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uni modules and how they apply to my course

hello i am currently in year 12 and thinking about doing a chemistry degree at uni however i really do not want to limit myself in options for the future as i dont have a specific idea on which branch of chemistry id like to go into

ive read that even though i would do a degree in chemistry i can take modules about different areas like biochem or medicinal chemistry for example, how would taking these modules go towards my degree at uni?

should i look at unis that offer a wide variety of modules and if so what unis do you recommend?
Original post by leonardenjdeb
hello i am currently in year 12 and thinking about doing a chemistry degree at uni however i really do not want to limit myself in options for the future as i dont have a specific idea on which branch of chemistry id like to go into

ive read that even though i would do a degree in chemistry i can take modules about different areas like biochem or medicinal chemistry for example, how would taking these modules go towards my degree at uni?

should i look at unis that offer a wide variety of modules and if so what unis do you recommend?

If a variety is important to you, then it makes to apply to a university which has a wide range of modules - either because their is a lot of breadth within the core modules, or because there is a wide range of optional modules to choose from.

As to "how would taking these modules go towards my degree at uni?", they will count the same as any other module. Whether you gain 30 credits in a core module, 30 credits in optional module A, or 30 credits in optional module B - you've still gained 30 credits.
Original post by DataVenia
If a variety is important to you, then it makes to apply to a university which has a wide range of modules - either because their is a lot of breadth within the core modules, or because there is a wide range of optional modules to choose from.
As to "how would taking these modules go towards my degree at uni?", they will count the same as any other module. Whether you gain 30 credits in a core module, 30 credits in optional module A, or 30 credits in optional module B - you've still gained 30 credits.

thank you so much !
is there a limit to how many modules i can take or is that dependant on the university?
Original post by leonardenjdeb
hello i am currently in year 12 and thinking about doing a chemistry degree at uni however i really do not want to limit myself in options for the future as i dont have a specific idea on which branch of chemistry id like to go into

ive read that even though i would do a degree in chemistry i can take modules about different areas like biochem or medicinal chemistry for example, how would taking these modules go towards my degree at uni?

should i look at unis that offer a wide variety of modules and if so what unis do you recommend?


Usually a degree is made up of multiple modules. You take 120 credits worth of modules per year normally, which can be split into different modules of different "sizes"; multiples of 15 are common, although a few unis have modules in multiples of 20 credits.

Typically at least some of them will be optional, and sometimes your optional modules can be taken outside of your main degree area. Usually you have more optional modules the further into the degree you go - more of your modules will be optional in third or fourth year than in first year for example. This allows you to focus on a particular area of interest more.

That said in chemistry degrees usually you cover the range of chemistry for most of the degree so you have a thorough grounding in all areas. You'll usually cover certain some core aspects of biological chemistry for example in the organic chemistry parts of the course I gather.
Original post by leonardenjdeb
thank you so much !
is there a limit to how many modules i can take or is that dependant on the university?

I have nothing to add to @artful_lounger's excellent response above.
Original post by artful_lounger
Usually a degree is made up of multiple modules. You take 120 credits worth of modules per year normally, which can be split into different modules of different "sizes"; multiples of 15 are common, although a few unis have modules in multiples of 20 credits.
Typically at least some of them will be optional, and sometimes your optional modules can be taken outside of your main degree area. Usually you have more optional modules the further into the degree you go - more of your modules will be optional in third or fourth year than in first year for example. This allows you to focus on a particular area of interest more.
That said in chemistry degrees usually you cover the range of chemistry for most of the degree so you have a thorough grounding in all areas. You'll usually cover certain some core aspects of biological chemistry for example in the organic chemistry parts of the course I gather.

thank you !!
Original post by leonardenjdeb
hello i am currently in year 12 and thinking about doing a chemistry degree at uni however i really do not want to limit myself in options for the future as i dont have a specific idea on which branch of chemistry id like to go into
ive read that even though i would do a degree in chemistry i can take modules about different areas like biochem or medicinal chemistry for example, how would taking these modules go towards my degree at uni?
should i look at unis that offer a wide variety of modules and if so what unis do you recommend?

Hiya,

I'm a third-year chemistry student at Lancaster University so thought I might be able to offer some advice.

Chemistry is a very broad degree with many jobs that you can go into after, so choosing specific modules would not necessarily hinder you after you graduate. At Lancaster, you have to study core modules in areas such as organic synthesis, kinetics, thermodynamics and computational chemistry to give you a wide breadth of knowledge on chemistry as a whole. You may find that when you start studying you find an area that you absolutely love and can tailor you research projects and optional modules to that area. Also, there is also the option of a masters/ PhD in a related science such as biochemisty after your bachelors. In my opinion, a chemistry degree will definitely not limit you.

At Lancaster, in your first year, one-third of your year is made up of modules from another subject. This could be biology if that is what interests you. There are other options though. For example, I studied environmental science. These contributed credits to my chemistry degree but have offered insight into other sciences which is useful. When it comes to choosing optional modules, for chem at Lancaster, they give you a set list you can choose from to ensure that the content meets the requirements of the degree.

If you are interested in studying other areas like biology or biochemistry alongside chemistry, then you might want to consider natural sciences as a degree choice. This is an interdisciplinary degree where you can choose a mixture of pathways from subjects including biology, chemistry, psychology, environmental science, maths, computer science and other subjects. It might offer you some more options in your subjects so you can study all the things that interest you. An interdisciplinary degree is also very valuable to the scientific community after uni.

Hope this helps πŸ™‚
-Beth (Lancaster Student Ambassador)
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador
Hiya,
I'm a third-year chemistry student at Lancaster University so thought I might be able to offer some advice.
Chemistry is a very broad degree with many jobs that you can go into after, so choosing specific modules would not necessarily hinder you after you graduate. At Lancaster, you have to study core modules in areas such as organic synthesis, kinetics, thermodynamics and computational chemistry to give you a wide breadth of knowledge on chemistry as a whole. You may find that when you start studying you find an area that you absolutely love and can tailor you research projects and optional modules to that area. Also, there is also the option of a masters/ PhD in a related science such as biochemisty after your bachelors. In my opinion, a chemistry degree will definitely not limit you.
At Lancaster, in your first year, one-third of your year is made up of modules from another subject. This could be biology if that is what interests you. There are other options though. For example, I studied environmental science. These contributed credits to my chemistry degree but have offered insight into other sciences which is useful. When it comes to choosing optional modules, for chem at Lancaster, they give you a set list you can choose from to ensure that the content meets the requirements of the degree.
If you are interested in studying other areas like biology or biochemistry alongside chemistry, then you might want to consider natural sciences as a degree choice. This is an interdisciplinary degree where you can choose a mixture of pathways from subjects including biology, chemistry, psychology, environmental science, maths, computer science and other subjects. It might offer you some more options in your subjects so you can study all the things that interest you. An interdisciplinary degree is also very valuable to the scientific community after uni.
Hope this helps πŸ™‚
-Beth (Lancaster Student Ambassador)

thank you so much !!

is chemistry at ui similar to alevel in any way?

also i was looking at chem degrees with a year abroad as i love to travel, would you know what that would entail??
Original post by leonardenjdeb
thank you so much !!
is chemistry at ui similar to alevel in any way?
also i was looking at chem degrees with a year abroad as i love to travel, would you know what that would entail??

Hiya,

Chemistry at uni builds on what you have learnt at A-level because it is the only thing you are studying. You really go into a lot of detail about everything that is taught. It is similar to A-level a bit though as you still have compulsory practicals that build on your theoretical learning. However, this learning is normally done via lectures instead of in a classroom. There are also workshops and seminars in which you normally do a question and answer based where you can chat with others and academics about the work. The biggest difference is that the knowledge you learn is applied in exams and coursework in a problem-solving style, as opposed to A-level where you just need to repeat memorised knowledge.

It's so cool that you're looking at years abroad! At Lancaster, the year abroad for chemistry would be in your third year of a four year course. This is a year longer than a bachelors degree but you graduate with a masters in chemistry at the end. The process starts in second year and this is when you get to find out where you can go and choose your preference. You get to pick your modules for your year abroad and someone in the department will help you to pick modules that align with all the core modules at your home university as well as your abroad one. Do you have any specific questions about going a year abroad you'd like answered?

-Beth (Lancaster Student Ambassador)

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