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Fired in second Shift autism

Hey I recently got my first job at Dominos and I was fired on my second shift. I had one training shift where I went in for an hour then I had a proper shift on the Saturday which is the busiest day. Shortly after I got told that I'm not going to be kept on the team which kind of sucks as I'm pretty sure it's because I wasn't fast enough, even though I wasn't even told how to make half the pizzas I was told I'd learn on the job but when I asked people everyone was too busy to help and then they'd end up just doing it rather than saying what to do. I was trying but I think it just takes longer for me to understand everything and learn as I'm not too good at just interpreting what instructions say. Does anyone know what kind of jobs are good for autistic people as it just felt like things weren't explained to me enough and nobody wanted to help when I asked
Reply 1
I don't write on my job applications that I'm autistic which probably doesn't help as I don't want to be labeled or viewed differently by others. It took a while just to even get this job which makes it worse
Original post by Jakehaken
Hey I recently got my first job at Dominos and I was fired on my second shift. I had one training shift where I went in for an hour then I had a proper shift on the Saturday which is the busiest day. Shortly after I got told that I'm not going to be kept on the team which kind of sucks as I'm pretty sure it's because I wasn't fast enough, even though I wasn't even told how to make half the pizzas I was told I'd learn on the job but when I asked people everyone was too busy to help and then they'd end up just doing it rather than saying what to do. I was trying but I think it just takes longer for me to understand everything and learn as I'm not too good at just interpreting what instructions say. Does anyone know what kind of jobs are good for autistic people as it just felt like things weren't explained to me enough and nobody wanted to help when I asked


Id have told them that you were autistic. Id deffo mention it on future job applications.
If people have disabilities, then employers have to make reasonable adjustments. And they can be done for discrimination if you are treated unfairly.
Would it be worth speaking to dominoes and explaining the situation? They may not take you back (and depending on what you thought of the job you may not want to go back) but it may be worth a try.
How about in shops/supermarkets? There will be less pressure to be quick at stuff than in places like dominoes. And things like shelf stacking take less learning anyway.
Original post by Emma:-)
Id have told them that you were autistic. Id deffo mention it on future job applications.
If people have disabilities, then employers have to make reasonable adjustments. And they can be done for discrimination if you are treated unfairly.
Would it be worth speaking to dominoes and explaining the situation? They may not take you back (and depending on what you thought of the job you may not want to go back) but it may be worth a try.
How about in shops/supermarkets? There will be less pressure to be quick at stuff than in places like dominoes. And things like shelf stacking take less learning anyway.
Yeah I think people should be letting future employers know that they have a disability as they have a legal right to make any adjustments if they employ them.

Supermarket will be supportive of disabled people or those who have a disability that effects their ability to do the job roles - they work with the disability act of 2010 .

The OP could take dominos to tribunal for being dismissed because of them not obeying the disability act.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by Tracey_W
The OP could take dominos to tribunal for being dismissed because of them not obeying the disability act.


First of all, it's the Equality Act. The Disability Discrimination Act was repealed in 2010.

Second of all, no, the OP cannot take Dominoes to an Employment Tribunal. Both the duty to make reasonable adjustments under section 20 the Equality Act 2010 and the duty not to discriminate due to something arising from the employee's disability under section 15 of the Equality Act 2010 (which is the claim you'd normally make in the event of dismissal) require the employer to have knowledge of the employee's disability. Here the OP has said that they did not make Dominoes aware that they are autistic, so that closes the door on any claim I'm afraid.

Going forwards, though, I absolutely agree that the OP should be making prospective employers aware that they are autistic. There will certainly be occasions when that disadvantages the OP with, shall we say, less enlightened employers, but certainly with bigger companies the OP will put themselves in a better position to receive the adjustments that they need to properly integrate into the workplace. It obviously also affords them greater protection under the Equality Act once the prospective employer knows, but rather than thinking about claims I'd consider the bigger advantage to simply be that it makes it more likely that the OP will receive the adjustments and support they need to do the job properly and contribute as they would want to. It's worth letting them know solely for that reason in my view.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by Tracey_W
Yeah I think people should be letting future employers know that they have a disability as they have a legal right to make any adjustments if they employ them.

Supermarket will be supportive of disabled people or those who have a disability that effects their ability to do the job roles - they work with the disability act of 2010 .

The OP could take dominos to tribunal for being dismissed because of them not obeying the disability act.


Could they still do that even though dominoes werent told (so didnt know) about the autism?
Obviously in normal circumstances, id say yes they are in the wrong and could be taken to a tribunal. But could they still be taken to a tribunal if they didnt know?
Reply 6
Original post by Emma:-)
Id have told them that you were autistic. Id deffo mention it on future job applications.
If people have disabilities, then employers have to make reasonable adjustments. And they can be done for discrimination if you are treated unfairly.
Would it be worth speaking to dominoes and explaining the situation? They may not take you back (and depending on what you thought of the job you may not want to go back) but it may be worth a try.
How about in shops/supermarkets? There will be less pressure to be quick at stuff than in places like dominoes. And things like shelf stacking take less learning anyway.

The reason I didn't put it down is I don't usually tell people as I don't like using it as an excuse. I've tried to apply for supermarkets without writing down that I have autism but I don't get a response as I don't have work experience. I saw some shops say that if you have something like that you're guaranteed an interview if you pass the pre-screening. I was worried about going into an interview only because they had to do it not because I was qualified for the actual job. Do you know how likely it is they'd tell other employees too as I'd prefer if it wasn't known tbh
Original post by Jakehaken
The reason I didn't put it down is I don't usually tell people as I don't like using it as an excuse. I've tried to apply for supermarkets without writing down that I have autism but I don't get a response as I don't have work experience. I saw some shops say that if you have something like that you're guaranteed an interview if you pass the pre-screening. I was worried about going into an interview only because they had to do it not because I was qualified for the actual job. Do you know how likely it is they'd tell other employees too as I'd prefer if it wasn't known tbh

Yeah I'd put it down, it's not using it as an excuse, it's letting them know so they can help you out.
I doubt they would go round telling everyone you have autism. Obviously they would have to tell certain people that need to know (i.e. managers /supervisors) but I doubt they would go round telling everyone. If you asked them to only tell the people that actually need to know, then I'm sure they would be ok with that.
Original post by Jakehaken
The reason I didn't put it down is I don't usually tell people as I don't like using it as an excuse. I've tried to apply for supermarkets without writing down that I have autism but I don't get a response as I don't have work experience. I saw some shops say that if you have something like that you're guaranteed an interview if you pass the pre-screening. I was worried about going into an interview only because they had to do it not because I was qualified for the actual job. Do you know how likely it is they'd tell other employees too as I'd prefer if it wasn't known tbh

Then apply without saying and tell the HR people or line-manager on day 1 in the job or whenever you think you need to because you need an adjustment.

And no, it's a health condition, they can only tell people if they can show there is a valid business reason, so for example, if you tell your manager, they will probably tell HR so it is on your record. but they can't tell colleagues who work with you.
Original post by Emma:-)
Could they still do that even though dominoes werent told (so didnt know) about the autism?
Obviously in normal circumstances, id say yes they are in the wrong and could be taken to a tribunal. But could they still be taken to a tribunal if they didnt know?

The person would have to prove it was dominoes fault if they took them to a tribunal ( even if they did know about it)

Not putting it down is a silly mistake by Jakenhaken as you need to let them know about any conditions that affects you at work. That's the reason there's a equality act so people can get the necessary help required to work from there employers.
Original post by Tracey_W
The person would have to prove it was dominoes fault if they took them to a tribunal ( even if they did know about it)
Not putting it down is a silly mistake by Jakenhaken as you need to let them know about any conditions that affects you at work. That's the reason there's a equality act so people can get the necessary help required to work from there employers.

This isn’t right either. In the event of a section 15 claim brought following dismissal it’s on the employee to prove that the unfavourable treatment was due to something arising from their disability, but thereafter the burden shifts to the employer to prove the statutory defence, otherwise the dismissal will be discriminatory.

I don’t know what sort of background or experience you have in employment law, but just these two posts I’ve read show really basic errors. There are people who will read threads like these who are in need of advice and cannot distinguish between those who know what they are talking about and those who do not. If you’re going to give advice on these sorts of things or hold yourself out as an authority on them, you really do need to make sure that what you’re saying is accurate.
Reply 11
Hi there. I would mention it in your application and for any reasonable adjustments explain any processing difficulties etc you have and how they could assist you.

You could ask that only those who need to know such as a Line Manager for example should be informed. Companies take confidentiality very seriously and it is highly unlikely that anyone else would find out unless of course you wanted to tell them.

Having autism doesn't define you but if you have difficulties with certain things and need adjustments just ask for them otherwise you are going to be at a disadvantage and that's simply not fair. There are also many companies these days who want diversity in the workplace and you could actually be missing out on opportunities by not mentioning it.

Good luck!
Reply 12
Would you do a customer service job? I recently got a customer service job taking inbound calls which I don’t mind because it’s easy and I work from home and choose my own hours. I’ll be working in between term times too. Idk if they’re still hiring but look on their website it’s called remflexgroup.co.uk.
Reply 13
Would you do customer service job?I recently got a customer service job taking inbound calls which I don’t mind because it’s easy and I work from home and choose my own hours. I’ll be working in between term times too. Idk if they’re still hiring but look on their website it’s called remflexgroup.co.uk.
Original post by Jakehaken
Hey I recently got my first job at Dominos and I was fired on my second shift. I had one training shift where I went in for an hour then I had a proper shift on the Saturday which is the busiest day. Shortly after I got told that I'm not going to be kept on the team which kind of sucks as I'm pretty sure it's because I wasn't fast enough, even though I wasn't even told how to make half the pizzas I was told I'd learn on the job but when I asked people everyone was too busy to help and then they'd end up just doing it rather than saying what to do. I was trying but I think it just takes longer for me to understand everything and learn as I'm not too good at just interpreting what instructions say. Does anyone know what kind of jobs are good for autistic people as it just felt like things weren't explained to me enough and nobody wanted to help when I asked

Hey, sorry that happened to you on your first job! It may be the case that your Saturday shift was still technically a training/ trial shift. If you didn't sign any work contract with them yet, then it counts as a trial shift - which basically means it was more like a rejection after an interview rather than being fired. The clear instructions thing can be really frustrating in a new job when nobody is taking the time to train you or explain properly - but honestly you could go to another Domino's and have a completely different experience. It's usually about the people, not the job. Working somewhere repetitive can be a little soul-draining, but repetitive is also predictable, and that may be the best option for you right now. I worked as a warehouse sorter once and it was great for that sort of thing. I just checked labels on boxes and put them in the correct cages, I got to organise stuff so it all fit nicely like Tetris. Warehouses can be daunting because they usually look for a certain demographic to hire, aka big and strong, and there's a requirement to be able to lift 25kg, but they hired me as a 5ft woman with 0 muscle and back issues (though I didn't tell them about that lol). So, yeah that's my advice. Warehouses! (Plus they pay better than cafes and shops)

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