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Spanish A-level IRP help

I’m doing my Spanish A-level speaking exam next week and was wondering if anyone could help with possible questions for the 10 min discussion.
My topic title is ‘The life and work of Salvador Dali’ and my bullet points are:
- The influence of Dali’s early life on his work
- His recognisable style of work
- His iconic symbols and their significance
- The lobster telephone (sculpture)
- His relationship with Gala and her role as his muse
- Dream cause by the flight of a bee (painting)
- Sigmund Freud’s influence on Dali’s work

I’m worried that for the points in particular ‘The lobster Telephone’ and ‘Dream cause by the flight of a bee’, that I’ll be asked about how it was made, or the influence etc, where instead I’ve focused my research on what the art work actually is and the meanings behind it. In that case, would it be ok to say to the examiner ‘I focused my research more on…’

I also saw a past exam where the examiner asked ‘Do you think Dali was crazy?’
Do you think I could be asked something like this despite my bullet points or presentation not mentioning it.
A lot of my research is fact based and talking about his fascination with dreams and the subconscious mind, but a lot of past exams involved examiners asking a lot of opinions which sometimes weren’t even covered in the bullet points/ presentation.

Would be great of anyone could give some advice on this. Thank you!
Original post by melitagenia
I’m doing my Spanish A-level speaking exam next week and was wondering if anyone could help with possible questions for the 10 min discussion.
My topic title is ‘The life and work of Salvador Dali’ and my bullet points are:
- The influence of Dali’s early life on his work
- His recognisable style of work
- His iconic symbols and their significance
- The lobster telephone (sculpture)
- His relationship with Gala and her role as his muse
- Dream cause by the flight of a bee (painting)
- Sigmund Freud’s influence on Dali’s work
I’m worried that for the points in particular ‘The lobster Telephone’ and ‘Dream cause by the flight of a bee’, that I’ll be asked about how it was made, or the influence etc, where instead I’ve focused my research on what the art work actually is and the meanings behind it. In that case, would it be ok to say to the examiner ‘I focused my research more on…’
I also saw a past exam where the examiner asked ‘Do you think Dali was crazy?’
Do you think I could be asked something like this despite my bullet points or presentation not mentioning it.
A lot of my research is fact based and talking about his fascination with dreams and the subconscious mind, but a lot of past exams involved examiners asking a lot of opinions which sometimes weren’t even covered in the bullet points/ presentation.
Would be great of anyone could give some advice on this. Thank you!

Hi! I actually did my research project on Kahlo and Dali, so I can relate to this!

I think the important thing to remember is that it's still a conversation, so if you get asked 'Do you think Dali was crazy?' try not to panic about the fact that it wasn't on your prepared question list, and instead consider how you actually would respond to that question, do you think he was crazy?

You can also always ask questions back, to redirect the topic back into what you feel comfortable discussing. You could for example, bring it back to your research in the subconscious and dreams by saying 'I think his work was affected by his interest in dreams and the subconscious, so in this iconic work 'Lobster telephone', we can see the effect of dreams through xyz, which some may simply call crazy. What do you think?'

Good luck, you got this!
Reply 2
Original post by Yipiyap_Brooke
Hi! I actually did my research project on Kahlo and Dali, so I can relate to this!
I think the important thing to remember is that it's still a conversation, so if you get asked 'Do you think Dali was crazy?' try not to panic about the fact that it wasn't on your prepared question list, and instead consider how you actually would respond to that question, do you think he was crazy?
You can also always ask questions back, to redirect the topic back into what you feel comfortable discussing. You could for example, bring it back to your research in the subconscious and dreams by saying 'I think his work was affected by his interest in dreams and the subconscious, so in this iconic work 'Lobster telephone', we can see the effect of dreams through xyz, which some may simply call crazy. What do you think?'
Good luck, you got this!

Thanks so much that was super helpful, will defo take you advice about redirecting the question! :smile:
Original post by melitagenia
I’m doing my Spanish A-level speaking exam next week and was wondering if anyone could help with possible questions for the 10 min discussion.
My topic title is ‘The life and work of Salvador Dali’ and my bullet points are:
- The influence of Dali’s early life on his work
- His recognisable style of work
- His iconic symbols and their significance
- The lobster telephone (sculpture)
- His relationship with Gala and her role as his muse
- Dream cause by the flight of a bee (painting)
- Sigmund Freud’s influence on Dali’s work
I’m worried that for the points in particular ‘The lobster Telephone’ and ‘Dream cause by the flight of a bee’, that I’ll be asked about how it was made, or the influence etc, where instead I’ve focused my research on what the art work actually is and the meanings behind it. In that case, would it be ok to say to the examiner ‘I focused my research more on…’
I also saw a past exam where the examiner asked ‘Do you think Dali was crazy?’
Do you think I could be asked something like this despite my bullet points or presentation not mentioning it.
A lot of my research is fact based and talking about his fascination with dreams and the subconscious mind, but a lot of past exams involved examiners asking a lot of opinions which sometimes weren’t even covered in the bullet points/ presentation.
Would be great of anyone could give some advice on this. Thank you!

did you do a card ?
Reply 4
Original post by melitagenia
I’m doing my Spanish A-level speaking exam next week and was wondering if anyone could help with possible questions for the 10 min discussion.
My topic title is ‘The life and work of Salvador Dali’ and my bullet points are:
- The influence of Dali’s early life on his work
- His recognisable style of work
- His iconic symbols and their significance
- The lobster telephone (sculpture)
- His relationship with Gala and her role as his muse
- Dream cause by the flight of a bee (painting)
- Sigmund Freud’s influence on Dali’s work
I’m worried that for the points in particular ‘The lobster Telephone’ and ‘Dream cause by the flight of a bee’, that I’ll be asked about how it was made, or the influence etc, where instead I’ve focused my research on what the art work actually is and the meanings behind it. In that case, would it be ok to say to the examiner ‘I focused my research more on…’
I also saw a past exam where the examiner asked ‘Do you think Dali was crazy?’
Do you think I could be asked something like this despite my bullet points or presentation not mentioning it.
A lot of my research is fact based and talking about his fascination with dreams and the subconscious mind, but a lot of past exams involved examiners asking a lot of opinions which sometimes weren’t even covered in the bullet points/ presentation.
Would be great of anyone could give some advice on this. Thank you!

what exam board?

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