The Student Room Group

Concerns related to subletting

I am planning to move out of my current house due to conflicts with flatmate. Someone in the same town offers me a room for the upcoming summer, I viewed and am fine with it and he said he would be charging me a cheaper rent. He showed me the screenshot of his email with his letting agency saying the subletting didn't need a written contract but only my contact details, which I had given.

Is it normal for subletting not to have a written contract? In case of a dispute after moving in, what can I use to back myself up? Would the Facebook messages suffice as evidence that I am being granted the right to stay in the house-to-be over the upcoming summer?
Reply 1
I would be very wary of moving into accommodation when you don't have anything in writing or signed. With it being a screenshot, was the email even genuine?

Suggest you ask for the details of the letting agency and get a contract. If he's reluctant to take it further that's a red flag.
Reply 2
Original post by Surnia
I would be very wary of moving into accommodation when you don't have anything in writing or signed. With it being a screenshot, was the email even genuine?
Suggest you ask for the details of the letting agency and get a contract. If he's reluctant to take it further that's a red flag.

I turned it down due to their persistent reluctance to write up a contract.
From the Shelter England website (housing advice charity) :

Understand your tenancy rights

Knowing your rights can help you:
stand up to your landlord or letting agent
not give in to illegal pressure to leave your home
tell people like the council or the police what is happening

You do not need a written agreement to have tenancy rights.

You have tenancy rights even if you've been given notice or owe rent.

You have these rights until you end your tenancy or are evicted by bailiffs.

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