The Student Room Group

Weird male worker at the train station

I was at the train station last week on the way to school and pointedly stood at the far end of the platform as I was listening to music and didn't want to be bothered. Then a male train station staff member came up to me to ask which train I was getting. I told him which train because I thought I was in trouble or something. Then he walked up to me a second time about a minute later to ask me which school I go to. I stupidly told him again because I thought I was in trouble or something. But then soon after I told him he smiled and mumbled 'secondary school Hm'. Now I'm slightly worried as I've told my friend and she said I should probably try to report him but I don't now how. Please can someone help me?!! I want to prevent him from perving over other secondary school girls.
Original post by Anonymous
I was at the train station last week on the way to school and pointedly stood at the far end of the platform as I was listening to music and didn't want to be bothered. Then a male train station staff member came up to me to ask which train I was getting. I told him which train because I thought I was in trouble or something. Then he walked up to me a second time about a minute later to ask me which school I go to. I stupidly told him again because I thought I was in trouble or something. But then soon after I told him he smiled and mumbled 'secondary school Hm'. Now I'm slightly worried as I've told my friend and she said I should probably try to report him but I don't now how. Please can someone help me?!! I want to prevent him from perving over other secondary school girls.

To establish which trail operator manages the station (and therefore to whom you should complain) you can use this page on the National Rail web site. Search for you station, and it should say "Station managed by: " under the Station Information heading. Click that link and it'll take you to a page providing details about that operator, including how to contact Customer Services. They would be able to take details of your complaint. You could also click through onto the train operator's own web site, and look on there for details of their complaints procedure.
To play devil's advocate, he may have had suicide prevention training where staff are encouraged to check in on people by starting a simple conversation.

I don't work in this industry but do have suicide prevention training where we are encouraged to engage with people who come across as a bit down.

You've basically said you were at the far end of a platform and were trying to avoid people.

Unfortunately train stations and train tracks are hot spots for people taking their own life.

I have reported to train staff when I spotted someone distressed on a platform bench and a teenage girl crying in a platform toilet cubicle.

If you feel unsafe about your interaction do report it.

I just wonder whether your demeanor attracted attention so this staff member was undertaking a discrete welfare check.
Original post by Anonymous
To play devil's advocate, he may have had suicide prevention training where staff are encouraged to check in on people by starting a simple conversation.
I don't work in this industry but do have suicide prevention training where we are encouraged to engage with people who come across as a bit down.
You've basically said you were at the far end of a platform and were trying to avoid people.
Unfortunately train stations and train tracks are hot spots for people taking their own life.
I have reported to train staff when I spotted someone distressed on a platform bench and a teenage girl crying in a platform toilet cubicle.
If you feel unsafe about your interaction do report it.
I just wonder whether your demeanor attracted attention so this staff member was undertaking a discrete welfare check.

Life loss prevention was my first thought too, I've had the same treatment because I'd walked right to the end of a rural platform when dark because I was bored, and ironically was then reading the samaritan's sign that had been posted there 🙄

OP - I think you need to step back and think about what you and your friend are saying here. It's not a criminal offence or professional misconduct to make small talk with you, and unless there is something you aren't telling us it would be extremely inappropriate to try and get them sacked for simply talking to you, or even to label them a pervert tbh.
Reply 4
Original post by DataVenia
To establish which trail operator manages the station (and therefore to whom you should complain) you can use this page on the National Rail web site. Search for you station, and it should say "Station managed by: " under the Station Information heading. Click that link and it'll take you to a page providing details about that operator, including how to contact Customer Services. They would be able to take details of your complaint. You could also click through onto the train operator's own web site, and look on there for details of their complaints procedure.

Thank you so much
Reply 5
Original post by Anonymous
To play devil's advocate, he may have had suicide prevention training where staff are encouraged to check in on people by starting a simple conversation.
I don't work in this industry but do have suicide prevention training where we are encouraged to engage with people who come across as a bit down.
You've basically said you were at the far end of a platform and were trying to avoid people.
Unfortunately train stations and train tracks are hot spots for people taking their own life.
I have reported to train staff when I spotted someone distressed on a platform bench and a teenage girl crying in a platform toilet cubicle.
If you feel unsafe about your interaction do report it.
I just wonder whether your demeanor attracted attention so this staff member was undertaking a discrete welfare check.

Your post has not been very helpful. Even if he was doing a suicide prevention check he did not have to ask for which school I go to. Its none of his business of where I was standing or what I was doing at the platform. And I wasn't even at the far end of the platform I was near the middle end waiting for my train.
Reply 6
Original post by Anonymous
To play devil's advocate, he may have had suicide prevention training where staff are encouraged to check in on people by starting a simple conversation.
I don't work in this industry but do have suicide prevention training where we are encouraged to engage with people who come across as a bit down.
You've basically said you were at the far end of a platform and were trying to avoid people.
Unfortunately train stations and train tracks are hot spots for people taking their own life.
I have reported to train staff when I spotted someone distressed on a platform bench and a teenage girl crying in a platform toilet cubicle.
If you feel unsafe about your interaction do report it.
I just wonder whether your demeanor attracted attention so this staff member was undertaking a discrete welfare check.

I had meant to say middle end not far end
Reply 7
Original post by StriderHort
Life loss prevention was my first thought too, I've had the same treatment because I'd walked right to the end of a rural platform when dark because I was bored, and ironically was then reading the samaritan's sign that had been posted there 🙄
OP - I think you need to step back and think about what you and your friend are saying here. It's not a criminal offence or professional misconduct to make small talk with you, and unless there is something you aren't telling us it would be extremely inappropriate to try and get them sacked for simply talking to you, or even to label them a pervert tbh.

He shouldn't have asked a schoolgirl which school she goes to. It's inappropriate and unwanted contact. And he came back a second time to talk to me again even though I was uncomfortable the first time.
Original post by StriderHort
Why? Maybe he was curious if you went to the same school as his kid does, or he did years ago, or thought you were someone else shrug. It's not on it's own a super creepy question, especially if you have nothing else to add to it. Pretty lame to try and get someone sacked because you felt uncomfortable for some vague reason.

Sounds like you’re trying to defend someone who could have had bad intentions and dismiss/downplay this persons worry
Reply 9
Original post by Anonymous
I was at the train station last week on the way to school and pointedly stood at the far end of the platform as I was listening to music and didn't want to be bothered. Then a male train station staff member came up to me to ask which train I was getting. I told him which train because I thought I was in trouble or something. Then he walked up to me a second time about a minute later to ask me which school I go to. I stupidly told him again because I thought I was in trouble or something. But then soon after I told him he smiled and mumbled 'secondary school Hm'. Now I'm slightly worried as I've told my friend and she said I should probably try to report him but I don't now how. Please can someone help me?!! I want to prevent him from perving over other secondary school girls.

I think it's a bit of a stretch to accuse him of "perving over" you. There may have been a valid reason for him asking you those questions, eg perhaps one of the trains was delayed?
Original post by Anonymous
Sounds like you’re trying to defend someone who could have had bad intentions and dismiss/downplay this persons worry


I don't think it's unreasonable for someone to say "don't go accusing someone of something based on no actual evidence". And the operative phrase here is "could have had" - the same person could well have also had good intentions.

A basic level of caution is warranted, but having had a reasonable explanation provided for the behaviour, it would be unreasonable to make significant accusations without seeing it repeated in another context where it's clearly not explained by the alternate explanation provided.

You may well see if you go back to the same train station the same person approaching an old man standing in the same area in the same conditions. If he repeatedly approached you and your friend in different areas of the train station then that may be a cause for concern but a singular interaction isn't.
Original post by Anonymous
Sounds like you’re trying to defend someone who could have had bad intentions and dismiss/downplay this persons worry

'could have maybe in my head' no valid reason to try and ruin a career. As I said, unless there's something significant we're not being told this is nothing.

If there's some previously omitted element such as "And then he said he liked girls in school uniform!' then by all means complain to high heaven. But if not... then it's a load of ****.
Original post by Anonymous
Your post has not been very helpful. Even if he was doing a suicide prevention check he did not have to ask for which school I go to. Its none of his business of where I was standing or what I was doing at the platform. And I wasn't even at the far end of the platform I was near the middle end waiting for my train.

It was spectacularly helpful.

Firstly, you and others on this forum, now know that staff working in public spaces, and particularly those in locations that have high suicide activity, may engage in idle conversation to identify if a member of the public is at risk.

Although you have changed your story as it relates to where you were standing, you pretty much indicated that you were withdrawn and anti-social in demeanor.

Secondly, I encouraged you to report their behaviour if you had concerns.

So I have provided thoughtful context to support a potential alternative explanation while not dismissing yours.
Reply 13
Original post by Anonymous
Your post has not been very helpful. Even if he was doing a suicide prevention check he did not have to ask for which school I go to. Its none of his business of where I was standing or what I was doing at the platform. And I wasn't even at the far end of the platform I was near the middle end waiting for my train.

Of course it's the business of the staff to manage people who are on the platform; I saw it recently during a train journey I was making, where a member of staff was monitoring someone who was upset and ensured they got on their train.

And no, you weren't near the middle. Your words: "I was at the train station last week on the way to school and pointedly stood at the far end of the platform as I was listening to music and didn't want to be bothered."
(edited 1 month ago)

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