The Student Room Group

is medicine realistic for me?

hello, i am abit unsure whether I should do medicine at uni, but im really passionate about doing it.
I got 7777776666 at GCSEs, with a 6 in maths, 7/6 in eng lang/lit and 7s in bio and chem.
I'm not sure what unis to apply to with these, but im working on getting my predicted grades from BBB to AAA
Hey there, thanks for posting a question in the Medicine forum. :biggrin:

The Medicine forum gets a high volume of questions being posted, and some of these are already answered by the resources and Megathreads that members of the community and volunteers have created. This is an automatic post which is designed to highlight these resources. Below is a list of threads and articles that could answer your question (you should be looking in the original post of the megathreads). If one of the below threads is a more relevant place to ask your question, please post a reply in that thread to ask your question. If your query is answered by one of the Megathreads or articles linked below, and you would like us to close this thread for you, please reply to this thread with just the words "thank you". A member of our team will then get it locked.

Megathreads
(Please read the first post, before then posting any further questions you have within that thread.)
The "Which Medical School Should I Apply To?" Uberthread
The Ultimate 'Am I Good Enough For Medicine?' Angst Thread
Medicine A-Level subjects queries
Work Experience and Voluntary Work

2023 Applicants:
Official Undergraduate Medicine 2023 Entry
Graduate Entry Medicine 2023 Entry
Medicine 2023 entry for resit / retake / gap year applicants
A100 Medicine for International Students 2023 Entry
Medicine Interview discussion 2023 Entry
2023 entry A100 / A101 Medicine fastest and slowest offer senders
Index of Individual Medical School Applicants' threads 2023 Entry

2024 Applicants :
Official Undergraduate Medicine 2024 Entry
Graduate Entry Medicine 2024 Entry
GAMSAT 2024 / 2025 entry discussions megathread
UCAT 2024 Entry Discussions Megathread

Other application years:
Graduate Entry Medicine 2025 Entry
Official Undergraduate Medicine 2025 Entry

Useful Articles:
GCSE Requirements for Medicine
Everything you need to know about the BMAT
Work Experience as a Graduate or Mature student
Medicine Personal Statement Advice
Medicine Personal Statement Advice (Graduate Entry)
Interview Frequently Asked Questions
MMI Medicine Interview Tips
What to do after an unsuccessful first application

If your query is answered by one of the Megathreads or articles linked above, and you would like us to close this thread for you, please reply to this thread with just the words "thank you". A member of our team will then get it locked.
Hiya! The academic requirements for every med uni is super variable and there isn't really a blanket statement like "you must get xyz grades to get into any med uni". When I applied this year, I used this brilliant resource:



It summarises the shortlisting process for an interview, their minimum GCSE and A level requirements, how they use the personal statement, average UCAT scores etc... You've probably heard that it doesn't matter what med school you go to, as long as you go to one and all goes well, you'll become a doctor! So it's a good idea to apply strategically, as unlike other courses, you can only apply to 4.

(The examples I give here are for non-contextual applicants, if you meet the uni's contextual criteria, you might be able to apply with lower predicted grades/GCSEs)

For example, if you manage to bump up those predicted grades to AAA, you might meet the A level requirements to the Uni of Manchester, but unfortunately, your GCSEs would mean that no matter how strong the rest of your application is, you wouldn't be invited to an interview (as of 2024 entry, they require at least 7 GCSEs at grade 7+).

However, other places like Newcastle (as of 2024 entry, no GCSE requirements + AAA), or Sheffield (as of 2024 entry, at least 5 GCSEs at grade 7+, with at least 6s in maths, eng lang, and science + AAA) would be good choices (note, these may all change for when you apply, so please make sure to go to the official university websites and carefully read their requirements to ensure you're not wasting an option). Of course, these are just a few examples, but I wanted to show you that some unis care about GCSEs, some don't, and some unis (like Birmingham) have their own scoring system.

I'm confident you'll get those predicted grades, but if worst comes to worst, if you take a look at the document I've linked at the top on page 6, it very nicely lists unis which either don't take into account A levels or allow applicants with AAB predictions.

Just as a note, the current application cycle was the last to use the "BMAT" and all the BMAT unis have switched over to the UCAT. Lots and lots of med schools have very strict/high UCAT cutoffs/averages so make sure that's also your top priority. (just like A level and GCSE requirements, if you don't meet the UCAT threshold, no matter how strong the rest of your application is, it won't go any further).

It's good to think about which unis you want to go to now (I assume you're in year 12), but I (and many other people I know) didn't even think about this until I got my UCAT results during the Summer holidays. Your UCAT score will probably be the final hurdle to jump before you get an interview invite. If you do this, you'll have your GCSEs, A level predictions, and UCAT score to hand, and you can filter through every medical school and shortlist based on "aspirational", "safe", and "avoid". Quoting directly from the document at the start: "[An aspirational choice] isn't one that you've missed the [GCSE/A level/UCAT] cut off for! That's not an aspirational choice - it's a foolish one!"

Of course, these are all just pointers, but there's no reason at all why you can't apply. If you manage to get predicted AAA and with your GCSEs, so many doors will be open for you! When it comes to applying, it's obviously important to look at where you want to spend the next 5/6 years of your life and where you'll be happiest, but it's also important to be realistic and apply to your strengths. Work hard for your UCAT and A levels, keep up the volunteering/work experience, write a banging personal statement, apply strategically and prepare well for interviews, then watch those interviews and offers roll in!

Good luck! :smile:
Reply 3
Original post by waterycelery
Hiya! The academic requirements for every med uni is super variable and there isn't really a blanket statement like "you must get xyz grades to get into any med uni". When I applied this year, I used this brilliant resource:

It summarises the shortlisting process for an interview, their minimum GCSE and A level requirements, how they use the personal statement, average UCAT scores etc... You've probably heard that it doesn't matter what med school you go to, as long as you go to one and all goes well, you'll become a doctor! So it's a good idea to apply strategically, as unlike other courses, you can only apply to 4.
(The examples I give here are for non-contextual applicants, if you meet the uni's contextual criteria, you might be able to apply with lower predicted grades/GCSEs)
For example, if you manage to bump up those predicted grades to AAA, you might meet the A level requirements to the Uni of Manchester, but unfortunately, your GCSEs would mean that no matter how strong the rest of your application is, you wouldn't be invited to an interview (as of 2024 entry, they require at least 7 GCSEs at grade 7+).
However, other places like Newcastle (as of 2024 entry, no GCSE requirements + AAA), or Sheffield (as of 2024 entry, at least 5 GCSEs at grade 7+, with at least 6s in maths, eng lang, and science + AAA) would be good choices (note, these may all change for when you apply, so please make sure to go to the official university websites and carefully read their requirements to ensure you're not wasting an option). Of course, these are just a few examples, but I wanted to show you that some unis care about GCSEs, some don't, and some unis (like Birmingham) have their own scoring system.
I'm confident you'll get those predicted grades, but if worst comes to worst, if you take a look at the document I've linked at the top on page 6, it very nicely lists unis which either don't take into account A levels or allow applicants with AAB predictions.
Just as a note, the current application cycle was the last to use the "BMAT" and all the BMAT unis have switched over to the UCAT. Lots and lots of med schools have very strict/high UCAT cutoffs/averages so make sure that's also your top priority. (just like A level and GCSE requirements, if you don't meet the UCAT threshold, no matter how strong the rest of your application is, it won't go any further).
It's good to think about which unis you want to go to now (I assume you're in year 12), but I (and many other people I know) didn't even think about this until I got my UCAT results during the Summer holidays. Your UCAT score will probably be the final hurdle to jump before you get an interview invite. If you do this, you'll have your GCSEs, A level predictions, and UCAT score to hand, and you can filter through every medical school and shortlist based on "aspirational", "safe", and "avoid". Quoting directly from the document at the start: "[An aspirational choice] isn't one that you've missed the [GCSE/A level/UCAT] cut off for! That's not an aspirational choice - it's a foolish one!"
Of course, these are all just pointers, but there's no reason at all why you can't apply. If you manage to get predicted AAA and with your GCSEs, so many doors will be open for you! When it comes to applying, it's obviously important to look at where you want to spend the next 5/6 years of your life and where you'll be happiest, but it's also important to be realistic and apply to your strengths. Work hard for your UCAT and A levels, keep up the volunteering/work experience, write a banging personal statement, apply strategically and prepare well for interviews, then watch those interviews and offers roll in!
Good luck! :smile:

this was so encouraging, thank you so much!
Original post by itsvarr
hello, i am abit unsure whether I should do medicine at uni, but im really passionate about doing it.
I got 7777776666 at GCSEs, with a 6 in maths, 7/6 in eng lang/lit and 7s in bio and chem.
I'm not sure what unis to apply to with these, but im working on getting my predicted grades from BBB to AAA


If you avoid GCSE heavy medical schools (e.g. Oxford, Cardiff) and focus on ones with just minimum GCSE requirements (e.g. UCL, Imperial) or that don't weight them much relative to other factors like the UCAT, then you should be fine on the GCSE front.

You do really need to be predicted AAA or above though, and prepare well for the UCAT (for those that require it - I believe some medical schools that are lighter on GCSEs weight the UCAT more heavily)
Reply 5
A levels matter the most as long as you get AAA or A*A*A* for them (biology chem maths are needed for medicine) then u can go to most wellknown schools. Start getting work experience and get in vol
Reply 6
Original post by Xeferity
A levels matter the most as long as you get AAA or A*A*A* for them (biology chem maths are needed for medicine) then u can go to most wellknown schools. Start getting work experience and get in vol

Maths is only needed for 1 med school, provided you have chem and bio.
Very few med schools use A levels for shortlisting, most just use them as a minimum requirement and there are far more using GCSEs to decide who to interview. 3A*s adds nothing over A*AA except at Exeter, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Dundee and Aberdeen. Other than that, med schools use UCAT and/or GCSEs to shortlist. If you include all med schools, UCAT matters the most, then GCSEs, then A levels, in terms of importance for getting an interview.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending