The Student Room Group

Uni of nottingham / birmingham/ york acceptance rate

Hi!

I am having trouble deciding my insurance choice.
My firm gave me a really good reduced offer for AAB but I cannot decide on my insurance.

The University of Nottingham is asking for AAB
The University of Birmingham is asking for AAA (AAB if I firm)
The University of York is asking for ABB

It does seem obvious to choose York,but I am not sure what to go with because in the past both Nottingham and Birmingham have accepted lower grades (ABB, BBB (apparently) and I would prefer to go to one of those if I do have the option.

I’m just really confused because I don’t want to be silly and make the wrong choice as there is a lower offer which is a guarantee unlike the others.

I understand that things vary from year to year and it would be risky to go with UOB as an Insurance as they are already asking for AAA.

I just need help because I want to ease the stress of choosing my Unis.

Thank you!
Original post by Am4a7r12
Hi!

I am having trouble deciding my insurance choice.
My firm gave me a really good reduced offer for AAB but I cannot decide on my insurance.

The University of Nottingham is asking for AAB
The University of Birmingham is asking for AAA (AAB if I firm)
The University of York is asking for ABB

It does seem obvious to choose York,but I am not sure what to go with because in the past both Nottingham and Birmingham have accepted lower grades (ABB, BBB (apparently) and I would prefer to go to one of those if I do have the option.

I’m just really confused because I don’t want to be silly and make the wrong choice as there is a lower offer which is a guarantee unlike the others.

I understand that things vary from year to year and it would be risky to go with UOB as an Insurance as they are already asking for AAA.

I just need help because I want to ease the stress of choosing my Unis.

Thank you!

Given where you posted this, I assume you've applied for Law at each uni. Is that right?

According to The Uni Guide, for Law at University of Birmingham, the "Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)" are History A | English Literature A | Psychology A". That would tend to suggest that if they do confirm the place of some "near miss" candidates on results day, it's not enough to impact the "most common" grades of students there (source).

For Law at University of Nottingham, the same site quotes the "Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)" as "History A | English Literature A | Mathematics A". This would again suggest that not enough "near miss" candidates are accepted to make an impact on the "most common" grades overall (source).

Given that your stated objective is to "ease the stress of choosing my Unis" it might not be sensible to insure either of these, as the only way doing so would be of any value would be if they get fewer offer-holders meeting their offer grades than they'd expected, and so have to accept "near miss" candidates. That's a gamble - which tends to be associated with stress.

Of course, it really comes down to whether, for you, the risk of ending-up in Clearing is worth the risk of going to York when you could have gone to Nottingham or Birmingham, which you say you prefer. Only you know what your risk appetite is.

The only other information I have for you is that although quite a few courses went into Clearing at University of Birmingham last year, Law was not one of them.
Reply 2
Original post by DataVenia
Given where you posted this, I assume you've applied for Law at each uni. Is that right?
According to The Uni Guide, for Law at University of Birmingham, the "Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)" are History A | English Literature A | Psychology A". That would tend to suggest that if they do confirm the place of some "near miss" candidates on results day, it's not enough to impact the "most common" grades of students there (source).
For Law at University of Nottingham, the same site quotes the "Most popular A-Levels studied (and grade achieved)" as "History A | English Literature A | Mathematics A". This would again suggest that not enough "near miss" candidates are accepted to make an impact on the "most common" grades overall (source).
Given that your stated objective is to "ease the stress of choosing my Unis" it might not be sensible to insure either of these, as the only way doing so would be of any value would be if they get fewer offer-holders meeting their offer grades than they'd expected, and so have to accept "near miss" candidates. That's a gamble - which tends to be associated with stress.
Of course, it really comes down to whether, for you, the risk of ending-up in Clearing is worth the risk of going to York when you could have gone to Nottingham or Birmingham, which you say you prefer. Only you know what your risk appetite is.
The only other information I have for you is that although quite a few courses went into Clearing at University of Birmingham last year, Law was not one of them.

Hi,

Thank you so much for your reply!

I saw those sources too and according to that the obvious choice is well.. York.

However what has really torn my decision are these statistics https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10006840/K0156/Full-time/

And

https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10007167/UUBLAWSLAW3~UBLAWSLAW3/Full-time/

(If you scroll to the bottom and go onto ‘Entry Information’ you will see what I am referring to)

According to these statistics and other students who have been accepted onto the Law course, they are apparently very similar in leniency with York being the harshest.

Again, the same argument applies - things change every year and there’s no certain for anything, hell, (a bit extreme) Oxford could have Law in clearing if circumstances were such.

It’s a very annoying yet stressful procedure this.
Original post by Am4a7r12
Hi,

Thank you so much for your reply!

I saw those sources too and according to that the obvious choice is well.. York.

However what has really torn my decision are these statistics https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10006840/K0156/Full-time/

And

https://discoveruni.gov.uk/course-details/10007167/UUBLAWSLAW3~UBLAWSLAW3/Full-time/

(If you scroll to the bottom and go onto ‘Entry Information’ you will see what I am referring to)

According to these statistics and other students who have been accepted onto the Law course, they are apparently very similar in leniency with York being the harshest.

Again, the same argument applies - things change every year and there’s no certain for anything, hell, (a bit extreme) Oxford could have Law in clearing if circumstances were such.

It’s a very annoying yet stressful procedure this.

I agree that the whole process is horribly stressful. It's also designed to force 17/18-year olds to gamble when it comes to their future. UCAS keep looking at reforming it, but never change anything significant.

I sometimes look at the DiscoverUni data, but hate the way that they band the UCAS points, so tend to stick with the data on The Uni Guide.

Anyway, I have another set of data to throw at you. For each "subject area" (not specific course) UCAS publish statistics which how how many applicants were accepted, by university, and show whether they applied via the "main scheme" (the usual "pick five choices" process) or not (i.e. they applied via Extra or Clearing).

You can see all these numbers here (pick Applications and Acceptances in the bottom left to start, and then filter as you wish).

According to this, University of Birmingham accepted 560 applicants into "Law" (generally) last year, of which 45 didn't apply via the main scheme, of which 20 were domiciled in the UK.

The same numbers for University of Nottingham are 455 accepted, of which 20 were not via the main scheme, of which 5 were domiciled in the UK.

We don't know what grades these students got, only that they applied via Extra or Clearing and were accepted. This does suggest that some applicants who just miss their offer grades might be accepted.

So it all comes down to how much of a gambler you are. Are you feeling lucky? :smile:
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia
I agree that the whole process is horribly stressful. It's also designed to force 17/18-year olds to gamble when it comes to their future. UCAS keep looking at reforming it, but never change anything significant.
I sometimes look at the DiscoverUni data, but hate the way that they band the UCAS points, so tend to stick with the data on The Uni Guide.
Anyway, I have another set of data to throw at you. For each "subject area" (not specific course) UCAS publish statistics which how how many applicants were accepted, by university, and show whether they applied via the "main scheme" (the usual "pick five choices" process) or not (i.e. they applied via Extra or Clearing).
You can see all these numbers here (pick Applications and Acceptances in the bottom left to start, and then filter as you wish).
According to this, University of Birmingham accepted 560 applicants into "Law" (generally) last year, of which 45 didn't apply via the main scheme, of which 20 were domiciled in the UK.
The same numbers for University of Nottingham are 455 accepted, of which 20 were not via the main scheme, of which 5 were domiciled in the UK.
We don't know what grades these students got, only that they applied via Extra or Clearing and were accepted. This does suggest that some applicants who just miss their offer grades might be accepted.
So it all comes down to how much of a gambler you are. Are you feeling lucky? :smile:


Being that my firm is AAB (from A*AA) I think the lowest they would take is ABB.

I would have to expect either Nottingham or Birmingham would take that or lower 😬😬

I have no idea what option (well gamble) to really take for my worst case..

If you have anything to say to this please help, you’re the only help I’ve found so far 😭
Reply 5
Original post by DataVenia
I agree that the whole process is horribly stressful. It's also designed to force 17/18-year olds to gamble when it comes to their future. UCAS keep looking at reforming it, but never change anything significant.
I sometimes look at the DiscoverUni data, but hate the way that they band the UCAS points, so tend to stick with the data on The Uni Guide.
Anyway, I have another set of data to throw at you. For each "subject area" (not specific course) UCAS publish statistics which how how many applicants were accepted, by university, and show whether they applied via the "main scheme" (the usual "pick five choices" process) or not (i.e. they applied via Extra or Clearing).
You can see all these numbers here (pick Applications and Acceptances in the bottom left to start, and then filter as you wish).
According to this, University of Birmingham accepted 560 applicants into "Law" (generally) last year, of which 45 didn't apply via the main scheme, of which 20 were domiciled in the UK.
The same numbers for University of Nottingham are 455 accepted, of which 20 were not via the main scheme, of which 5 were domiciled in the UK.
We don't know what grades these students got, only that they applied via Extra or Clearing and were accepted. This does suggest that some applicants who just miss their offer grades might be accepted.
So it all comes down to how much of a gambler you are. Are you feeling lucky? :smile:


Also, this may be a silly question to ask but are you saying that 560 applicants got accepted onto the law course for Birmingham and 455 into Nottingham?

Also, the website seems to be laggy on my phone as I am trying to check for the University of Manchester Law applicants for last year too.

If it wouldn’t be a bother, could you check that for me too (I apologise for the hassle)
Original post by Am4a7r12
Also, this may be a silly question to ask but are you saying that 560 applicants got accepted onto the law course for Birmingham and 455 into Nottingham?

Also, the website seems to be laggy on my phone as I am trying to check for the University of Manchester Law applicants for last year too.

If it wouldn’t be a bother, could you check that for me too (I apologise for the hassle)

Sometimes I regret posting data because people misread what I've written or focus on the wrong thing. This is one of those occasions. I was trying to draw your attention to the proportion of accepted applicants who applied via Extra or Clearing, not point out the absolute number of acceptances at any I'd those universities.

Also, I am explicitly not saying anything about any law course. I thought I was quite clear about that. I even used italicised the word "not" when I wrote, "For each "subject area" (not specific course)".

UCAS don't release this data at the course level, only at the top-level within the Common Aggregation Hierarchy (CAH). The numbers I quoted were for CAH16 Law, which probably covers every law course within each university's law school. Lots of courses, hence lots of students.

For CAH16 (the general subject area of law - NOT any one specific law course), University of Manchester accepted 355 candidates, of which 10 applied via Extra/Clearing, of which all were domiciled in the UK.
Reply 7
York does not have the reputation for Law that the others do.

Quick Reply

Latest

Trending

Trending