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University MPharm Entry Requirements

Hello, I am currently a BTEC Applied Science L3 Extended Diploma student and I am looking at the entry requirements of universities. I have a question for you here. First of all, some schools (such as Uni of Birmingham) accept BTEC Applied Science for MPharm, but they also require A Level Chemistry. How is this possible anyway? Isn't BTEC Applied Science Level 3 Extended Diploma equal to 3 A Levels? I also asked this to my school to see if I could do both A Level and BTEC Applied Science L3, but they said no. If they say no, how does this happen? Can someone tell me or how can I do it?
Original post by şirin
Hello, I am currently a BTEC Applied Science L3 Extended Diploma student and I am looking at the entry requirements of universities. I have a question for you here. First of all, some schools (such as Uni of Birmingham) accept BTEC Applied Science for MPharm, but they also require A Level Chemistry. How is this possible anyway? Isn't BTEC Applied Science Level 3 Extended Diploma equal to 3 A Levels? I also asked this to my school to see if I could do both A Level and BTEC Applied Science L3, but they said no. If they say no, how does this happen? Can someone tell me or how can I do it?

Some universities (including the University of Birmingham, it seems) don't feel that a BTEC Level 3 National Extended Diploma in Applied Science has sufficient chemistry content, given how important chemistry is to MPharm.

Just because your school won't allow you to take the Extended Diploma alongside an A level doesn't mean that other schools won't. Some schools don't allow students to take more than 3 A level, whilst others don't allow students to take less than four. Some schools offer the EPQ (which can lower grade requirements), whilst others don't. Schools make up their own rules here, there is little consistently.

Adding a Chemistry A level to your existing workload isn't something which you should do casually. It might turn out to be a very bad idea if your BTEC grades suffer as a result.

If your school won't allow you to take A level Chemistry, and you're sure you want to, them you'll need to do so as a private candidate. That means studying on your own (from books, the internet, etc.) and then taking the exams at a local exam centre (not your school). The problem you'll come across is arranging to do the required practicals, which are required to earn the practical endorsement alongside the A level itself. There will be a cost associated with this, naturally.

A much better option, I'd have thought, would be to focus on universities which are happy with the BTEC on its own.

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