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Mechanical Engineering Meng vs Aerospace Engineering Meng

I've been offered a place to study mech eng at UCL and aero eng with a year in industry at Bath. I am currently really interested in aerospace engineering but don't want to sacrifice a uni like UCL. I'm also thinking if I do take UCL, if I should switch to the Beng course and do a masters in aero somewhere else. I would really appreciate some advice on this.
Original post by ConfusedMonke
I've been offered a place to study mech eng at UCL and aero eng with a year in industry at Bath. I am currently really interested in aerospace engineering but don't want to sacrifice a uni like UCL. I'm also thinking if I do take UCL, if I should switch to the Beng course and do a masters in aero somewhere else. I would really appreciate some advice on this.

Aero is essentially a specialised mechanical engineering degree. With an aero degree you probably have less options afterwards, though a year in industry - assuming you get one, which isn't guaranteed - does help a lot when it comes to getting a graduate job. If you're specifically interested in the aerospace sector, the best degree to do is probably actually electrical & electronics engineering, or computer science / software engineering.
Original post by ConfusedMonke
I've been offered a place to study mech eng at UCL and aero eng with a year in industry at Bath. I am currently really interested in aerospace engineering but don't want to sacrifice a uni like UCL. I'm also thinking if I do take UCL, if I should switch to the Beng course and do a masters in aero somewhere else. I would really appreciate some advice on this.

1.

Interest and Passion: Consider which field aligns more closely with your interests and passion. If you have a strong fascination with aircraft, spacecraft, and aerospace technologies, Aerospace Engineering might be the better choice. On the other hand, if you're interested in a broader range of mechanical systems and industries, Mechanical Engineering could be more suitable.

2.

Career Opportunities: Research the career opportunities available in each field and determine which aligns better with your career goals. Aerospace Engineering offers specialized opportunities in the aerospace industry, including aircraft manufacturers, space agencies, and defense contractors. Mechanical Engineering, on the other hand, provides a broader range of career paths across industries such as automotive, manufacturing, energy, robotics, and more.

3.

Specializations and Focus Areas: Consider the specific areas of specialization and focus within each field that interest you the most. Aerospace Engineering offers specializations in aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, and spacecraft design, among others. Mechanical Engineering offers specializations in automotive engineering, robotics, renewable energy systems, biomechanics, and more.

4.

Interdisciplinary Opportunities: Think about whether you're interested in interdisciplinary research and collaboration. Both Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offer opportunities to work on interdisciplinary projects, but Aerospace Engineering may have more focused applications within the aerospace industry, while Mechanical Engineering may offer a broader range of interdisciplinary opportunities across various industries.

5.

Industry Trends and Job Market: Research the current industry trends and job market demand for each field to assess future career prospects. Consider factors such as technological advancements, market growth, and demand for skilled professionals in each industry.

Ultimately, the decision should be based on your individual interests, strengths, and career aspirations. It may also be helpful to talk to professors, professionals working in the field, or career counselors to gain more insights and guidance before making a decision.
Just a sidenote, the first 2 years at Bath are basically Mech Eng for all the engineering courses except IMEE and EIE i think, so you won't be missing out on much if you lvoe Mech and Aero. Bath is also very reputable amongst employers in the industry, and i've heard there is a sort of teaching quality decrease atm at UCL, paired with their tutorials being 30-40 ppl instead of somewhere around 10 like at Bath (told from a Phd research assistant/ tutorial lecturer at UCL). Plus, the experience you gain from a placement year at Bath is extremely helpful when looking for jobs going up against candidates from Oxbridge/Imperial who may have less experience and sets you up very nicely. One last thing is the sheer amount of engineering societies and teams at Bath you can join is amazing, and also allows you to build an impressive experience portfolio.
Original post by ConfusedMonke
I've been offered a place to study mech eng at UCL and aero eng with a year in industry at Bath. I am currently really interested in aerospace engineering but don't want to sacrifice a uni like UCL. I'm also thinking if I do take UCL, if I should switch to the Beng course and do a masters in aero somewhere else. I would really appreciate some advice on this.

You've clearly not looked into the department at UCL. it's not worth it, especially if ur an international student. (still not worth it if home lol).

UCL's mechanical engineering dept is ranked 2nd Lowest for student satisfaction for all courses across all UK unis. professors literally do not care at all. most of them only teach there because they are required to teach a certain number of hours per week as part of their job outside the uni for sister companies.
(this info was from a thread ive looked at recently, but cant remember where to look for it to attach link)
Bath is a great uni, and for engineering employers rarely look at the universities as a deciding factor. its much better to have a year in industry + MEng like you would at Bath.
Id pick bath in a heartbeat.
Original post by ConfusedMonke
I've been offered a place to study mech eng at UCL and aero eng with a year in industry at Bath. I am currently really interested in aerospace engineering but don't want to sacrifice a uni like UCL. I'm also thinking if I do take UCL, if I should switch to the Beng course and do a masters in aero somewhere else. I would really appreciate some advice on this.

It depends what you decide is most important to you. At Bath, you can change which course you want to do up until 3rd year - everyone in the mechanical engineering department (aero, mech, design) learns the same thing for the first 2 years.

I would also say doing a year in industry is very important these days - it will be much easier to find a good graduate job with it as it proves that you are a "real" engineer with experience of the working world.

I would definitely take the time to compare the courses, and see what facilities each university has to offer. A "big" university name does not always guarantee a good engineering course.

I'm currently doing the integrated masters in Mechanical engineering at Bath so if you have any more questions about what it is like here, I am happy to answer them :smile:

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