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chemistry at uni?

hello i am currently in year 12 and am looking into which courses i would like to do in uni. out of my alevels i am enjoying chemistry the most so i am looking into the different chemistry degrees available in the uk across all unis

i have looked into the different branches like chemical engineering, biochemistry, pharmacolgy ect.. but the ones whic seem the most interesing to me is medicinal chem and chemistry by itself.

i was wondering if anyone could tell me their experiences of doing chemistry at uni and if there are any other branches of chemistry i maybe have missed that relate to anything with medicine/healthcare
Hello @leonardenjdeb!

It's fantastic to hear that you're enjoying chemistry and considering pursuing it further at university. As a current Dietetics student at the Uni of Herts, I've found that chemistry plays a significant role in understanding the science behind nutrition and its impact on health. While I'm not directly studying chemistry as a standalone degree, I can attest to its relevance in the field of healthcare and medicine. Medicinal chemistry is indeed an intriguing field that bridges chemistry with pharmaceuticals, exploring the development of new drugs and treatments. Additionally, you might also want to explore branches such as biochemistry, which delves into the molecular basis of biological processes, including those related to health and disease. Choosing the right degree program is important, so I recommend researching each option thoroughly and perhaps even reaching out to current students or lecturers in those programs to gain further insights.

Best of luck with your decision-making process!

All the best,
Natacha
Original post by leonardenjdeb
hello i am currently in year 12 and am looking into which courses i would like to do in uni. out of my alevels i am enjoying chemistry the most so i am looking into the different chemistry degrees available in the uk across all unis
i have looked into the different branches like chemical engineering, biochemistry, pharmacolgy ect.. but the ones whic seem the most interesing to me is medicinal chem and chemistry by itself.
i was wondering if anyone could tell me their experiences of doing chemistry at uni and if there are any other branches of chemistry i maybe have missed that relate to anything with medicine/healthcare

Hiya,

I'm currently a third-year chemistry student at Lancaster University. In my experience of studying chemistry, I have overall enjoyed it. There is lots of variation in the modules that you study ranging from electrochemistry, aromatic chemistry, thermodynamics and biomedical imaging. At Lancaster specifically, you have optional modules in third year that can vary depending on the lecturers research fields which is why I am able to study biomedical imaging. When you're researching chemistry degrees, be sure to look for programs that offer modules or specialisations in areas related to medicinal chemistry.

We also spend lots of time in the labs doing practicals which is great for increasing practical skills for industry. In third year, you take on a project where you design your own experiments and do original research which is very different from anything I've ever done before. I have also had multiple opportunities within the department to further my skills with summer internships, which looks great on my CV.

If you are interested in medicinal chemistry as a career, you may want to consider a degree with an industrial year. This is where you spend a year out of your degree in the industry so you can increase your real-world skills and try out a specific area of the industry you might be interested in.

If you have any questions about the degree or Lancaster let me know
-Beth (Lancaster Student Ambassador)
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hiya,
I'm currently a third-year chemistry student at Lancaster University. In my experience of studying chemistry, I have overall enjoyed it. There is lots of variation in the modules that you study ranging from electrochemistry, aromatic chemistry, thermodynamics and biomedical imaging. At Lancaster specifically, you have optional modules in third year that can vary depending on the lecturers research fields which is why I am able to study biomedical imaging. When you're researching chemistry degrees, be sure to look for programs that offer modules or specialisations in areas related to medicinal chemistry.
We also spend lots of time in the labs doing practicals which is great for increasing practical skills for industry. In third year, you take on a project where you design your own experiments and do original research which is very different from anything I've ever done before. I have also had multiple opportunities within the department to further my skills with summer internships, which looks great on my CV.
If you are interested in medicinal chemistry as a career, you may want to consider a degree with an industrial year. This is where you spend a year out of your degree in the industry so you can increase your real-world skills and try out a specific area of the industry you might be interested in.
If you have any questions about the degree or Lancaster let me know
-Beth (Lancaster Student Ambassador)

wow thank you so much !!

to find the modules unis offer would it be on the course website ?

is uni chemistry similar to alevel chemistry?

also i have been looking at chem degrees that offer a year abroad as i love to travel, would you know the basic outlines of what id be doing abroad? or does that vary course to course and something id have to look into further?
Original post by leonardenjdeb
wow thank you so much !!
to find the modules unis offer would it be on the course website ?
is uni chemistry similar to alevel chemistry?
also i have been looking at chem degrees that offer a year abroad as i love to travel, would you know the basic outlines of what id be doing abroad? or does that vary course to course and something id have to look into further?

Hiya,

The modules available should be on the website but if you want to find out a comprehensive and up to date list, it may be best to email the department. You do have to keep in mind that some module choices may change by the time you get to uni because they can be based on the lecturers that are in the department at the time.

-Beth (Lancaster Student Ambassador)

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