The Student Room Group

MSc Psychological Science academic standing

I’m a qualified and experienced teacher who is considering training as an educational psychologist. As my undergraduate degree is not in psychology I’m looking into conversion masters to gain entry into a doctorate.
Due to financial and time considerations, the best option for me is to complete a full time masters and to do so at home (Northern Ireland). Queens offer a one year conversion masters in Psychological Science.
My question is, does anyone have any insight into whether this course will be regarded in the same light as a MSc Psychology conversion degree?
In addition, I’ve seen that in the same course at Glasgow they say the course is ideal for science graduates- does anyone know if a psychological science course is particularly science based? As I am not a science graduate.
(edited 2 months ago)
Original post by emily26
I’m a qualified and experienced teacher who is considering training as an educational psychologist. As my undergraduate degree is not in psychology I’m looking into conversion masters to gain entry into a doctorate.
Due to financial and time considerations, the best option for me is to complete a full time masters and to do so at home (Northern Ireland). Queens offer a one year conversion masters in Psychological Science.
My question is, does anyone have any insight into whether this course will be regarded in the same light as a MSc Psychology conversion degree?
In addition, I’ve seen that in the same course at Glasgow they say the course is ideal for science graduates- does anyone know if a psychological science course is particularly science based? As I am not a science graduate.

The only way in which a conversion course will be "judged" is whether or not it is accredited by the BPS. Msc Psychological Science at Queen's University of Belfast is so accredited and confers eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (source). That's the only thing that matters.

Psychology is a science, so any Psychology course will be "particularly science based". However, the course does not require a science background.
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia
The only way in which a conversion course will be "judged" is whether or not it is accredited by the BPS. Msc Psychological Science at Queen's University of Belfast is so accredited and confers eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (source). That's the only thing that matters.
Psychology is a science, so any Psychology course will be "particularly science based". However, the course does not require a science background.

Thank you for your reply. I had hoped it was the case that BPS accreditation was the main consideration so that’s great to hear.
I am aware of the scientific nature of the subject but was curious as to whether psychological science had a more scientific focus than a course titled psychology. I’m glad to hear a science background is not seen as necessary, so thank you for that also.
Original post by emily26
...but was curious as to whether psychological science had a more scientific focus than a course titled psychology.

Some universities name their conversion courses (or undergraduate courses) differently just to stand-out, and to appeal to potential candidates. I suspect that's what Queen's have done.

Have you gone through the modules and compared them with a conversion course simply named "Psychology"? I suspect you'll find that they're very similar.

On a three-year undergraduate course, it takes roughly the years to cover the mandatory BPS content. So an undergraduate course will have a range of other additional modules which students can choose from which might be of interest to them. That same two years of content must be covered on a one-year conversion course (albeit it's a longer academic year). So there really isn't much opportunity to make it more or less science focused - they have too much mandatory content to get through. They therefore need candidates which they know are capable of hard work, which is why they mandate a 2.1 Honours degree (or above), regardless of the subject.

The modules Queen's list (here) are:
Applications of Psychology in the ‘Real World’ (30 credits)
Research Thesis Psychology (60 credits)
Core Psychology II (30 credits)
Core Psychology I (30 credits)
Methods, Design and Analysis in Psychology (30 credits)

Those are just standard modules. There's nothing particular science-focused about them.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending