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What can I do with these A levels?

I'm taking Psychology, English Literature, Art and History for my AS levels, probably dropping history for A level, just wondering what university courses/jobs I could get? I am leaning into child psychology/criminology but still not completely sure what I could do after getting said degrees, teaching preschool is also my backup but I am more interested in criminology. I plan on studying in Ireland or the UK... any help appreciated!
Architecture/ design related stuff seems to suit you. You seem REALLY artistic*
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 2
Well if you're interested in criminology then law maybe?

Otherwise topical degrees for the changing world - global enviromental degress? Employment of environmental scientists and specialists is projected to grow in the future.

Other options Business Management/Econs (some require GCSE maths - check individual courses)
Reply 3
Well if you're interested in criminology then law maybe?

Otherwise topical degrees for the changing world - global enviromental degress? Employment of environmental scientists and specialists is projected to grow in the future.

Other options Business Management/Econs (some require GCSE maths - check individual courses)
Reply 4
Original post by WordsFiddle
Architecture/ design related stuff seems to suit you. You seem REALLY artistic*


honestly that was one of my top choices since I was a kid but just worried about burnout, etc!!so I thought something like criminology would be fun as I am genuinely interested in that kinda stuff.
Original post by chloeg08
I'm taking Psychology, English Literature, Art and History for my AS levels, probably dropping history for A level, just wondering what university courses/jobs I could get? I am leaning into child psychology/criminology but still not completely sure what I could do after getting said degrees, teaching preschool is also my backup but I am more interested in criminology. I plan on studying in Ireland or the UK... any help appreciated!

You can think deep thoughts about employment!

I'm only joking, criminology is not really a thing in the UK outside of academia anyhoo. Child psychology isn't either in itself neither are "course qualifying", there are obviously practitioners and psychologists working exclusively with children that could say they are child psychologists but this isn't actually a title (protected) the qualifications are different and wider reaching.

I think, you asked...that you should decide what you want to do at uni then you can decide which a levels matter the most.
If you wanted to work with children, offenders or offending children, a clinical psychologist could do all of this. But there are other ways in too but nearly all are not post undergraduate unless you are in the right place and right time
Original post by chloeg08
honestly that was one of my top choices since I was a kid but just worried about burnout, etc!!so I thought something like criminology would be fun as I am genuinely interested in that kinda stuff.

I have an impression that nothing is fun while you're in uni. You should think about what happens after uni. Will you regret studying architecture once into professional life? Will you still prefer criminology?
Reply 7
Original post by chloeg08
I'm taking Psychology, English Literature, Art and History for my AS levels, probably dropping history for A level, just wondering what university courses/jobs I could get? I am leaning into child psychology/criminology but still not completely sure what I could do after getting said degrees, teaching preschool is also my backup but I am more interested in criminology. I plan on studying in Ireland or the UK... any help appreciated!

If you're interested in developmental psychology, you could always look to study a degree in psychology with education. This could provide a strong foundation for becoming an educational or clinical psychologist, which would require further training and lots of experience, however this seems like a career that may be suited to you. Becoming an educational psychologist would allow you to work in educational settings and primarily with young people. Clinical psychologists in specialist adolescent units, such as inpatient CAHMS wards, also get to work with young people. Similarly, if you are interested in criminology, you could opt for a straight psychology degree and focus more on forensic psychology modules. Again, you'll have to complete further training after your undergrad, but becoming a forensic psychologist will allow you to work with youth offenders if that's something you are interested in. If you want to study psychology, I would suggest having a BPS accredited degree, as this will make you eligible for graduate membership and allow you to pursue further study without needing another accredited degree. The route to becoming a psychologist in the UK, whether forensic, educational or clinical, usually takes several years and you will need experience before gaining a place on an approved doctorate programme, which is something you should consider. For now, I wouldn't worry too much about careers as psychology is a very flexible degree and has transferable skills that can be used across a wide range of sectors. Psychology graduates often find themselves in jobs to do with mental health, HMP services, business management and consulting, law and marketing. It's a very employable degree for these reasons.

I think you should focus more on what you actually want to study for three years. Like I said, psychology can be used in a variety of fields, but if you find yourself focused on particular areas, you might want to study something that is more specialised. I know someone who is studying criminology and she really enjoys it. I would look into firstly, universities that offer the course and secondly, the modules listed in said course. As well as psychology and criminology, you might want to look into early years education and primary teaching degrees, since you seem interested in working with young people. I'm not sure about regulations in Ireland so you would need to do some research in that area, as the UK and Ireland will have different regulations on their degrees. When researching degrees, you should make sure that you meet all their GCSE requirements and have predicted A level grades in their typical range. You could also go into law if criminology is something you enjoy, but you should be aware that the majority of content covered in law degrees will not be focused on criminal law, unless you select optional modules based in this. There are joint honours law and criminology degrees, but I would only suggest studying law if you have an interest in law as a whole, not just criminal law, as it is an extremely competitive field to go into and you may not enjoy studying law at undergrad. If you change your mind about what you want to do during your degree, be aware that there are both psychology and law conversion degrees available postgrad, as well as PGCEs (postgraduate certificate in education) that you can study to switch into a new field. I think the best thing to do is to attend open days and hear more about the subjects at universities that you're interested in.

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