The Student Room Group

History A Level

Guys I need HELP!
I have my history a level in 3 weeks and im really struggling to remember anything

I have done timelines, mind maps, revision cards, past papers, written on a whiteboard, tried blurting, watching YT videos, watching films with related content, quizes, simply tried reading through my notes and the textbook but can get the content to go into my head

I remember the exam technique and when I have content to included I can write the essay but I can't remember the content and I am worried im going to fail

any advice???
(edited 1 month ago)
Reply 1
Original post by 85008
Guys I need HELP!
I have my history a level in 3 weeks and im really struggling to remember anything
I have done timelines, mind maps, revision cards, past papers, written on a whiteboard, tried blurting, watching YT videos, watching films with related content, quizes, simply tried reading through my notes and the textbook but can get the content to go into my head
I remember the exam technique and when I have content to included I can write the essay but I can't remember the content and I am worried im going to fail
any advice???

I know you've said you've tried revision cards but if you haven't tried anki to make them, it might be worth a try.

Perhaps also try question planning, first do it closed book and then add on additional facts from mark schemes / textbooks in a different colour
Original post by 85008
Guys I need HELP!
I have my history a level in 3 weeks and im really struggling to remember anything
I have done timelines, mind maps, revision cards, past papers, written on a whiteboard, tried blurting, watching YT videos, watching films with related content, quizes, simply tried reading through my notes and the textbook but can get the content to go into my head
I remember the exam technique and when I have content to included I can write the essay but I can't remember the content and I am worried im going to fail
any advice???

Hi,

I did my History A-Level last year and the most difficult part for me was remembering the key details, like dates and names. The most important thing to remember when you're trying to revise is that it's different for everyone, and you have to find what's right for you.

Personally, I found that the conditions I was revising in were more important than the methods I was using. I needed background noise because I really struggled in silence, but couldn't have anything too engaging as I would get distracted. There are loads of instrumental versions of songs I liked on YouTube and Spotify, so I used to put those on quietly in the background. Also, group studying never worked for me. Whenever I tried to revise with other people, even if we were quizzing each other, I'd always get distracted so I found it more productive to do it on my own. I found that revision always worked best when I was at my desk in my bedroom. I could never revise effectively at Sixth Form, at the library, or other rooms in the house. Have you considered anything like this when doing your revision?

I liked watching Youtube videos and then writing down notes from them, because they often went through key points. Acronyms and mnemonics were extremely helpful for me if I needed to remember really specific facts like which people were involved in an event, or outcomes of a treaty. I also found websites like Seneca useful.

The difficult part about content for history is that there isn't always an easy way to remember it. Sometimes just repeating something over and over again was the only way I could remember it. I often worked out which topics I was struggled more with and made posters for them. Usually they were really simple and clear, like a basic mind map, or just important dates and what happened on them. I would put the posters anywhere in the house I was likely to see them, even if it was just a quick glance, like my bedroom door, next to my mirror or next to the kettle. Seeing the facts enough just sort of stuck them in my memory.

Hope this helps, good luck with the revision and exams!

Sophie
LJMU Student Rep
Reply 3
Original post by yogo1o
I know you've said you've tried revision cards but if you haven't tried anki to make them, it might be worth a try.
Perhaps also try question planning, first do it closed book and then add on additional facts from mark schemes / textbooks in a different colour

Yeah I think I will give it a try, worth a go.

I have tried the closed book and then open book before, but think I might try it again now I have done a few more weeks of revision.


Thanks for the advice!!
Reply 4
Original post by LJMUStudentReps
Hi,
I did my History A-Level last year and the most difficult part for me was remembering the key details, like dates and names. The most important thing to remember when you're trying to revise is that it's different for everyone, and you have to find what's right for you.
Personally, I found that the conditions I was revising in were more important than the methods I was using. I needed background noise because I really struggled in silence, but couldn't have anything too engaging as I would get distracted. There are loads of instrumental versions of songs I liked on YouTube and Spotify, so I used to put those on quietly in the background. Also, group studying never worked for me. Whenever I tried to revise with other people, even if we were quizzing each other, I'd always get distracted so I found it more productive to do it on my own. I found that revision always worked best when I was at my desk in my bedroom. I could never revise effectively at Sixth Form, at the library, or other rooms in the house. Have you considered anything like this when doing your revision?
I liked watching Youtube videos and then writing down notes from them, because they often went through key points. Acronyms and mnemonics were extremely helpful for me if I needed to remember really specific facts like which people were involved in an event, or outcomes of a treaty. I also found websites like Seneca useful.
The difficult part about content for history is that there isn't always an easy way to remember it. Sometimes just repeating something over and over again was the only way I could remember it. I often worked out which topics I was struggled more with and made posters for them. Usually they were really simple and clear, like a basic mind map, or just important dates and what happened on them. I would put the posters anywhere in the house I was likely to see them, even if it was just a quick glance, like my bedroom door, next to my mirror or next to the kettle. Seeing the facts enough just sort of stuck them in my memory.
Hope this helps, good luck with the revision and exams!
Sophie
LJMU Student Rep

Hi,

That was all really useful advice thank you.

I usually have to study in the most silent place ever otherwise I can't focus, especially if I am at home. And I do the same thing that I listen to instrumental music.

I think the problem with history is that I lack interest with the stuarts, as I can remember key events for the Nazis, but I have no real interest and get quite bored when im trying to revise it.

I will have a look at the Seneca, as I want to give anything a go.

I also think im just going to start doing practice questions as I hope it might help to apply my knowledge rather than just trying to get the answer on the flashcard right for example.

Thanks for the advice, it was really useful!!
Original post by 85008
Guys I need HELP!
I have my history a level in 3 weeks and im really struggling to remember anything
I have done timelines, mind maps, revision cards, past papers, written on a whiteboard, tried blurting, watching YT videos, watching films with related content, quizes, simply tried reading through my notes and the textbook but can get the content to go into my head
I remember the exam technique and when I have content to included I can write the essay but I can't remember the content and I am worried im going to fail
any advice???

Hi,

Firstly, keep calm! I know it’s daunting when an exam is coming up but you still have plenty of time.

I’d suggest putting up notes around your room/bathroom and not making them too detailed, just clear points and maybe colour coded. You could try recording yourself reading the notes then next time you’re on a walk/bus/at the gym you can listen back to them.

Have you tried studying with friends? Looking at past papers and mark schemes always helped me.

Good luck!
Alice, LJMU student rep x
Reply 6
Original post by LJMUStudentReps
Hi,
I did my History A-Level last year and the most difficult part for me was remembering the key details, like dates and names. The most important thing to remember when you're trying to revise is that it's different for everyone, and you have to find what's right for you.
Personally, I found that the conditions I was revising in were more important than the methods I was using. I needed background noise because I really struggled in silence, but couldn't have anything too engaging as I would get distracted. There are loads of instrumental versions of songs I liked on YouTube and Spotify, so I used to put those on quietly in the background. Also, group studying never worked for me. Whenever I tried to revise with other people, even if we were quizzing each other, I'd always get distracted so I found it more productive to do it on my own. I found that revision always worked best when I was at my desk in my bedroom. I could never revise effectively at Sixth Form, at the library, or other rooms in the house. Have you considered anything like this when doing your revision?
I liked watching Youtube videos and then writing down notes from them, because they often went through key points. Acronyms and mnemonics were extremely helpful for me if I needed to remember really specific facts like which people were involved in an event, or outcomes of a treaty. I also found websites like Seneca useful.
The difficult part about content for history is that there isn't always an easy way to remember it. Sometimes just repeating something over and over again was the only way I could remember it. I often worked out which topics I was struggled more with and made posters for them. Usually they were really simple and clear, like a basic mind map, or just important dates and what happened on them. I would put the posters anywhere in the house I was likely to see them, even if it was just a quick glance, like my bedroom door, next to my mirror or next to the kettle. Seeing the facts enough just sort of stuck them in my memory.
Hope this helps, good luck with the revision and exams!
Sophie
LJMU Student Rep


Hi what topic did you do in Alevel history??

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