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Natural sciences at UCL or Chem eng at Manchester

Which choice is the best in terms of career paths in things like technology or finance with high salaries and growth during the job. Problem with Manchester is the location and having to spend a lot of money.
What are the positives of each and negatives
At this point go for chem eng. You can switch to finance at any time!
Original post by rfkwfnn
Which choice is the best in terms of career paths in things like technology or finance with high salaries and growth during the job. Problem with Manchester is the location and having to spend a lot of money.
What are the positives of each and negatives

If you want to work in finance or tech, neither. Study something more relevant.
Reply 3
Original post by Smack
If you want to work in finance or tech, neither. Study something more relevant.


Why are they not relevant? Both chem eng and natural sciences are multidisciplinary
Original post by rfkwfnn
Why are they not relevant? Both chem eng and natural sciences are multidisciplinary

Neither have much in the way of coding in them so if you wanted to go into tech you'd need to do plenty of practice in your own time. For finance, OK, lots of jobs won't care what your degree is, though it would probably still be better to study something where your peers will also largely be interested in going into finance.

I wouldn't recommend studying chemical engineering - or any type of engineering - if you are not actively considering a career in engineering. Natural sciences is a bit different since there aren't that many "natural sciences" jobs, so maybe lots of people do take it with the intention of moving into finance afterwards.
Reply 5
Original post by Smack
Neither have much in the way of coding in them so if you wanted to go into tech you'd need to do plenty of practice in your own time. For finance, OK, lots of jobs won't care what your degree is, though it would probably still be better to study something where your peers will also largely be interested in going into finance.
I wouldn't recommend studying chemical engineering - or any type of engineering - if you are not actively considering a career in engineering. Natural sciences is a bit different since there aren't that many "natural sciences" jobs, so maybe lots of people do take it with the intention of moving into finance afterwards.


Don’t a lot of people who do chemical engineering go into finance jobs? Because of the multidisciplinary factor of it. Also I’ve been told, big companies like courses like chem eng, because of all the different skills you get from it
Original post by rfkwfnn
Don’t a lot of people who do chemical engineering go into finance jobs? Because of the multidisciplinary factor of it. Also I’ve been told, big companies like courses like chem eng, because of all the different skills you get from it

I don't think it's particularly common to go from chemical engineering into finance, no, though I haven't looked at graduate destinations for quite some years. Companies that aren't specifically looking for chemical engineering grads, who will accept grads from any discipline, don't care about chemical engineering degrees. There's nothing particularly special about them relative to a whole host of other degrees which are also generally understood to be fairly rigorous, from maths, to sciences, to economics, to humanities, etc.
Reply 7
Original post by Smack
I don't think it's particularly common to go from chemical engineering into finance, no, though I haven't looked at graduate destinations for quite some years. Companies that aren't specifically looking for chemical engineering grads, who will accept grads from any discipline, don't care about chemical engineering degrees. There's nothing particularly special about them relative to a whole host of other degrees which are also generally understood to be fairly rigorous, from maths, to sciences, to economics, to humanities, etc.


What about consulting, I’ve also heard, many chem eng grads to work in consulting and earn really high salaries
Original post by rfkwfnn
What about consulting, I’ve also heard, many chem eng grads to work in consulting and earn really high salaries

What type of consulting?
Reply 9
Original post by Smack
What type of consulting?


Consulting in general, I don’t know exactly.
Do you mean management consulting?
Original post by rfkwfnn
Consulting in general, I don’t know exactly.

Brilliant, as someone who has worked in engineering, consultancy and engineering consultancy, im going to say please think more thoroughly before choosing a course, university and career based on a few sentiments for a iob you may well not be suited to (consulting requires attention to detail, foresight & genuine enjoyment of the culture in the industry to do well).

Consultancy is very competitive, especially at the graduate level. Less than 1% of candidates get job offers for graduate level roles. Those who do get offers have a clear and targeted interest in consultancy, and the selection is targeted at people who can manage what is often agile, and high intensity work loads.

Choosing a career solely because the monthly pay check looks good is not a sensible way to choose, especially considering almost all of your long term earnings come from getting promoted and doing well, which is probably going to be significantly easier in an industry and company which you are actually passionate about.
(edited 3 weeks ago)

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