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GCSE English Lit Romeo and Juliet

Im unsure on how to revise for Romeo and Juliet. Currently I have very little annotations and analysis or key quotes as my teacher has been of no support. What youtubers would you recommend for getting a grade 8 or 9? I'm just quite overwhelmed as different resources such as Mr Salles or Stacey Reay etc. have different analysis or perspectives so Im confused on which I should follow to get the top grades

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Original post by hajar101
Im unsure on how to revise for Romeo and Juliet. Currently I have very little annotations and analysis or key quotes as my teacher has been of no support. What youtubers would you recommend for getting a grade 8 or 9? I'm just quite overwhelmed as different resources such as Mr Salles or Stacey Reay etc. have different analysis or perspectives so Im confused on which I should follow to get the top grades

Mr salles
Reply 2
thank you so much
Original post by hajar101
thank you so much

I got a grade 9 in both lang and lit (AQA) for gcse. therefore, i am doing aqa a level eng lang so if you have any questions or essays u would like me to mark let me know
Original post by revision52
I got a grade 9 in both lang and lit (AQA) for gcse. therefore, i am doing aqa a level eng lang so if you have any questions or essays u would like me to mark let me know

hi, do you still have quotes that you used for your texts? i am doing jane eyre, romeo and juliet, and lord of the flies. if you do, please can you provide them? thanks!!
Original post by unknown19!!
hi, do you still have quotes that you used for your texts? i am doing jane eyre, romeo and juliet, and lord of the flies. if you do, please can you provide them? thanks!!

Sorry, I did Macbeth, Jekyll & Hyde and an inspector calls. Although in year 9 my school does a practice GCSE year in which we do study some GCSE Novels and try exam style questions on them to get a taster of GCSE. So in Year 9, I did AQA' s lord of the flies and romeo and juliet, but in the real gcse i did aic and macbeth. But i do have some resources of romeo and juliet and Also, I have my Lord of the Flies 34 mark answer on the character of Jack for which I got (I don't remember my mark but i think it was a level 6 response) a really good mark and I wrote it in year 9. So i can give that to you if you would like.
Original post by unknown19!!
hi, do you still have quotes that you used for your texts? i am doing jane eyre, romeo and juliet, and lord of the flies. if you do, please can you provide them? thanks!!

My school did lord of the flies for 4 weeks in year 9 as a practice of how a gcse novel is like. So i have a level 6 response to a 34 mark question on it if u would like
If you don't mind, please can I see your Romeo and Juliet resources, and your Lord of the Flies essay please? Thank you so much!
Original post by unknown19!!
If you don't mind, please can I see your Romeo and Juliet resources, and your Lord of the Flies essay please? Thank you so much!

How far does Golding present Jack as a character who changes in Lord of the Flies? (34)
William Golding effectively portrays the changes in the character of Jack through a variety of literary techniques and ambiguous word choices. As the allegorical novel progresses, he gradually reveals an insight into human nature through the character of Jack. Lord of the Flies is a cautionary allegory that sheds light on the fine line between civilised and barbaric tendencies in human nature, more closely seen through the changes in Jack’s human nature.
Golding uses the character of Jack to show that he changes as he descends into savagery throughout the novel. When we first meet Jack, he rejects his given name; “Why should I be Jack? I’m Merridew”. This marks the beginning of Jack’s strong sense of individuality. At the start, we also see Jack’s interaction with Ralph about the Beast when he states “you can feel as if you’re not hunting but being hunted”. This highlights the fact that Jack is still just an ordinary young British boy who is scared of this fear coating the island without any adult supervision. As the story unfolds, we see anarchy represented and Jack’s deep desires and motives on the island. We see Jack’s anger and growing violent tendencies by exclaiming, “Before I could kill it-next time!”. At this point, it seems Jack is ambivalent as he still shows mercy towards the pig but at the same time, Golding’s use of the exclamation mark foreshadows Jack’s inclination towards savagery and brutality, suggesting he is about to change into something civilisation would deny. Golding also wants the reader to think that mankind is inherently evil as Jack displays this through the killing of animals and putting the whole island on fire, which shows Jack has changed as he has no mercy on mother nature and the island. Linking this with the biblical allegory, the Island serves as a perfect paradise, heaven, and could be interpreted as the Garden of Eden. But then, Jack sets the whole island on fire, commits sins and becomes evil. The island and the boys are a microcosm of society as outside the island, the same thing is happening; savage grown-ups killing each other in barbaric wars. This reveals that Jack has changed entirely by the end of the novel into something that mankind is truly evil. Golding wants to put this idea forward as he uses dramatic irony towards the end which is that Jack’s fire got the boys rescued, but the real intention was to hurt Ralph. Golding wants the reader to think that when babies are born they are inherently evil as they’re born with original sin, they’re mischievous, they know how to lie as that comes natural. But what doesn’t come naturally is to be civilised. And Golding has regressed Jack into a baby as in Chapter 12; “Jack was a little boy”.
The first change in Jack that we see is using taboo language towards Piggy as well as physically assaulting him, breaking his glasses, and consistently using the derogatory term ‘fatty’ to address the character. This signals a shift in power dynamics, foreshadowing Jack’s aggressive totalitarianism and fascist leadership style. Moreover, Jack is victimising the weak and the working class by scapegoating and marginalising Piggy as Jack is absolutist, linking with the context behind the time this novel was written in 1954 where the bourgeoisie (upper class) exploited the proletariat (working class) into ‘false class consciousness’. This also means that the demagogues who exploit populist sentiments, like Jack, can easily gain power with an immature, misinformed electorate. Jack is the political allegory in this novel as he parallels to Hitler and the Nazi’s rise to power in the 1930s, as the Nazi Party gained popular support by appealing to the darker emotions in human psychology and fanning popular hatred towards scapegoats like the Jews. Here, Golding may want the reader to think about class divisions and physical appearances, qualities and attributes that can lead to separation between different social groups by using contrasting characters, as Piggy’s asthma, specs, weight and accent puts him into the bottom of dominance ladder even though his ideas may be wise. This shows a change in Jack’s style of leadership as the novel progresses as he becomes more dictatorial and has dominance and authority over the boys on the island as he starts manipulating and controlling them. Golding might have chosen Jack to be dominant as Jack was a slang word for ‘man’ in the middle ages and the fact there are no girls in this novella reflects the patriarchal society of the 1950s.
‘Painted Faces and Long Hair’ serves as a turning point for Jack descending into savagery, as “Jack plans a new face”. The adjective “new” has connotations of good and it shows growth in a person which contradicts what Jack is doing. Here, Jack is painting his face like a barbarian and giving himself over to bloodlust. By masking his face, Jack ultimately becomes more animalistic as animals use camouflage to hunt down their prey, this a step-back because it illustrates the devolution of humans, and a change in Jack’s nature. But, as we establish further on in the novel, the more savage Jack becomes, the more he is able to control the rest of the boys. This is further intensified by Jack’s serious obsession of hunting and thirst for power intensifying as he rejects Ralph’s authority and democratic leadership, which leads him to create a savage tribe that performs rituals, which again portrays a growing division between Jack and some of the other civilised boys as his personality begins to change, which therefore concludes in complete breakdown of order. This builds tension as Jack is in complete antithesis with Ralph who is a democratic leader using the conch, listening to everyone, and Golding using the fire as an extended metaphor for Ralph and the others to escape from the island. As a result of Jack’s leadership, the boys start calling Jack their ‘chief’ which shows complete change in him in order to gain power. Here, Golding might want us to think how far humans could go to gain power over society (the boys), even if it means in deteriorating, regressing behaviour that does not conform to the norms and agreed ways of behaving in society.
‘Shadows and Tall Trees’ gives an interesting insight into the savagery hidden in man’s heart: “a stain in the darkness, a stain that was Jack”. Jack portrays the fatal flaw of humankind that is masked by civilisation and the gradual change in Jack’s attitudes towards others and nature parallels the group’s descent into savagery. The noun ‘stain’ has hard sounds and connotations of something that is unremovable and constant. This links with the fact that all humans have some fault and therefore, Jack is beginning to change into something barbaric which is unremovable and Golding has chosen the character of Jack to represent the side of humans that is truly evil as Jack becomes more savage without laws and norms of society. The use of the indefinite article ‘a’ suggests that Jack isn’t the only cause that has led to the downfall of the boys on the island and presents the idea that Jack was just the spark that was ignited in the boys but they could’ve chosen what to do with it. Also, the imagery in the novel used to describe Jack would be deeply unsettling to English readers - as the dominant ideals that Golding appears to be destroying are attached to Britain’s superior values as a nation. The image of Jack approximates him - a public school student - to the same ‘savages’ that Britain colonised in its empire, which showed what Golding saw as a shared and animalistic humanity that British people shared with other ‘uncivilised’ cultures. This highlights Jack as the main character Golding has chosen to present ideas about change but also all the other boys who join Jack’s tribe have also gone through a change in human nature, implying that Golding wants us to think that without rules and regulations, we all turn into our primitive, animalistic ways.
Another way in which Jack changes is that in the beginning, Jack was first presented as a civilised and an authoritative figure: ‘I am chapter chorister’ and ‘I can sing C sharp’. His innocent, dignified manner and angelic singing is a stark contrast to his later savage-like chanting: “Kill the Beast! Cut his Throat! Spill his Blood!”. The monosyllabic language coupled with the harsh consonant sounds reiterates the lack of emotions Jack has and his merciless intent when he is killing the beast. Jack’s development from saying there was no beast to joining in the chant proves that he has reached the peak of his savagery and has fully changed. Furthermore, the order of the words ‘kill’ then ‘cut’ and ‘spill’ reinforces that Jack wants to do more than what’s necessary and it exacerbates that he has gone beyond the point of barbarity as he enjoyed killing. This highlights a change in Jack’s purpose or aim killing the beast as it was originally based on fear and their need for security. Whereas, now, he does it for the thrill and is sadist. Moving on, the use of the pronoun ‘his’ gives the beast human-like qualities and implies that Jack wants to kill humans which is cannibalistic and sadistic. Alternatively, Jack could have known that it was Simon and he was too caught up in the moment or unwilling to stop because of his stubbornness. Another interpretation is that Jack might’ve known that the Beast was inside them and that the inner conscience was the Beast, which justifies the use of personal pronouns. Perhaps, Jack was trying to remove his past (more civilised) self from existence (as shown earlier when painting his mask) so he can harm others without his guilt stopping him. The repetition of the chant and the use of the power of three are both persuasive techniques which mirror Jack being a temptation to the other boys, and how he has regressed, devolved and changed throughout the novel, especially with the killing of the Beast and the pigs. Golding uses Jack to present the idea that the only thing that stops humans from changing into their primal instincts is the weight of civilization holding us back, and that is what he may want the reader to think when they read this allegorical novel which reflects human nature. This shows a complete change in Jack’s character as has completely devolved from his civilised self.
In conclusion, Golding explored various themes to explore how Jack changes primarily through his interactions with others, his gradual descent into tribalism, the role of political allegory, the island’s social fragmentation and how Jack succumbs into barer instincts which is a reflection of sundry civilizations and societies throughout history. Analysing this allegorical novel and specifically exploring Jack from a psychoanalysis perspective, Jack has a subconscious mind, with animalistic urges, emotions and hidden memories so therefore he is the ‘id’as Freud would call him. And as Golding once said, “man produces evil as a bee produces honey” which reinforces how Jack has found that evil inside him and how he has changed himself and others around him.
Reply 9
the character profiles and themes on pmt are pretty good especially due to the good subject terminology https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/english-revision/gcse-aqa/romeo-and-juliet/
Original post by unknown19!!
If you don't mind, please can I see your Romeo and Juliet resources, and your Lord of the Flies essay please? Thank you so much!

Hey, I can mark any of your lord of the flies or romeo and juliet essays you have written. As i got a grade 9 in both lang and lit (AQA), I am currently studying AQA A-level eng lang, and know how to accurately give marks as I am quite familiar with the markscheme. Feel free to send any essays!
Reply 11
Original post by revision52
Hey, I can mark any of your lord of the flies or romeo and juliet essays you have written. As i got a grade 9 in both lang and lit (AQA), I am currently studying AQA A-level eng lang, and know how to accurately give marks as I am quite familiar with the markscheme. Feel free to send any essays!

Hi. Could you please mark one of my romeo and juliet essays?

Question- How is Juliet presented in the balcony scene and elsewhere across the play?

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare presents Juliet as a determined woman, who is willing to go against the patriarchal society and defy familial honour for the sake of preserving her marriage with Romeo. Initially submissive and obedient, Juliet becomes more independent, challenging her father, Lord Capulet, and her typical role as an Elizabethan woman. Juliet also appears impulsive in her actions, contributing her tragedy at the end of the play. Through Juliet’s character, Shakespeare is inviting the audience to question the morality of a patriarchal society which limits women, such as Juliet, in the play as well as the dangers of hastiness in love and passion. Although Juliet’s impulsiveness contributes to her tragedy, Shakespeare also hints at the inescapable fate which Juliet is controlled by.

At the beginning of the play, Juliet is presented as an exemplary aristocratic daughter, who is obedient to her parents’ wishes. Her first lines in the play establish her as submissive to her parents' will, which is shown in the line: “Madam I am here. What is your will?” Juliet addresses her mother formally using the noun “madam” which shows the immense respect she has for her mother. Juliet here speaks in a formal tone suggesting the formality of their relationship, which would be common in mother-daughter relationships in noble families such as the Capulets. Furthermore, her question “what is your will?” highlights that Juliet is willing to do whatever her mother commands, which was expected of Elizabethan daughters of the time. Elizabethan daughters were expected to follow their parents' wishes, without questioning them, and this is mirrored in Juliet’s character. Juliet’s speech is also short and contained as she is silenced and oppressed by the ideals the patriarchal society imposes on her. Furthermore, in response to her mother’s wishes that she marry Paris, Juliet responds that she will “look to like if looking liking move.” Whilst Juliet seems to be compliant with her mother’s request to marry Paris, Juliet shows early signs of rebellion towards her mother. The alliterative “l” gives Juliet’s language a playful feel and combined with the iambic pentameter, it suggests her control over her language. This could suggest her desire for some form of control, which foreshadows her defiance of the patriarchy later in the play. However, despite this, Juliet does not have the power to do so, as she is limited by her parents’ control and the patriarchal society. Shakespeare could be criticising the burdening restrictions of the patriarchal society, which forces young girls such as Juliet into unhappy marriages, through Juliet’s desire for control. Although Shakespeare presents Juliet as a submissive typical Elizabethan daughter, the audience is aware due to the dramatic irony of the prologue, that Juliet will defy her parents and marry a man not of their choice.

In the extract, Juliet is presented as bold and defiant of her parents’ wishes as well as the typical role of an Elizabethan woman as she is now fully independent. However, Juliet’s impetuosity to do so ultimately leads to her tragedy. During Juliet’s soliloquy, she claims she will “no longer be a Capulet”. Juliet is forgoing her lineage for the sake of Romeo whom she has just met. This declaration not only highlights Juliet as a passionate lover to Romeo, but she is also rejecting any loyalty to her family and openly betraying her parents and the Capulet house. As this is a soliloquy, the audience would know that these are Juliet’s true thoughts, which present her to be a defiant woman. The motif of night when she meets Romeo shows how she is separate from the regular world as she is awake during unusual hours therefore, she does not belong within the feud-driven Verona, suggesting her independence from her parents. Furthermore, Juliet is openly blasphemous, claiming Romeo is “the god of [her idolatry].” The use of paganistic language shows how Juliet has denied God, dedicating her life to Romeo. This would have been recognised by an Elizabethan audience as going against the Great Chain of Being. The Great Chain of Being was the belief that God created the world with a clear hierarchical structure where men were seen as above women, so women were expected to be subordinate to men. As the Great Chain of Being was the foundation of life, Juliet’s refusal of this would only lead to her tragedy, through eternal punishment from God. Perhaps Juliet is the reason for her tragedy, as she challenges God naively. However, Juliet's hastiness to refuse her family and all social constructs for Romeo, whom she has just met, presents her as impulsive and so Juliet’s hamartia is her impulsiveness. Although she claims that Romeo’s rush is “too ill advis’d”, Juliet contrasts this at the end of the scene, agreeing to marry Romeo, further highlighting her impulsive nature. Shakespeare may be warning of the impetuosity of youth and their hastiness in love as this is contributes to Juliet’s inevitable downfall.

Finally, Juliet is presented as although independent, she is overruled by her inescapable fate causing her tragedy. In the extract, Juliet appears fiery and defiant when she claims she will “no longer be a Capulet”. These characteristics present Juliet as a typical Leo in her personality. We are also aware at the start of the play that Juliet is born in “Lammas Eve” which makes us aware that she is a Leo. Elizabethans believed celestial bodies to have an enormous influence over someone’s disposition which explains why Juliet embodies these traits. However, this suggests the immense power of fate from the beginning of the play, which Juliet cannot escape. In Act 3 Scene 5, after Romeo has left for Mantua, Juliet asks fortune to be “fickle” and “send [Romeo] back soon. Juliet is aware of the power which fate has through her pleading for fortune to change its mind and bring Romeo soon. This could be an example of dramatic irony as Romeo does indeed return soon but however, when he does return, he thinks Juliet is dead and poisons himself, fulfilling the prophecy from the prologue of their “death mark’d love.” At the end of the play, Juliet ends her life with her “happy dagger”. Although the adjective “happy” suggests her control over her death as it has positive connotations, the act of death was foreshadowed in the prologue, suggesting her ultimate lack of control in her fate. Shakespeare may be suggesting that although we cannot change our destiny, we should do our best to enjoy the short happiness of life, like Juliet across the play.

In conclusion, Shakespeare criticises the patriarchal control over women in Elizabethan society. Through the construct of Juliet, Shakespeare highlights the dangers of hastiness in passion, as whilst this does not cause Juliet’s death at the end of the play, it certainly exacerbates her fate.
Original post by hajar101
Hi. Could you please mark one of my romeo and juliet essays?
Question- How is Juliet presented in the balcony scene and elsewhere across the play?
In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare presents Juliet as a determined woman, who is willing to go against the patriarchal society and defy familial honour for the sake of preserving her marriage with Romeo. Initially submissive and obedient, Juliet becomes more independent, challenging her father, Lord Capulet, and her typical role as an Elizabethan woman. Juliet also appears impulsive in her actions, contributing her tragedy at the end of the play. Through Juliet’s character, Shakespeare is inviting the audience to question the morality of a patriarchal society which limits women, such as Juliet, in the play as well as the dangers of hastiness in love and passion. Although Juliet’s impulsiveness contributes to her tragedy, Shakespeare also hints at the inescapable fate which Juliet is controlled by.

At the beginning of the play, Juliet is presented as an exemplary aristocratic daughter, who is obedient to her parents’ wishes. Her first lines in the play establish her as submissive to her parents' will, which is shown in the line: “Madam I am here. What is your will?” Juliet addresses her mother formally using the noun “madam” which shows the immense respect she has for her mother. Juliet here speaks in a formal tone suggesting the formality of their relationship, which would be common in mother-daughter relationships in noble families such as the Capulets. Furthermore, her question “what is your will?” highlights that Juliet is willing to do whatever her mother commands, which was expected of Elizabethan daughters of the time. Elizabethan daughters were expected to follow their parents' wishes, without questioning them, and this is mirrored in Juliet’s character. Juliet’s speech is also short and contained as she is silenced and oppressed by the ideals the patriarchal society imposes on her. Furthermore, in response to her mother’s wishes that she marry Paris, Juliet responds that she will “look to like if looking liking move.” Whilst Juliet seems to be compliant with her mother’s request to marry Paris, Juliet shows early signs of rebellion towards her mother. The alliterative “l” gives Juliet’s language a playful feel and combined with the iambic pentameter, it suggests her control over her language. This could suggest her desire for some form of control, which foreshadows her defiance of the patriarchy later in the play. However, despite this, Juliet does not have the power to do so, as she is limited by her parents’ control and the patriarchal society. Shakespeare could be criticising the burdening restrictions of the patriarchal society, which forces young girls such as Juliet into unhappy marriages, through Juliet’s desire for control. Although Shakespeare presents Juliet as a submissive typical Elizabethan daughter, the audience is aware due to the dramatic irony of the prologue, that Juliet will defy her parents and marry a man not of their choice.
In the extract, Juliet is presented as bold and defiant of her parents’ wishes as well as the typical role of an Elizabethan woman as she is now fully independent. However, Juliet’s impetuosity to do so ultimately leads to her tragedy. During Juliet’s soliloquy, she claims she will “no longer be a Capulet”. Juliet is forgoing her lineage for the sake of Romeo whom she has just met. This declaration not only highlights Juliet as a passionate lover to Romeo, but she is also rejecting any loyalty to her family and openly betraying her parents and the Capulet house. As this is a soliloquy, the audience would know that these are Juliet’s true thoughts, which present her to be a defiant woman. The motif of night when she meets Romeo shows how she is separate from the regular world as she is awake during unusual hours therefore, she does not belong within the feud-driven Verona, suggesting her independence from her parents. Furthermore, Juliet is openly blasphemous, claiming Romeo is “the god of [her idolatry].” The use of paganistic language shows how Juliet has denied God, dedicating her life to Romeo. This would have been recognised by an Elizabethan audience as going against the Great Chain of Being. The Great Chain of Being was the belief that God created the world with a clear hierarchical structure where men were seen as above women, so women were expected to be subordinate to men. As the Great Chain of Being was the foundation of life, Juliet’s refusal of this would only lead to her tragedy, through eternal punishment from God. Perhaps Juliet is the reason for her tragedy, as she challenges God naively. However, Juliet's hastiness to refuse her family and all social constructs for Romeo, whom she has just met, presents her as impulsive and so Juliet’s hamartia is her impulsiveness. Although she claims that Romeo’s rush is “too ill advis’d”, Juliet contrasts this at the end of the scene, agreeing to marry Romeo, further highlighting her impulsive nature. Shakespeare may be warning of the impetuosity of youth and their hastiness in love as this is contributes to Juliet’s inevitable downfall.
Finally, Juliet is presented as although independent, she is overruled by her inescapable fate causing her tragedy. In the extract, Juliet appears fiery and defiant when she claims she will “no longer be a Capulet”. These characteristics present Juliet as a typical Leo in her personality. We are also aware at the start of the play that Juliet is born in “Lammas Eve” which makes us aware that she is a Leo. Elizabethans believed celestial bodies to have an enormous influence over someone’s disposition which explains why Juliet embodies these traits. However, this suggests the immense power of fate from the beginning of the play, which Juliet cannot escape. In Act 3 Scene 5, after Romeo has left for Mantua, Juliet asks fortune to be “fickle” and “send [Romeo] back soon. Juliet is aware of the power which fate has through her pleading for fortune to change its mind and bring Romeo soon. This could be an example of dramatic irony as Romeo does indeed return soon but however, when he does return, he thinks Juliet is dead and poisons himself, fulfilling the prophecy from the prologue of their “death mark’d love.” At the end of the play, Juliet ends her life with her “happy dagger”. Although the adjective “happy” suggests her control over her death as it has positive connotations, the act of death was foreshadowed in the prologue, suggesting her ultimate lack of control in her fate. Shakespeare may be suggesting that although we cannot change our destiny, we should do our best to enjoy the short happiness of life, like Juliet across the play.
In conclusion, Shakespeare criticises the patriarchal control over women in Elizabethan society. Through the construct of Juliet, Shakespeare highlights the dangers of hastiness in passion, as whilst this does not cause Juliet’s death at the end of the play, it certainly exacerbates her fate.

Hey,
WWW -Strong use of textual evidence and historical context to support your analysis. Insightful exploration of Juliet's character development and thematic concerns within the play.

EBI - Incorporate a more balanced view of Juliet's character by exploring moments of reflection or prudence. Ensure to directly link observations to specific scenes or moments in the play for a more grounded analysis.

This is a level 5 response, I would award 23 marks
Reply 13
Original post by revision52
Hey,
WWW -Strong use of textual evidence and historical context to support your analysis. Insightful exploration of Juliet's character development and thematic concerns within the play.
EBI - Incorporate a more balanced view of Juliet's character by exploring moments of reflection or prudence. Ensure to directly link observations to specific scenes or moments in the play for a more grounded analysis.
This is a level 5 response, I would award 23 marks

Thank you so much for the feedback. I know this sounds dumb but what do you mean by moments of reflection or prudence? Once again thank you for the feedback :smile:
Original post by hajar101
Thank you so much for the feedback. I know this sounds dumb but what do you mean by moments of reflection or prudence? Once again thank you for the feedback :smile:

Think about her love for romeo, when she has conflicting ideas maybe (by using oxymorons) , does she doubt her love for him, does she love him in the beginning till the end, when she is confused after the death of her brother, compare that with the antithesis of Romeo , is it infatuation, unreciprocated love etc. He values her (she is heavenly for him - religious imagery)
Reply 15
Original post by revision52
Think about her love for romeo, when she has conflicting ideas maybe (by using oxymorons) , does she doubt her love for him, does she love him in the beginning till the end, when she is confused after the death of her brother, compare that with the antithesis of Romeo , is it infatuation, unreciprocated love etc. He values her (she is heavenly for him - religious imagery)

thank youu that makes more sense now :smile:
Original post by revision52
Sorry, I did Macbeth, Jekyll & Hyde and an inspector calls. Although in year 9 my school does a practice GCSE year in which we do study some GCSE Novels and try exam style questions on them to get a taster of GCSE. So in Year 9, I did AQA' s lord of the flies and romeo and juliet, but in the real gcse i did aic and macbeth. But i do have some resources of romeo and juliet and Also, I have my Lord of the Flies 34 mark answer on the character of Jack for which I got (I don't remember my mark but i think it was a level 6 response) a really good mark and I wrote it in year 9. So i can give that to you if you would like.

Hey have y still got Jekyll and Hyde notes ?
Original post by Uhhuhhhhhhhb
Hey have y still got Jekyll and Hyde notes ?

Sorry no. But physics and maths tutor is good, bbc bitesize, youtube videos
Original post by revision52
Hey, I can mark any of your lord of the flies or romeo and juliet essays you have written. As i got a grade 9 in both lang and lit (AQA), I am currently studying AQA A-level eng lang, and know how to accurately give marks as I am quite familiar with the markscheme. Feel free to send any essays!

Thank you so much, I really appreciate the help!
Reply 19
Original post by revision52
Hey,
WWW -Strong use of textual evidence and historical context to support your analysis. Insightful exploration of Juliet's character development and thematic concerns within the play.
EBI - Incorporate a more balanced view of Juliet's character by exploring moments of reflection or prudence. Ensure to directly link observations to specific scenes or moments in the play for a more grounded analysis.
This is a level 5 response, I would award 23 marks

Hii. Im really sorry to bother you but would it be fine if you could mark another one of my essays

The question is: In Romeo and Juliet, how does Shakespeare presents parental relationships in Act 3 Scene 5 and elsewhere in the play?

In Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare presents parental relationships as distant and lacking empathy, as Juliet refers to Lady Capulet as “madam”. Shakespeare also criticises the distant and formal relationships within noble families during the Elizabethan era through the constructs of the Capulet and Montague families. Shakespeare also suggests that a lack of support in relationships will only lead to the downfall of the nobility’s children, as their children may seek paternal love elsewhere, taking advice, which may be driven by self-interest, from other figures as Juliet does with the Nurse, and Romeo with the Friar.
Towards the beginning of the play, parental relationships within the Capulet and Montague families appear distant and unloving. We are first introduced to the relationship between Lord and Lady Montague, who appear distant to Romeo. Lady Montague interrogates Benvolio, asking “where is Romeo? Saw you him today?”. The repeated questions, although on the surface present Lord and Lady Montague as caring of Romeo through the repetition of their concern, perhaps signalling an urgency to know of Romeo’s whereabouts, it appears that they embody a Laissez-faire style of parenting, only asking of his whereabouts through Benvolio. Lord Montague also takes a passive approach, saying they would “willingly give cure as know.” The quick contrast within from repeated questions, to simply treating Romeo’s isolation as a disease, which is impossible to find the cure for, highlights their lack of an active role in a relationship. Contrastingly, the Capulet parents appear to have a firmer control over Juliet’s life at the beginning of the play. Capulet, in Act 1 Scene 2, discusses Paris’ intentions to wed Juliet, without Juliet’s presence on stage, showing the epitome of control he has over Juliet, as marriage is an essential decision within one’s life. Although Capulet encourages Paris to wait two mare summers until she is “ripe to be a bride,” the adjective ripe has connotations of a crop or fruit which is to be harvested for sale. Here, Capulet is alluding to Juliet’s virginity, which he wishes to harvest and sell at the right time to a noble suitor, such as Paris. Capulet also states Juliet is the hopeful “lady of [his] earth.” Although this may invoke sympathy within the audience, as we are aware all of Capulet’s children have died, the personal pronoun “my” presents Juliet as Capulet’s possession. Perhaps, Juliet’s virginity and the ability to sell it for the sake of advancing socially is Capulet’s “earth” as it his final chance to elevate his social class, due to the deaths of his children. Juliet has also not yet turned “fourteen”. Although some may suggest this was the typical age of marriage in the Elizabethan era, the typical age for marriage was twenty-one for women, which would horrify an audience of the Italian tradition of marrying girls at such a young age. Shakespeare may be criticising the extremes of parenting as at the one extreme, the Montagues are distant and ask little of Romeo, putting in no effort to understand the reason behind his sadness, whilst at the other is the power-hungry Capulet, controlling Juliet’s decisions of marriage. This may be due to the nature of the patriarchal society, as women were viewed as commodities by their fathers, so they needed to be controlled to ensure their virginities remained intact. On the other hand, due to the patriarchy. The Montagues do not feel the need to control Romeo, as there was no emphasis on a male remaining virgin, and so they parent him in a much more distant way. Shakespeare may be criticising the patriarchal society and its hypocritical nature of women remaining sexually pure whereas this is not the case for males, as this affects the way Capulet parents Juliet compared to the relaxed and distant parenting of Romeo.

Shakespeare also suggests the dangers of parents not being the main providers of maternal and paternal support, as this leads both Romeo and Juliet to trust individuals who take advantage of them. In Act 2 Scene 3, the Friar appears to take a paternal role, as Romeo calls him “father.” Upon hearing of Romeo’s plans to marry Juliet, the Friar replies that this “alliance” may turn their household’s rancour to pure “love”. The noun “alliance” connotes to a transactional marriage, or a political alliance between two powerful families as is the case here. The Friar also is aware that this “may” be successful or not. This suggests the Friar is aware of the risks, yet is doing this for the sake of resolving the feud, rather than prioritising Romeo and Juliet’s love. This presents the Friar as naiive and self-interested, as he would most likely gain influence and praise for resolving the “ancient grudge”. Furthermore, the half-rhyme in “prove...love” reinforces how flawed the Friar’s view is: this decision to marry the couple is a catalyst for the tragedy. The Friar also speaks mainly in rhyming couplets during this scene as he says young men’s love “lies” not truly in their hearts but in their “eyes” which gives a proverb like feel, and the rhyming couplets suggest a balance and wisdom, with a lack of bias. However, as this is the only half-rhyme within this scene, it suggests the Friar is more biased towards his own agenda to solve this feud, and so his hamartia is his self-interest and naiivety to believe he solely can resolve this “ancient grudge”. Shakespeare may be warning his noble Elizabethan audience of the dangers of allowing other individuals to take a parental role, as they often take advantage of their children for self-interest, as Romeo marries Juliet shortly after this scene. This is also mirrored in the Nurse’s treatment of Juliet. Whilst in her first presentation, the Nurse appears compassionate, with the terms “lamb” and “ladybird” said in an endearing tone, highlighting her love for Juliet, the Nurse appears self-interested in Act 3 Scene 5, encouraging Juliet to commit bigamy and to marry Paris. The Nurse attempts to convince Juliet Paris is a “dishclout” to Romeo. The Nurse is aware going against Capulet will result in her being sacked and so, aware of her maternal value in Juliet’s life, she attempts to convince her to commit bigamy for the sake of maintaining her position as a nanny. The Nurse uses her relationship with Juliet for her own self-interest, which again reminds an Elizabethan audience that individuals, such as the Nurse and the Friar, will not remain loyal to the children of noble families in the face of self-interest. Thus, Shakespeare is warning noble families of allowing external figure to take on this parental role.
Finally, in the extract, Shakespeare highlights that perceiving children as a commodity and not respecting their decisions leads to their deaths. In the extract, Juliet defies her father, refusing to marry Paris. Capulet claims he will “drag” her on a “hurdle”. The monosyllabic “drag” with the harsh plosive of “d” and the harsh vowel in “drag” mirror the violence and anger in his manner. Dragging on a hurdle was also a typical punishment for traitors. Just as a traitor would be torture and then executed, Capulet intends to torture Juliet with his insults. Capulet sees Juliet as “carrion”, dead meat, because until she marries, he gets nothing in exchange for her. She is “baggage” because not only does this metaphor objectify her as Capulet’s property, but her worth is only measured in what she can bring to him through marriage as without this she is simply occupying space within the Capulet household. These metaphors point to her role in the patriarchal marriage which is to enrich her parents through an advantageous alliance.
Furthermore, Capulet views his daughter as entirely bred for reproduction. The metaphor of “fine joints” comes from pottery, as he wants to mould her entirely to his and Paris’ desires. The “fine joints” could also be a reference to the sexual organs of Juliet, centring his “earth” around her sexual attractiveness to Paris. This is reinforced by the imperative of “graze where you will”. “Graze” marks her out as a farm animal, which emphasises her patriarchal duty to breed. Upon Juliet’s ‘death’, Capulet replies that death has “deflowered” Juliet. Capulet personifies death as a lover who has taken Juliet’s virginity, before Paris could do so. Even whilst grieving Juliet, this grief disgusts the audience through the high level of sexual language. Shakespeare suggests that Juliet’s suicide at the end of the play was necessary. Had she continued to live, she would be forced to be wedded to another wealthy suitor or worse, in the control of her father, whose threats will come into action. At the end of the play, Capulet agrees to resolve the peace by giving Montague his daughter’s “jointure” which alludes to her dowry which he would pay. Even in grief, Capulet still talks about his daughter in financial terms. Shakespeare is inviting the audience to criticise this patriarchal view of children, especially girls, as objects of financial elevation, as this only restricts young women in an Elizabethan society,
In conclusion, Shakespeare highlights the dangers of distant and unloving parental relationships as these lead children to seek solace in other individuals who easily take advatantadge of them. More importantly, Shakespeare highlights the unsolved tragedy of the play- viewing young girls of noble families as commodities and placing a market value on their virginity. Through the semantic field of money in “golden statue” and “jointure” at the end of the play, Shakespeare suggests Capulet is still not aware his daughter’s tragedy is caused by his patriarchal view, and so encourages the Elizabethan audience to abandon these views to prevent the tragedy of their own children.

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