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I am a pilot working towards a commercial licence. Ask me anything!

I was reading through aviation and flight training related posts on here and there seems to be a lot of misconceptions and misinformation being spread about becoming a pilot.
I will answer any questions you have about flight training and general aviation in the UK! ask away.
I also posted the general modular training route in another discussion last year. I will post it again here so you can get the basic route explained.

Abbreviations: (PPL- Private Pilot Licence, CPL- Commercial Pilot License, ATPL- Airline Transport Pilot Licence, MEP- Multi Engine Piston, MEIR- Multi Engine Instrument Rating, APS MCC Course - Airline Pilot Standard Multi Crew Cooperation Course) I will post as much detail as possible but if you have any other questions you can private message me. I will explain the modular training route first which is pay as you fly. In order from first to last: PPL training 45 hours minimum training (although most finish in 55-65 hours). PPL will cost you around £9k-£12k
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Hour Building, ATPL exams and CPL After the PPL comes the CPL, however you need 150 hours of total flight time under your belt to start this training. This will usually take 1-3 years depending on how much you fly. During this time you will also need to study for and pass 13 ATPL exams (You have 18 months to do them from date of first exam). After passing the last ATPL exam you have 13 months to Obtain a CPL and your MEIR which I explain next.
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MEP and MEIR these 2 ratings make you qualified to fly multi engine planes and allow you to fly using instruments (in cloud, low visibility, the MEIR is considered the hardest part of training). Once you have obtained these ratings and a CPL along with passed ATPL exams you now have a frozen ATPL which makes you eligible to apply for airline jobs.
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APS MCC Course This is the very last step in your training journey, this course teaches you how to work as part of a multi person crew. It also teaches you Crew Recourse Management, which allows you to best deal with emergencies and procedures in the air. This course is also crucial in helping you pass your first airline interview. This whole modular journey will take anywhere from 4-6 years and will cost you £65k-£75k. The good thing with modular is that you pay as you fly, so hourly. This makes this route very affordable and you can work and fly at the same time.
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As opposed to modular you can do an integrated course, this will do all the steps mentioned above but in 18 months instead of 6 years. These courses will cost you £100k-£120k, which you have to pay as a down payment or in large instalments. You do not need a university degree to become a pilot but it is recommended as backup since aviation is such an unpredictable industry and jobs can be hard to come by at times.
Reply 2
Hi, Im looking to be a pilot. any tips on how to fund the process? Im aware of modular training but it seems like its frowned upon by major airlines.
Original post by ouiuiuiu
Hi, Im looking to be a pilot. any tips on how to fund the process? Im aware of modular training but it seems like its frowned upon by major airlines.

Modular training is absolutely not frowned upon by major airlines, only easyjet in the UK don't hire modular trained pilots mainly because they don't want to spend time verifying your quality of training, everyone else hires modular. I fund my training just by working, a lot of people work full time jobs and fly on weekends. Save up for the MEIR and CPL as that's most expensive. It will take 4-5 years but all good things require hard work.
Original post by flyingpiper26
Modular training is absolutely not frowned upon by major airlines, only easyjet in the UK don't hire modular trained pilots mainly because they don't want to spend time verifying your quality of training, everyone else hires modular. I fund my training just by working, a lot of people work full time jobs and fly on weekends. Save up for the MEIR and CPL as that's most expensive. It will take 4-5 years but all good things require hard work.

Whats the process of modular training and what are the separate modules? Also how long will it take if i do my studies during the weekend?
Original post by aexolgmailom
Whats the process of modular training and what are the separate modules? Also how long will it take if i do my studies during the weekend?

Hi i have listed the modules in my reply to the first post. If you only fly on weekends it can take 2-3 years depending on weather and how much money you can spent. If you fly 2 hours each weekend you could do 8 hours per month and get through training in 2-3 years. But usually its more like 4 years due to weather in the uk.
What do you think about cadet programmes, such as those provided by British Airways? I was looking into them but they seem to be very competitive.
Original post by taskmgr1
What do you think about cadet programmes, such as those provided by British Airways? I was looking into them but they seem to be very competitive.
They are very good but highly competitive, would not bank on them. Its always worth applying for if its free and you meet the requirements but not worth going for paid cadet programs (usually in the region of 100k). Unfortunately only 100 out of something like 23k go through on the BA one.

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