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What doctor job pays the most?

I look on different websites for different average salaries of jobs in medicine, but they all appear to be different.

For example, some websites say a cardiologist makes 200k a year, but some websites say they make 60k.

These are the jobs I am considering:
-General practitioner
-General surgeon
-Cardiologist

Straight AFTER you get a medical degree, what are all of the next steps? Could someone tell me what you would have to do to get each job, and compare their salaries?

Thank you very much!
Original post by School_Student99
I look on different websites for different average salaries of jobs in medicine, but they all appear to be different.
For example, some websites say a cardiologist makes 200k a year, but some websites say they make 60k.
These are the jobs I am considering:
-General practitioner
-General surgeon
-Cardiologist
Straight AFTER you get a medical degree, what are all of the next steps? Could someone tell me what you would have to do to get each job, and compare their salaries?
Thank you very much!

are these realistic for you? it doesnt sound like you're interested in subjects
There are plenty of places you can find out online what happens post medical degree if you take the time to look, are you in medical school or is this something else? it seems either very lazy, very naive or bordering on arrogance.

Each of the very different jobs you have listed as if this is an episode of greys anatomy are different in their training structure they have very different training structures too.

Using the internet beyond searching for salary you can see the registers on the GMC/BMJ between the specialists and the GP registers.

You can also see the consultant salary in the NHS which is a standard issue considering its public sector, before any extra leadership roles are absorbed or PAs taken. If you want to then compare that privately, you can.

Generally speaking, if you want to be a consultant in the UK you will go through two FY training years and then 5-8 ST or CT+ years which have differing pay scales within them, the ironic "junior doctor" and ST5 is roughly the same as a band 8a then depending on the specialty you will be able to apply for consultant posts where the salary increases significantly. If you go into very specialist roles the ST can grow beyond others.
Hey! So, about the salaries, they can vary a lot depending on where you work, how experienced you are, and other factors. Generally, though, specialists like cardiologists tend to make more than general practitioners and even general surgeons, though all can earn pretty well with experience.

Right after med school, regardless of which path you choose, you'll start with a residency. For a general practitioner, that's usually about 3 years. General surgeons go through a 5-year surgical residency, and cardiologists first do a 3-year internal medicine residency, followed by a 3-year cardiology fellowship.

Salaries during residency are generally lower, and then they increase significantly once you're fully licensed and practicing. Cardiologists typically earn the most, followed by general surgeons, and then GPs. Each job has its own path and demands, so think about what fits your interests and lifestyle best!
Original post by jamesharris2005
Hey! So, about the salaries, they can vary a lot depending on where you work, how experienced you are, and other factors. Generally, though, specialists like cardiologists tend to make more than general practitioners and even general surgeons, though all can earn pretty well with experience.
Right after med school, regardless of which path you choose, you'll start with a residency. For a general practitioner, that's usually about 3 years. General surgeons go through a 5-year surgical residency, and cardiologists first do a 3-year internal medicine residency, followed by a 3-year cardiology fellowship.
Salaries during residency are generally lower, and then they increase significantly once you're fully licensed and practicing. Cardiologists typically earn the most, followed by general surgeons, and then GPs. Each job has its own path and demands, so think about what fits your interests and lifestyle best!

This is the UK
Original post by jamesharris2005
Hey! So, about the salaries, they can vary a lot depending on where you work, how experienced you are, and other factors. Generally, though, specialists like cardiologists tend to make more than general practitioners and even general surgeons, though all can earn pretty well with experience.
Right after med school, regardless of which path you choose, you'll start with a residency. For a general practitioner, that's usually about 3 years. General surgeons go through a 5-year surgical residency, and cardiologists first do a 3-year internal medicine residency, followed by a 3-year cardiology fellowship.
Salaries during residency are generally lower, and then they increase significantly once you're fully licensed and practicing. Cardiologists typically earn the most, followed by general surgeons, and then GPs. Each job has its own path and demands, so think about what fits your interests and lifestyle best!

Hello, thanks for responding!

I thought you had to do 2 years in foundation training directly after med school, THEN decide which job you want (gp, cardiologist etc), and train for that job, complete the training then get the job. Was this not correct?

Thanks
Reply 6
Original post by School_Student99
Hello, thanks for responding!
I thought you had to do 2 years in foundation training directly after med school, THEN decide which job you want (gp, cardiologist etc), and train for that job, complete the training then get the job. Was this not correct?
Thanks

Yes this is correct for the UK, I think the other poster is based in the US

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