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Path to becoming a doctor in the UK

Hi there, I wanted to know the route to becoming a doctor after choosing A levels! I would pick Biology, Chemistry and Maths for my A levels, and maybe another subject, and then I'd apply to university. After that, what happens? Could you explain the different approaches universities take to medicine, for instance the traditional learning approach? That would be much appreciated. Also, I'd like to become a cardiologist or neurologist. After how many years of studying do you need to specialise in 1 subject?

If someone could explain what happens each year, and the whole process of becoming a doctor, I would really appreciate it ๐Ÿ™‚

Thanks for any answers, sorry for long post ๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ™‚
(btw i couldnt post in medicine forum bc they dont answer ur questions directly)
Original post by Sonia334
Hi there, I wanted to know the route to becoming a doctor after choosing A levels! I would pick Biology, Chemistry and Maths for my A levels, and maybe another subject, and then I'd apply to university. After that, what happens? Could you explain the different approaches universities take to medicine, for instance the traditional learning approach? That would be much appreciated. Also, I'd like to become a cardiologist or neurologist. After how many years of studying do you need to specialise in 1 subject?

If someone could explain what happens each year, and the whole process of becoming a doctor, I would really appreciate it ๐Ÿ™‚

Thanks for any answers, sorry for long post ๐Ÿ˜…๐Ÿ™‚
(btw i couldnt post in medicine forum bc they dont answer ur questions directly)

Your only route at present is to do a medical degree after your A-levels. This takes 5-6 years. Then you'll begin the foundation programme as a doctor, which lasts 2 years and you'll rotate through various specialties. You then apply to further specialty or GP training. For cardiology or neurology you have to dual train in general internal medicine as well. After foundation you would do IMT as your core training for 3 years then apply to higher specialty training in neurology or cardiology (which are both 5 years). You'll then be able to apply to consultant posts in your specialty area.

In total this would be then 15-16 years total. But bear in mind, 10 of those you're going to be working as a doctor. However also bear in mind for the first 10 of those (medical degree, foundation, and IMT) you would be working across the full range of medicine and not in a single specialty area, so you need to be motivated for medicine in general and not just a single field (you'll specialise in that later!).

Also not sure what you mean about not being able to post in the medicine forum as that is where the thread is now and people directly answer questions there constantly. That said I'd note all of the above and also a lot of your questions are things that are very easy to find out yourself though - for the things about different approaches to teaching at medical school I'd suggest exploring the topic a bit more yourself first to get a better idea by yourself first :smile:
(edited 1 month ago)
Hello,

My name is Haya and I will graduate from medical school in a month!

Let me tell you how it usually goes:

1.

Undergraduate Medicine: 5 years or 6 (if you will intercalate), before you apply you have to sit the UCAT (an aptitude test) and go through an interview MMI

2.

Post Grad Medicine: you do an undergrad degree in biomedical or bio or something in healthcare and then you apply for post grad degree (4 years), only some universities offer this

3.

Foundation entry into Medicine: if you did not get your required grades, some universities offer a foundation year with progression into the MBBS. MB Chb course.

After medical school, you have to do two foundation years (f1 and f2) where you apply nationally and rank the different areas you want to work in. You will do about 3 different specialities in each year. At the beginning of F2 you will have to start to apply to the different training, if you are interested in these specialties it is usually an internal medicine route (3 year s) and then a further specialist training.




My advice would be don't worry too much about speciality training now because things are changing. The most important part is getting into medical school.Also medicine is a journey and a lot of the times people take time off for research or personal circumstances and often don't finish training until after. Otherwise, it is a very rewarding job and really fun to study.

Let me know if you have any other questions.

Best of luck,
Haya - MBBS V

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