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What Gcse grades are likely to be acceptable for oxford

I am in year 11 about to do my gcses and i am quite confident that my grades will end up on the lines of 9,9,9,9,9,8,8,8,7,7,6.
Im looking to study law further down the line at university. With these grades should i be looking into universities like oxford? Will these hold me back or be fine?
Reply 1
Hi!

I have done some digging into the University of Oxford and how they assess you for getting in (will link both for you) and what they do is assess your grades for GCSE's (which already look amazing btw), your attainment for getting such GCSE's and your grades and performance when you attend college.

When applying for your chosen course which I am assuming would be Law (Jurisprudence) when applying for Oxford, you would need to get AAA in your A-Levels. There seems to be no recommended subject to get into the course (other than getting grades AAA) but a course which involves essay writing seems necessary.

I hope this helps.

links:
https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/applying-to-oxford/decisions/contextual-data
https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/course-listing/law-jurisprudence
Original post by Evanalex
I am in year 11 about to do my gcses and i am quite confident that my grades will end up on the lines of 9,9,9,9,9,8,8,8,7,7,6.
Im looking to study law further down the line at university. With these grades should i be looking into universities like oxford? Will these hold me back or be fine?

these will 100% be fine
Reply 3
Original post by loopy lulu
these will 100% be fine


Thank you
Reply 4
Original post by catnova
Hi!
I have done some digging into the University of Oxford and how they assess you for getting in (will link both for you) and what they do is assess your grades for GCSE's (which already look amazing btw), your attainment for getting such GCSE's and your grades and performance when you attend college.
When applying for your chosen course which I am assuming would be Law (Jurisprudence) when applying for Oxford, you would need to get AAA in your A-Levels. There seems to be no recommended subject to get into the course (other than getting grades AAA) but a course which involves essay writing seems necessary.
I hope this helps.
links:
https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/applying-to-oxford/decisions/contextual-data
https://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/course-listing/law-jurisprudence


Thank you, very useful
hi, I had a talk specifically from Oxford admission offers and they said they look at how good your GCSEs are for your school. for example if the average GCSE grades in your school are like 5/6s they would view those grades very highly but if the average grades were 9/8s they still would thinks your gcse grades are good but not as amazing as someone who got all 9s at a school whose underperforming. you should still consider Oxford as most people with your grades do ended up applying to them anyways.
Original post by Anonymous
hi, I had a talk specifically from Oxford admission offers and they said they look at how good your GCSEs are for your school. for example if the average GCSE grades in your school are like 5/6s they would view those grades very highly but if the average grades were 9/8s they still would thinks your gcse grades are good but not as amazing as someone who got all 9s at a school whose underperforming. you should still consider Oxford as most people with your grades do ended up applying to them anyways.


Oxford admissions officers**
Reply 7
Original post by Anonymous
hi, I had a talk specifically from Oxford admission offers and they said they look at how good your GCSEs are for your school. for example if the average GCSE grades in your school are like 5/6s they would view those grades very highly but if the average grades were 9/8s they still would thinks your gcse grades are good but not as amazing as someone who got all 9s at a school whose underperforming. you should still consider Oxford as most people with your grades do ended up applying to them anyways.


Ok thank you, do you think that i can make up for this however as i have a really strong extra/super curricular activities
Original post by Evanalex
Ok thank you, do you think that i can make up for this however as i have a really strong extra/super curricular activities


Yes, it’s all about how you write about them in your personal statement to show you’re interested in the course!
Reply 9
Original post by Anonymous
Yes, it’s all about how you write about them in your personal statement to show you’re interested in the course!


Thank you so much for this advice, really appreciate it
Original post by Evanalex
Thank you so much for this advice, really appreciate it


No problem!
OP, those GCSE grades would put you in contention, but please note the following.

Oxford tutors are not interested in the extra-curricular activities undertaken by applicants. They may be interested in super-curricular activities that are relevant to the subject applied for.

But the main focus is on academic potential. GCSEs are looked at, but the tutors are more interested in

predicted or actual grades at A level or IB;

a well written personal statement which communicates a commitment to the subject applied for;

a glowing reference from a teacher which identifies a candidate as academically outstanding;

a strong performance in any subject-specific aptitude test (in the case of law, the LNAT);

strong performance under pressure at interview. An Oxford interview is not unlike an Oxford tutorial - a challenging discussion about something relevant to the subject applied for.


The tutors are looking for candidates who appear to be committed to their subjects, and who appear likely to do well in the fairly intense academic environment of Oxford.

The notion that Oxford is all work and no play is a myth. There is plenty of time for student fun. But make no mistake about the workload: Oxford undergraduates are pushed hard from the outset, and the tutors expect high standards.

Studying at Oxford can (not must) set a person up well for the world of work. Those who seek and obtain interesting and/or well paid jobs may find that those jobs are more demanding and stressful than any amount of university stress. I experienced stress for the first time in my life when preparing for my final history exams at Oxford, but I got through OK, and I later found that the exam stress was nothing compared to the stress of being a commercial litigator (which is my job).

Aim high, but please don't fixate on Oxford. Most people who apply don't get in. There are many good universities apart from Oxford, and not getting in doesn't make a person a failure.

Work hard, have fun, don't burn out, good luck!
(edited 1 month ago)
PS: Pick your best three subjects for A levels or IB higher level. There is no need to do more than three A levels (ignore anyone here who suggests that four A levels are needed for Oxford law applications). I suggest that you don't do A level law - it confers no advantage and is, I think, a waste of an A level. Pick three rigorous academic subjects - it does not matter which. Do what you do best.

Note also that about half of the practising barristers and solicitors in the UK have degrees in subjects other than law. If you do a non-law degree, you can study law for a year afterwards and then train as a lawyer.

The study of law is worthy in its own right, whether or not the student goes on to be a lawyer, but law is not for everyone. Some find it a bit dry and detailed.

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