anyone from the working class to a respected doctor is capable to good and evil regardless of their reputation. Stevenson presents Hyde through the words of Dr.Jekyll as inhuman and a disturbing member of society through connotations of the devil and animal imagery.
In conclusion Robert Louis Stevenson in the extract and throughout his novella “The strange case of Dr.Jekyll and Mr Hyde” presents Mr Hyde as an inhuman and disturbing member of society though the contrast of him as evil opposed to Jekyll as good.Futhermore Stevenson employs animal imagery and connotations to the devil to construct Hyde as a deeply disturbing and inhuman character.

About to take my A-Level English Lit in May, which I'm predicted an A* for, and I got a 9 in English Language and English Lterature at GCSE, so hopefully I can help you a bit :smile:

Some things I liked:

Good use of context

Good use of embedded quotes

You have referenced the extract and the novella as a whole

I like how you have written in a sort of chronological order


Some things to note:

There are a few SPAG errors e.g "ivoked" rather than "evoked", and points where you should use a comma- I know it's not worth too much but SPAG is easy marks so it's good to focus on

Make the conclusion a bit longer- even though you are summarising your points, try not to make it seem bolted on and create a clear synthesis statement

Again, the introduction could be longer and a clearer thesis which outlines your points for discussion

Maybe write about more methods; an easy way to do this is writing "the adjective" or "the noun" instead of "the word"


I haven't given you a mark, but personally I would guess at top band (I don't really know the mark scheme so this is just my opinion). I have been really picky though, and this is an excellent response!

Best of luck in your exams :smile:
DO NOT POST ESSAYS ONLINE!

You have just given everyone else your essay to copy for free - and this will be picked up by all plagiarism software when you submit it. You will now need to delete this - and then entirely rewrite it.

PLEASE dont do this!
Original post by 176253
About to take my A-Level English Lit in May, which I'm predicted an A* for, and I got a 9 in English Language and English Lterature at GCSE, so hopefully I can help you a bit :smile:
Some things I liked:

Good use of context

Good use of embedded quotes

You have referenced the extract and the novella as a whole

I like how you have written in a sort of chronological order


Some things to note:

There are a few SPAG errors e.g "ivoked" rather than "evoked", and points where you should use a comma- I know it's not worth too much but SPAG is easy marks so it's good to focus on

Make the conclusion a bit longer- even though you are summarising your points, try not to make it seem bolted on and create a clear synthesis statement

Again, the introduction could be longer and a clearer thesis which outlines your points for discussion

Maybe write about more methods; an easy way to do this is writing "the adjective" or "the noun" instead of "the word"


I haven't given you a mark, but personally I would guess at top band (I don't really know the mark scheme so this is just my opinion). I have been really picky though, and this is an excellent response!
Best of luck in your exams :smile:

Tysm

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