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Suggest some universities

What universities should i apply to in order to get to med school and accomplish my dream of becoming a neurologist?
A university that offers Medicine.

With the information given, this is about as much as I can recommend without speculation.
Reply 2
University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine
University of Oxford Medical Sciences Division
University College London Medical School
King's College London School of Medicine
University of Edinburgh Medical School
University of Manchester Medical School
University of Glasgow School of Medicine
University of Bristol Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
University of Liverpool Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
Original post by Nicoleon
University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine
University of Oxford Medical Sciences Division
University College London Medical School
King's College London School of Medicine
University of Edinburgh Medical School
University of Manchester Medical School
University of Glasgow School of Medicine
University of Bristol Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry
University of Liverpool Faculty of Health and Life Sciences

thankyou so much
Original post by Anonymous
What universities should i apply to in order to get to med school and accomplish my dream of becoming a neurologist?

Which medical school you go to won't directly affect your future career as a doctor or specialty recruitment - the NHS is the only provider of graduate medical training posts in the UK and takes the GMC's stance that all medical schools are equal - going so far as to blind recruiters from which medical school you graduated from to ensure there is no bias. Your medical school I understand is only checked after you are made an offer to validate that you did indeed graduate from medical school.

Therefore, you need to choose the medical schools you apply to based on a) which you are mostly likely to be shortlisted for interview at and b) which have the course format/location/other facilities available you are looking for.

For a) you need to research the different shortlisting methodologies of different medical schools to understand how they shortlist. Some weight GCSEs heavily; some only have minimum GCSE requirements. Some put a lot of emphasis on the UCAT; some do not. Some score predicted A-level grades, other don't consider them at all. You need to find the ones which you as an individual have the best profile for and apply to those tactically.

For b) you just need to look into the different locations, think about how you'd feel living there, look at where placements are (which are not always nearby but can be across the region!), as well as understand the differences in e.g. case based learning, problem based learning etc, and consider which you might prefer.

Also don't get too hung up on an individual specialty before you go to medical school - you'll still need to learn the full span of medicine in the degree, and then work across the range of medicine as a foundation doctor. For neurology specifically you also can only dual train neurology with internal medicine now so you will be working across the full range of medicine for 3 years in IMT, and then I understand will also have to do work in general internal medicine for the rest of your career. You will therefore have to be doing everything in "general" medicine for the rest of your career, as well as more specialised neurology work! You may also find at some point in the 10 years before you commence higher specialty training in neurology (5 years medical degree, 2 years foundation, 3 years IMT) that a different specialty appeals to you :smile:
Reply 5
Original post by artful_lounger
Which medical school you go to won't directly affect your future career as a doctor or specialty recruitment - the NHS is the only provider of graduate medical training posts in the UK and takes the GMC's stance that all medical schools are equal - going so far as to blind recruiters from which medical school you graduated from to ensure there is no bias. Your medical school I understand is only checked after you are made an offer to validate that you did indeed graduate from medical school.
Therefore, you need to choose the medical schools you apply to based on a) which you are mostly likely to be shortlisted for interview at and b) which have the course format/location/other facilities available you are looking for.
For a) you need to research the different shortlisting methodologies of different medical schools to understand how they shortlist. Some weight GCSEs heavily; some only have minimum GCSE requirements. Some put a lot of emphasis on the UCAT; some do not. Some score predicted A-level grades, other don't consider them at all. You need to find the ones which you as an individual have the best profile for and apply to those tactically.
For b) you just need to look into the different locations, think about how you'd feel living there, look at where placements are (which are not always nearby but can be across the region!), as well as understand the differences in e.g. case based learning, problem based learning etc, and consider which you might prefer.
Also don't get too hung up on an individual specialty before you go to medical school - you'll still need to learn the full span of medicine in the degree, and then work across the range of medicine as a foundation doctor. For neurology specifically you also can only dual train neurology with internal medicine now so you will be working across the full range of medicine for 3 years in IMT, and then I understand will also have to do work in general internal medicine for the rest of your career. You will therefore have to be doing everything in "general" medicine for the rest of your career, as well as more specialised neurology work! You may also find at some point in the 10 years before you commence higher specialty training in neurology (5 years medical degree, 2 years foundation, 3 years IMT) that a different specialty appeals to you :smile:

thankyou this was very helpful
Hello,

I’m a final year medic at UCLan. The way I picked my university was by looking at the structure of the course itself. The most interesting thing about medical school for me was the clinical aspect so I love that my university offered placements from year 1. I also liked the fact that it was a spiral curriculum meaning my knowledge pool gradually increased.

UCLan also had a lot of cool facilities like the anatomage table which was helpful.

As an international student, it was important for me that there were other international medics as well.

At the end of the day, medicine is a heavily regulated course and all the medics have to do the same exam (UKMLA) before they graduate.

Whatever you choose, I hope you will be able to achieve your dream🎉

Best of luck,
Haya -MBBSV
Reply 7
Original post by UCLan Student
Hello,
I’m a final year medic at UCLan. The way I picked my university was by looking at the structure of the course itself. The most interesting thing about medical school for me was the clinical aspect so I love that my university offered placements from year 1. I also liked the fact that it was a spiral curriculum meaning my knowledge pool gradually increased.
UCLan also had a lot of cool facilities like the anatomage table which was helpful.
As an international student, it was important for me that there were other international medics as well.
At the end of the day, medicine is a heavily regulated course and all the medics have to do the same exam (UKMLA) before they graduate.
Whatever you choose, I hope you will be able to achieve your dream🎉
Best of luck,
Haya -MBBSV
Thankyou so much!
Original post by Anonymous
Thankyou so much!
Hey Anon,

It's great to see that Haya's experience as a UCLan student has been helpful to you!

If you do have any questions about any of our medicine courses, please feel free to ask 😊

All the best,
Sarah
Reply 9
Original post by UCLan Ambassador
Hey Anon,
It's great to see that Haya's experience as a UCLan student has been helpful to you!
If you do have any questions about any of our medicine courses, please feel free to ask 😊
All the best,
Sarah

sure thankyou!

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