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Should I take creatine?

I've been working out for the past few months and I play badminton quite regularly. Over the next few years I want to bulk up (I'm 53kg , 5'10 and want to reach 65-70kg) and I guess my goal is to look more muscular but also have that useable athletic strength. I'm wondering if I should take creatine and what the advantages and disadvantages are. I've heard creatine can accelerate balding? I've also heard that creatine isn't good for people aged 18 (like myself) and I'm wondering whether the increase of water in my muscles will lead to a decrease in athletic ability as it's extra mass but no actual muscle. However I have heard of the advantages so just wondering whether I should take it from an objective pov. Thanks.
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Reply 1
You want to be fit, healthy and strong? Why would you want to screw up your body - the amazing intricate balance of your body systems that work interactively and function so well with a substance that is unproven for long term side effects and one which you would take purely for vanity? This has to be another great example of why 'survival of the fittest' keeps the population levels down.
Original post by Muttly
You want to be fit, healthy and strong? Why would you want to screw up your body - the amazing intricate balance of your body systems that work interactively and function so well with a substance that is unproven for long term side effects and one which you would take purely for vanity? This has to be another great example of why 'survival of the fittest' keeps the population levels down.

wdym? 😭
Advantages: you will probably put on a negligible amount of muscle, may make recovery a little easier.

Disadvantages: will give some people the runs when when they first start taking it (crystalline, poor water solubility).

The reason why creatine is recommended is there exists a strong body of evidence demonstrating its effectiveness without any serious side effects. However the effect size is small. It is not a miracle supplement and some people see no change.

Creatine does cause some water retention when you initially start taking it because if effects osmotic balance. Your body adapts to this, so the increase is only temporary. Regardless, an increase in water within muscle tissue won't decrease athletic performance.

There does not exist a body of evidence supporting the claim it causes or contributes to baldness.
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Original post by Muttly
You want to be fit, healthy and strong? Why would you want to screw up your body - the amazing intricate balance of your body systems that work interactively and function so well with a substance that is unproven for long term side effects and one which you would take purely for vanity? This has to be another great example of why 'survival of the fittest' keeps the population levels down.


Firstly, your claims are absolutely bilge. Secondly, why are you criticising someone who desires to better themselves?

We live in a society were a significant proportion of the population are struggling with diseases caused by obesity and physical inactivity and yet you feel compelled to attack those who desire to be muscular and athletic. Your perspective reminds me of people who wanted are you beach body ready? adverts banned because they were offended by the physique of the model.
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Reply 5
Original post by Gazpacho.
Advantages: you will probably put on a negligible amount of muscle, may make recovery a little easier.
Disadvantages: will give some people the runs when when they first start taking it (crystalline, poor water solubility).
The reason why creatine is recommended is there exists a strong body of evidence demonstrating its effectiveness without any serious side effects. However the effect size is small. It is not a miracle supplement and some people see no change.
Creatine does cause some water retention when you initially start taking it because if effects osmotic balance. Your body adapts to this, so the increase is only temporary. Regardless, an increase in water within muscle tissue won't decrease athletic performance.
There does not exist a body of evidence supporting the claim it causes or contributes to baldness.

Your own post is somewhat contradictory. If Creatine is so safe why are you citing all the side effects that you consider to be minor but acceptable in the pursuit of the body beautiful (for such a minor gain?) I wonder what organs in the body are affected by osmotic balance? I wonder how many legitimate trials have been completed to give assurances. Every drug, no matter how innocuous has side effects. Many long term effects are unknown. The public are the guinea pigs. I congratulate anyone who wants to improve their image or their physique but do so by sound whole food nutrition and a good exercise regime. Get the body you have to 100% efficiency first. Not by supplements of questionable quality or long term effect for a quick fix.
Original post by Muttly
Your own post is somewhat contradictory. If Creatine is so safe why are you citing all the side effects that you consider to be minor but acceptable in the pursuit of the body beautiful (for such a minor gain?) I wonder what organs in the body are affected by osmotic balance? I wonder how many legitimate trials have been completed to give assurances. Every drug, no matter how innocuous has side effects. Many long term effects are unknown. The public are the guinea pigs. I congratulate anyone who wants to improve their image or their physique but do so by sound whole food nutrition and a good exercise regime. Get the body you have to 100% efficiency first. Not by supplements of questionable quality or long term effect for a quick fix.

Okay, so it is evident you are unfamiliar with creatine. So there is a learning opportunity for you here.

Creatine is not a drug. It is a compound that is naturally produced by your own body and found in any muscle tissue you consume such as beef and fish. The creatine you buy in say Tesco is chemically identical to what your body produces or you consume in your food. It is no different from consuming vitamin D or iron tablets. You are correct regarding whole food nutrition but supplementing a diet with 5g of creatine is cheaper and more practical than consuming a 500g steak everyday. It is not a quick fix. We typically find people gain 1-1.5 kg of muscle by taking creatine (by contrast, a person can gain around 10kg of muscle during their first year of resistance training).

Creatine concentrates in muscle tissue, that is why you get a slight change is osmotic balance in said tissue. It is not going to say cause cerebral edema. Other things which can cause changes in osmotic balance include consuming salt or bananas.

You don't need to to wonder about the research, creatine is relatively well studied and the findings readily available online. Some summaries targeted at lay individuals:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/drugs-supplements-creatine/art-20347591
https://www.health.harvard.edu/exercise-and-fitness/what-is-creatine-potential-benefits-and-risks-of-this-popular-supplement
https://examine.com/supplements/creatine/
(edited 3 weeks ago)
Original post by Muttly
Your own post is somewhat contradictory. If Creatine is so safe why are you citing all the side effects that you consider to be minor but acceptable in the pursuit of the body beautiful (for such a minor gain?) I wonder what organs in the body are affected by osmotic balance? I wonder how many legitimate trials have been completed to give assurances. Every drug, no matter how innocuous has side effects. Many long term effects are unknown. The public are the guinea pigs. I congratulate anyone who wants to improve their image or their physique but do so by sound whole food nutrition and a good exercise regime. Get the body you have to 100% efficiency first. Not by supplements of questionable quality or long term effect for a quick fix.

This is what happens when someone types without any knowledge whatsoever
Reply 8
Creatine can aid muscle growth and strength. Some concerns include potential balding acceleration and effects on younger users. Assess risks and benefits with a healthcare provider. Proper hydration can mitigate water retention.

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