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cons of uni of kent higher/degree? professional economics course??

cons of uni of kent higher/degree? professional economics course??
Original post by autumnal-flag
cons of uni of kent higher/degree? professional economics course??

Hi there

I am a current final year law student at Kent, although I do not take economics, hopefully I can give some insights into what it is like studying at Kent. My overall experience so far at Kent has been really positive, though if you have any specific concerns please feel free to ask, I'll be happy to answer them.

I chose the University both because of the course structure and the campus. Have you had a chance to attend one of the open days? The campus is really vibrant during the weekdays, but you also have more peaceful periods during the weekends. πŸ™‚ The facilities are neat and well kept, and there is a lot of greenery on campus, which makes it lovely. The University is located really close to city centre as well, so travelling for shopping and social events will also be convenient. (We also have close access to the train stations, which are really convenient). If you get the chance to attend an open day, you will also have the opportunity to speak to subject-specific staff to get a better idea of what your course is like. πŸ™‚

Kent offers a lot of support to students, including: academic, wellbeing and careers support. For my course, we are able to access help from our seminar leaders, module convenors, academic advisors, and peers. I believe there will be similar support for the economics course too. πŸ™‚

If you are interested in any specific aspects of studying at Kent, do not hesitate to ask!
Chloe
University of Kent Student Rep
Original post by autumnal-flag
cons of uni of kent higher/degree? professional economics course??

Hey @autumnal-flag,

I hope you're keeping well.

I'm an Economics student here at the Uni, and I've spoken quite regularly to the senior tutor of the Higher Degree Apprenticeship Programme (DAP) about the course itself.
To answer your question quite honestly and forthright, the main cons that come with DAP are that it is a very competitive course to enter, and that it is not an easy course to undertake either. We do say that our entry requirements are 120 UCAS points, but you'll honestly be competing with students who are averaging As & A*s. Essentially, I would say that 120 UCAS is the bare minimum, and if you are genuinely considering taking the course, you need to aim for As and A*s in your Alevels.
Alongside this, it's also not an easy course to go through either. You are balancing work prerogatives alongside University work schedules, whilst also any semblance of your own private life that you choose to keep. The good thing about this is that learning whilst gaining experience allows you to understand concepts which you would not normally be taught at your level of education if you were to study at Uni normally. The challenging part is that you'll be forced into learning concepts which Unis do not think is ready for your level of understanding. Of course, you will absolutely be receiving as much support from the Uni as we can give you, that's what we're here for ultimately. However, there will most likely be times when even lecturers here may be themselves confused as to what your workplace requires, or find themselves working out an answer to your question alongside you. Not to mention, there is always the risk that your own workplace may not want to keep you if they believe that your performance may not be up to their standards.

It can be quite a stressful role, but likewise also quite a fulfilling one, as your proudly able to get what most regular students could only dream of, which is good education mixed with relevant experience, at no debt, and with a secure job with great further opportunity lined up at the end of the programme.

I don't mean to be pessimistic, but I'd be lying to you if I said it'd be an easy, stress-free ride like most Uni courses. Nevertheless, most students who take it absolutely love it. I feel like it attracts a certain crowd of people, and I myself wish I had known about this when I was applying.

Anyways, I'll leave it at that so as to not bore or scare you too much!
Hope this helps.

Warm regards,

David :smile:
University of Kent Student Rep
Original post by University of Kent
Hey @autumnal-flag,
I hope you're keeping well.
I'm an Economics student here at the Uni, and I've spoken quite regularly to the senior tutor of the Higher Degree Apprenticeship Programme (DAP) about the course itself.
To answer your question quite honestly and forthright, the main cons that come with DAP are that it is a very competitive course to enter, and that it is not an easy course to undertake either. We do say that our entry requirements are 120 UCAS points, but you'll honestly be competing with students who are averaging As & A*s. Essentially, I would say that 120 UCAS is the bare minimum, and if you are genuinely considering taking the course, you need to aim for As and A*s in your Alevels.
Alongside this, it's also not an easy course to go through either. You are balancing work prerogatives alongside University work schedules, whilst also any semblance of your own private life that you choose to keep. The good thing about this is that learning whilst gaining experience allows you to understand concepts which you would not normally be taught at your level of education if you were to study at Uni normally. The challenging part is that you'll be forced into learning concepts which Unis do not think is ready for your level of understanding. Of course, you will absolutely be receiving as much support from the Uni as we can give you, that's what we're here for ultimately. However, there will most likely be times when even lecturers here may be themselves confused as to what your workplace requires, or find themselves working out an answer to your question alongside you. Not to mention, there is always the risk that your own workplace may not want to keep you if they believe that your performance may not be up to their standards.
It can be quite a stressful role, but likewise also quite a fulfilling one, as your proudly able to get what most regular students could only dream of, which is good education mixed with relevant experience, at no debt, and with a secure job with great further opportunity lined up at the end of the programme.
I don't mean to be pessimistic, but I'd be lying to you if I said it'd be an easy, stress-free ride like most Uni courses. Nevertheless, most students who take it absolutely love it. I feel like it attracts a certain crowd of people, and I myself wish I had known about this when I was applying.
Anyways, I'll leave it at that so as to not bore or scare you too much!
Hope this helps.
Warm regards,
David :smile:
University of Kent Student Rep

thank you - i have a few more questions:


1.

how mathematical is it based?

2.

what does your final degree certificate say (ie. Bsc (Hons) Professional Economics or Bsc Economics or higher /degree level apprenticeship with ie. name of providers and how is it different from certificate presented at completion of your normal economics degree)?

3.

what accreditations does this course have?

4.

is the qualification internationally recognised?

5.

could you disclose a list of employers which I could potentially work with?

6.

will I be at a disadvantage earning /progression wise (eg: a couple years) after completing this course?

7.

will I be able to study a normal (ie. non- apprenticeship) masters or PHD in economics in the UK after completing this job?

8.

where do I apply (eg: UCAS?)?

9.

What are some possible career outcomes completing this course?

10.

Will I be at a disadvantage not having studied A level maths and economics?

Original post by autumnal-flag
thank you - i have a few more questions:

1.

how mathematical is it based?

2.

what does your final degree certificate say (ie. Bsc (Hons) Professional Economics or Bsc Economics or higher /degree level apprenticeship with ie. name of providers and how is it different from certificate presented at completion of your normal economics degree)?

3.

what accreditations does this course have?

4.

is the qualification internationally recognised?

5.

could you disclose a list of employers which I could potentially work with?

6.

will I be at a disadvantage earning /progression wise (eg: a couple years) after completing this course?

7.

will I be able to study a normal (ie. non- apprenticeship) masters or PHD in economics in the UK after completing this job?

8.

where do I apply (eg: UCAS?)?

9.

What are some possible career outcomes completing this course?

10.

Will I be at a disadvantage not having studied A level maths and economics?


Sure, no worries.
Sorry for the wait, it's on me. I was just on a trail trying to find who was the right person to ask for some help with the specifics, but turns out it didn't matter too much.

1) It is quite mathematically based. I should preface this by saying the sum total amount of maths you will do will depend on your employer, but you should be expecting quite a bit of mathematical work ahead of you. It won't be like an actual maths degree itself, but leaning quite heavily onto the modelling and data side of Economics. You'll be taught Mathematics modules, Statistics modules, data analysis modules, econometric modules, and also be expected to use the relevant mathematics and statistics you have been taught in other classes as well, for both understanding the material, and also whilst you are being examined. (Basically just using maths to back up your points)

2) I'm sorry, I'm not too sure ultimately what's on your certificate. I believe it would be something to the tune of "Degree Apprenticeship Programme - Government Economic Service", but don't quote me on that.

3) It's accredited by the University of Kent and the UK Government.

4) Yes. The University of Kent economics degree is recognised in Europe, USA, Japan, Australia, etc. in the sense that you won't need to complete any extra qualifications to find general economic work in those countries. (I.e. compared to something like accouting instead, where you may need to tailor that degree by taking extra exams and qualifications to be accredited by a relevant, national body)

5) As a list I'd say: HMRC, HM Treasury, Department for Work and Pensions, Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Home Office, Department for Education, Department for Transport and all departments who have Economic Advisors.

6) No :smile:

7) Yes, it's both a degree and apprenticeship.

8) You can apply for the 2024 GES DAP online via Civil Service Jobs

9) If you successfully complete the End Point Assessment, you could be entitled to permanent employment at the GES, an opportunity to apply via Fast Stream, or maybe even a promotion depending on your perceived skill. You could also just go into other general areas of economics which also interest you.

10) Probably. It shouldn't matter too much if your passionate about studying economics and willing to work through that. Even though Alevel Economics is quite useless at the degree level (in terms of applied knowledge and what you're specifically taught), it gives you good ways to understand how economists think through problems, how to navigate different conclusions in just basic conversation, and how to quickly assess the major factors within a certain topic, weigh them accordingly, and go on to argue for different conclusions which may not be the right decision if the weight assigned is wrong. As for maths, it's also not preferable to not have studied it as it helps you translate the logic and plain numbers given through calculation into actual economic terms and understand what your computing. Plus, knowing when it is relevant to utilise logarithms as opposed to general quadratic functions when thinking about economic utility in a model is quite tricky to wrap around your head unless you enjoy studying the maths, and show that via an Alevel.
I will say though, thankfully it is not a prerequisite for applying. You just need to ensure that your maths at GCSE was a minimum of B(6) and English Language a C(4).

Anyways, I hope this helps. :smile:

Warm regards,

David πŸ™‚
University of Kent Student Rep
(edited 1 month ago)

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