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Unable to do honours in bsc psychology at University of Glasgow

Hi,
I'm currently in my second year of psychology. To be able to honours I need an average of B2. I got a B3 in semester 1 so I need an average of B1 in semester 2. Unfortunately, it isn't going so great, and I now need an A4 in the April exams which are worth 50% of my overall grade. The university has given us options on what we can do if we don't get in such as we apply to another university that accepts a lower grade or we opt for a designated degree or we just hope there are spaces left.

I've looked into the option of a designated degree, and I haven't found much on what I can do with that degree as my initial goal when I pursued psychology was to be a clinical psychologist which I know needs me to complete a master’s and a PhD. I was wondering whether a designated degree would greatly hinder my ability to do that? I find the subject extremely interesting, and I really enjoy it, but I have started considering whether it's right for me as I'm currently really struggling with it. Does anyone else have any experience similar to this?

Another option that I'm considering is starting over with a new degree. Even though this is perceived as significatly harder I was thinking of going into dentistry as the reason, I struggle with psychology is because it's so essay based, and I found it hard to improve as I was used to science-based subjects. My A levels were biology, chemistry, and maths of which I got AAA. I understand that this will probably be way harder due to more content to memorise but I think that maybe I'm stronger at learning sciences rather than something like psychology. I have considered other sciences but the only one that interested me was dentistry as most of my family is in the medical field and there is an overlap between a psychologist and a dentist in aspects of working with patients and helping someone else in a way.

My one fear with this is that I would not do great at the UCAT but if that’s the case maybe I will just end up applying for psychology in a different university as both of these options mean I have to take a gap year and apply.

I'm just so confused and stressed on what I should do. Especially because I've always struggled with English. I wasn't bad at English at GCSE level, but I wasn't good in the end I got a 9 in english language and 8 in english literature but that was due to me not doing the exam during covid time as I feel like if I sat the exam I would have gotten a 7/6 and a 6 so I feel like committing to psychology may actually be a mistake if my ability to effectively write essays is not on par with others. Especially with it being such a competitive field.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Original post by Anonymous
Hi, I'm currently in my second year of psychology. To be able to honours I need an average of B2. I got a B3 in semester 1 so I need an average of B1 in semester 2. Unfortunately, it isn't going so great, and I now need an A4 in the April exams which are worth 50% of my overall grade. The university has given us options on what we can do if we don't get in such as we apply to another university that accepts a lower grade or we opt for a designated degree or we just hope there are spaces left.I've looked into the option of a designated degree, and I haven't found much on what I can do with that degree as my initial goal when I pursued psychology was to be a clinical psychologist which I know needs me to complete a master’s and a PhD. I was wondering whether a designated degree would greatly hinder my ability to do that? I find the subject extremely interesting, and I really enjoy it, but I have started considering whether it's right for me as I'm currently really struggling with it. Does anyone else have any experience similar to this?Another option that I'm considering is starting over with a new degree. Even though this is perceived as significatly harder I was thinking of going into dentistry as the reason, I struggle with psychology is because it's so essay based, and I found it hard to improve as I was used to science-based subjects. My A levels were biology, chemistry, and maths of which I got AAA. I understand that this will probably be way harder due to more content to memorise but I think that maybe I'm stronger at learning sciences rather than something like psychology. I have considered other sciences but the only one that interested me was dentistry as most of my family is in the medical field and there is an overlap between a psychologist and a dentist in aspects of working with patients and helping someone else in a way.My one fear with this is that I would not do great at the UCAT but if that’s the case maybe I will just end up applying for psychology in a different university as both of these options mean I have to take a gap year and apply.I'm just so confused and stressed on what I should do. Especially because I've always struggled with English. I wasn't bad at English at GCSE level, but I wasn't good in the end I got a 9 in english language and 8 in english literature but that was due to me not doing the exam during covid time as I feel like if I sat the exam I would have gotten a 7/6 and a 6 so I feel like committing to psychology may actually be a mistake if my ability to effectively write essays is not on par with others. Especially with it being such a competitive field.Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Hi. This is coming from a Trainee Clinical Psychologist, and from what I’ve seen “gaps” are common for most who have reached this stage, including me. If you do continue to pursue this, I honestly believe these gaps are the opportunities to build the experience you need to get on such courses (e.g. working as a healthcare assistant, third sector etc.), and the perseverance this involves will demonstrate motivation to work in Psychology in applications later on (jobs or post-grad study). Sadly, we don’t often get even AP jobs without some prior experience, which can often be voluntary, so the path to training is rarely quick or clear for people. I came from a science heavy undergrad course as I was also indecisive between psychology and other sciences, but the opportunities that I gained from this angle led me to getting on the course, albeit in a slightly meandering way as I initially wanted to become a chartered Forensic Psychologist. While you don’t need a masters (but a lot of trainees do), people have often completed a psychology conversion masters if need be, so it’s never too late if you do try something else! 🙂
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Reply 2
Original post by Willow160322
Hi. This is coming from a Trainee Clinical Psychologist, and from what I’ve seen “gaps” are common for most who have reached this stage, including me. If you do continue to pursue this, I honestly believe these gaps are the opportunities to build the experience you need to get on such courses (e.g. working as a healthcare assistant, third sector etc.), and the perseverance this involves will demonstrate motivation to work in Psychology in applications later on (jobs or post-grad study). Sadly, we don’t often get even AP jobs without some prior experience, which can often be voluntary, so the path to training is rarely quick or clear for people. I came from a science heavy undergrad course as I was also indecisive between psychology and other sciences, but the opportunities that I gained from this angle led me to getting on the course, albeit in a slightly meandering way as I initially wanted to become a chartered Forensic Psychologist. While you don’t need a masters (but a lot of trainees do), people have often completed a psychology conversion masters if need be, so it’s never too late if you do try something else! 🙂

Thank you so much for your input. I really just have to have a think about all this. Especially because I am in the UK on a student visa so I would have to go back home where there aren't many opportunities for gaining relevant experience unless you have connections. It sucks that psychological studies aren't viewed as highly as it should be. Again, thank you for replying 🙂

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