The Student Room Group

Struggling with A Level Chemistry…

Hi, I’m currently having difficulties with A Level Chemistry. It seems to be that I make contradictions or plainly wrong statements in my answers and often draw skeletal formula . I’m thinking is it something wrong with how I’ve learnt the basics? I.e if I learnt them and made mistakes or misconceptions.

If so, how do you recommend fixing it?
Reply 1
Hi! Can you be a bit more specific about your difficulties? Any example questions/answers?
Original post by Methene
Hi! Can you be a bit more specific about your difficulties? Any example questions/answers?

I feel like I’m struggling with organic chemistry the most, not any specific questions, but mostly I struggle with exam technique and the analysis questions
Original post by kitty15
Hi, I’m currently having difficulties with A Level Chemistry. It seems to be that I make contradictions or plainly wrong statements in my answers and often draw skeletal formula . I’m thinking is it something wrong with how I’ve learnt the basics? I.e if I learnt them and made mistakes or misconceptions.

If so, how do you recommend fixing it?

Honestly, the best thing you can do is attempt exam questions, mark them and make sure to add the corrections as per the mark scheme afterwards. You should begin to see what sorts of things come up a lot and what examiners want you to put in your answers for particular question types.

Say for example you see a lot of “why is the melting point of X higher than that of Y?” type questions. These would require you to identify the types of intermolecular forces and compare their relative strengths, then state something to the effect of stronger forces in X means more energy needed to overcome them, so X has the higher melting point.

I think it is also helpful to underline or highlight things like command words in questions so as to not lose sight of what you need to do. The Edexcel A level chemistry specification has a pretty comprehensive list of command words and what they mean somewhere towards the end and these pages may be worth keeping a copy of, regardless of the exam board you are with.

If you are having doubts about the basics, I think you need to consult the notes on physics and maths tutor. They are beautifully written and organised, which means you should be able to quickly check your understanding of these areas against them. Failing that, Allery Chemistry and many other resources are out there with videos/notes on all manner of A level topics.
(edited 1 month ago)
Original post by UtterlyUseless69
Honestly, the best thing you can do is attempt exam questions, mark them and make sure to add the corrections as per the mark scheme afterwards. You should begin to see what sorts of things come up a lot and what examiners want you to put in your answers for particular question types.
Say for example you see a lot of “why is the melting point of X higher than that of Y?” type questions. These would require you to identify the types of intermolecular forces and compare their relative strengths, then state something to the effect of stronger forces in X means more energy needed to overcome them, so X has the higher melting point.
I think it is also helpful to underline or highlight things like command words in questions so as to not lose sight of what you need to do. The Edexcel A level chemistry specification has a pretty comprehensive list of command words and what they mean somewhere towards the end and these pages may be worth keeping a copy of, regardless of the exam board you are with.
If you are having doubts about the basics, I think you need to consult the notes on physics and maths tutor. They are beautifully written and organised, which means you should be able to quickly check your understanding of these areas against them. Failing that, Allery Chemistry and many other resources are out there with videos/notes on all manner of A level topics.

Okay thank you!

Quick Reply

Latest